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Jen Dixon

Spoons! Glorious Spoons!

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I like to break up the standard cubes before using them, they are too big, and the result is syrupy. That is one reason I was eyeing the wormwood leaf spoon, since it has a profile for similar type work, on the handle.

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It really comes down to personal preference. I love the grillagee, the le trous series for example.

Both are represented on AD as the #29 and #12, respectively. Both do a great job of drizzling in multiple controlled drips, and holding up the sugar. The L'Etoiles is always a nice large spoon, for your bigger glasses, with nice little stars as holes, and they work nicely too, as do most of these spoons. I wouldn't worry about it too much...buy a couple that look cool to you, and see what happens!

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I've got an assortment of spoons. They sit in an antique glass and hold it down. Every now and then, I'll grab any random spoon when I'm drinking with someone who prefers sugar. As for the sugar itself, I think Peter posted a link some time ago with rectangular kosher sugar tablets that were the closest to the sugar cubes from back in the day.

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That's a beautiful flatware box, Scott. I was actually considering buying one of those myself last month, but I decided that I wouldn't be completely happy with it because I wouldn't be able to glance over in my laziness and see my collection :laf:

 

Anyway, I bought an antique curio box made in Holland (it has a stamp to that effect) that seems like it might be circa 1930, though the person I purchased it from thought it was a bit older around 1900. I'll confess I have no idea about that, but either way, I love it (especially the beading), and my vintage spoons look wonderful inside of it (if I do say so myself).

 

spoonbox.jpg

 

That's a really great case! I tried googling "antique curio box" but didn't come across the same type of piece. What I did see was mostly plastic jewelry boxes that had nothing to do with what you posted =(... I wonder If I were going into an antique store, what would I call this in order to give the seller an idea of what I'm trying to buy? Just a wall mounted display case?

 

-Max

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Just out of curiosity, and after seeing those spoons made by Kirk - Has anyone ever tried to make their own? I am living overseas at the moment, but back home I have access to a decent workshop. I was just curious if it was possible, or if anyone has tried, to take a modern piece of 18-10 silverware and turn it into some type of custom sugar spoon.

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Phil sells too many nice and cheap spoons to make it worth the effort of mangling soup spoons and switch blades. Drippers, on the other hand, are easy to cobble up, and easy to get them working correctly.

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I found this today while I was looking for something else. At first, I thought it was a jewel or ornament of some sorts, but if you read the description it says "the essential accessory for preparing your luxurious wormwood delicacy in truly decadent style ". I have no idea if pewter is good to use with edibles, but if the stone is a Swarovsky crystal, then it has lead on it.

 

Don't miss the matching necklace. I actually like this one ;)

 

Actually, Swarovsky crystal is made with silver, not lead. Their speciality.

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Dare I continue the echo of sweetness? Yes, I do dare. That's a fine collection you have there, Garrett, not least for the reasons which Clement pointed out.

 

It seems that perhaps you've fallen into the same trap I have, and discovered that absinthe spoons are like potato chips - you can't stop after just one, or five, or ten, or.... :cheers:

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Thanks all! And yes I do believe that I have indeed fallen into that same trap and cannot stop from reaching for that next chip. Even worse is that I'm afraid that my spoon addiction will soon transition into a glassware addiction...

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Talk about addiction Y_Y

 

The other day, friends of mine where at my place and I serve them an absinthe (Rubis, very good stuff). They had already seen the spoons I have on display, that is, the most beautiful

Comes the time to chose a spoon to prepare an absinthe correctly. I tell my girlfriend to fetch a "semi d'étoiles et de trèfles", none of which are on display.

 

You should have seen the face of my friends when she grabbed one of my spoon holders (2 of them are actually used as spoon holders) and they realised they were choke full.

 

Well anyway, careful, there may come a time when you truly want the beautiful and expensive (Feuille for example, or the Eiffel you don't have (forget the ferris wheel)). Either stop before or start saving :)

 

Even worse is that I'm afraid that my spoon addiction will soon transition into a glassware addiction

And there is also that.

But overall, glass addiction is less costly. AFAIK I have only seen one glass fetching above $1000

Most of them are around the 100€ mark on the antique markets, $200 mark if you buy them to a specialized shop.

And overall, it can be less frustrating. Apart from some very particular shapes (etched cordons, italian pontarlier, tarragona... and that's almost all of it), there is no glass alike another (and even with the most standard you have variations), therefore you almost always have the satisfaction of an unique piece

 

AFAIK, in terms of cost, I would put the various collections in this order (prices on French market)

Vintage posters (specially metallic ones) : 50 to 20000€ each (criteria include rarity, condition, size)

Fountains 300 to ~5000 each (<1000 are post ban)

Brouilleurs : 30 (glass) to a few thousands (for the rarest of the rarest, think Achin, for example)

Glasses : 10 to 1500 (pieces over 150 are exceptional)

Spoons : 2 to ~2000 (the whole range is covered)

Documents : Cheap to "not cheap", prices vary

 

And there is another type of collection, for which no estimate is feasible : uncommon items.

A well known collector of this kind is Marc Thuillier.

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