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Horn Brain

Tentatively Titled the "French Whiskey"

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So I'm pretty new to fiddling with drinks, so I'd like some input on something I threw together...

 

Equal parts:

Your Favorite Gin

Sweet Vermouth

Dry Vermouth

 

Half a part:

Limoncello

 

liberal dose of Peychaud's bitters

 

Stirred drink.

 

First of all

I'm not sure it's new. I searched for it everywhere but couldn't find anything with this recipe, but if anyone knows this drink please let me know so I can stop pretending to be original.

 

Second

The drink is pretty sweet, but I find it's still nearly balanced (at least to me). I just love the smell of the sweet vermouth, as well, almost meaty. If you're making this for yourself and you find it's too sweet, go ahead and play with the proportions. I'm no master mixologist so I won't be offended in the least if you find you prefer it with, for example, twice the relative amount of gin or something (Though I find it too harsh when using a lot of gin to make it more Martini-esque). Also, the Peychaud's were just a guess, if you think Angostura would work better, by all means, let me know!

 

Third

The name needs work. It's a play on the fact that it looks exactly like whiskey but it isn't at all, but since only one of the ingredients (dry vermouth) is traditionally french and I don't even feel that it is the backbone of the drink, I would suggest "Italian Whiskey". Italian for the sweet, "Italian" vermouth and the limoncello. I liked the kind of whimsical notion of people without access to good whiskey mixing this thing up instead.

 

Finally

Since it's sweet and also has some whiskey-ness to it, I was thinking it would be fun to add a few dashes of absinthe lining the glass with a lemon twist and call it a Sissy Sazerac or something. I'll tell you what I think once I buy some ice tomorrow.

 

So let me know what you think!

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Interesting.

 

The combination of equal parts gin, sweet vermouth, and dry vermouth in a cocktail isn't all that unusual. Probably the most famous example is the Fourth Degree, which also includes a few dashes of absinthe. It's been around since before Prohibition and is an excellent drink. Your impulse to add lemon is a good one, though I'd personally prefer a twist of peel to a half ounce or so of limoncello.

 

There are many variations on this drink in old cocktail books (like the Savoy), but I don't think I've come across one that includes Peychaud's bitters; it's typically used in drinks that have a darker, heavier spirit as their base: rye, brandy, scotch, bourbon, etc. So your contribution there may be unique.

 

As far as the name goes, I'm not sure. I understand the impulse to give a cocktail a name based on its appearance--I've done it myself. But you might want to stay away from a name that could create unwanted associations or expectations in the mind of the drinker as she takes her first sip. I'm not sure I'd want to be thinking "whiskey" and tasting gin and vermouth; that type of cognitive dissonance can ruin a drink for me. But that's just me.

 

Best of luck with your continued experimentation!

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I have been searching for a use for a bottle of Limoncello I recieved as a gift, I would be glad to try this out, and maybe experiment a bit. :D

 

I have experimented with subbing out lemon juice and syrup in some cocktails for the Limoncello, with questionable results. I find it hard to work with because it is so strong tasting to me. Just by looking at the ingredient list up there, I would definitly suggest upping the gin and dropping back a bit on the liqueur.

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I have been searching for a use for a bottle of Limoncello

Other than drinking it?!

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I have been searching for a use for a bottle of Limoncello I recieved as a gift, I would be glad to try this out, and maybe experiment a bit. :D

 

I have experimented with subbing out lemon juice and syrup in some cocktails for the Limoncello, with questionable results. I find it hard to work with because it is so strong tasting to me. Just by looking at the ingredient list up there, I would definitly suggest upping the gin and dropping back a bit on the liqueur.

Thanks for the suggestions and I'll give it a spin.

 

As far as limoncello goes, to me it's nothing like lemon juice and simple syrup. It's got more of a lemon drop taste (the candy not the shot) than a taste of actual lemons to me. I've heard that it can be used in a fashion similar to super sweet things like Midori, Creme de framboise/fraise, etc. You just have to make sure you're not doing anything silly like mixing citrus with cream when you mix it around :)

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Interesting.

 

The combination of equal parts gin, sweet vermouth, and dry vermouth in a cocktail isn't all that unusual. Probably the most famous example is the Fourth Degree, which also includes a few dashes of absinthe. It's been around since before Prohibition and is an excellent drink. Your impulse to add lemon is a good one, though I'd personally prefer a twist of peel to a half ounce or so of limoncello.

 

There are many variations on this drink in old cocktail books (like the Savoy), but I don't think I've come across one that includes Peychaud's bitters; it's typically used in drinks that have a darker, heavier spirit as their base: rye, brandy, scotch, bourbon, etc. So your contribution there may be unique.

 

As far as the name goes, I'm not sure. I understand the impulse to give a cocktail a name based on its appearance--I've done it myself. But you might want to stay away from a name that could create unwanted associations or expectations in the mind of the drinker as she takes her first sip. I'm not sure I'd want to be thinking "whiskey" and tasting gin and vermouth; that type of cognitive dissonance can ruin a drink for me. But that's just me.

 

Best of luck with your continued experimentation!

Thanks for the suggestions and the history, let me know if you give it a try.

 

I think the problem you have with the name is in the "whiskey" part, while I am looking for a better fit than "French". You have a good point about expectations, one that I hadn't considered, but I still think it's ok, since if you ask someone if they want to try an Italian Whiskey, they're going to be ready for something non-traditional anyway :)

 

As far as the taste, I will try it next time with a little higher proportion of gin, but I don't think I'll go as far as making it a Perfect Martini with limoncello and bitters. For one, I'm trying to kill this bottle of Seagram's so I can move on to Plymouth, so I'd rather not put it in the spotlight, for another, I really like the way the sweet vermouth works in this one; Both the smell and taste seem bound by it.

 

That green-eyed lady looks good, though I don't think I have everything I need to make it. I'll head over and give you a review if I ever try one at a bar, though.

 

Cheers! :cheers:

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If you like sweet vermouth and are looking to bury a not-too-stellar gin in the background, I would suggest a negroni.

Campari no tengo

 

My stock isn't fully filled out yet. Thanks for the idea though. I will put it on my list for my next restocking trip.

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I have been searching for a use for a bottle of Limoncello I recieved as a gift

 

Take 2 oz lemoncello and muddle it with 6 fresh mint leaves, add ice and shake the hell out of it. Strain into an ice-filled short glass and top with 4-6 oz of ginger beer. Garnish with a sprig of mint and a straw. It's a great warm weather sipper.

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Here's the Serrano cocktail too:

 

In our (Imbibe Magainze) conversation with Tony Abou-Ganim, the cocktail legend revealed his affinity for Campari. Playing around with the bitter orange liqueur for several recipes in his new book, The Modern Mixologist, Abou-Ganim introduces the Serrano Cocktail (which is named for James Beard award-winning chef Julian Serrano). With vodka as its backbone, this drink combines Campari, limoncello and fresh orange juice for a vibrant sipper. Try it with a batch of homemade limoncello for extra citrusy brightness.

 

 

 

1 1/2 oz. vodka

1/2 oz. Campari

1/2 oz. limoncello

1 1/2 oz. fresh orange juice

Ice cubes

Tools: shaker, strainer

Glass: coupe

Garnish: lime twist

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Thanks for the tips!

 

I am sipping on this Serrano Cocktail right now, and I am really enjoying it. This is a good one for me, because I often struggle with Campari. I love Branca, and Ramazzotti, and Cynar, and amaros of all sorts, but Campari has always been hard for my palate.

 

I can add this to the Negroni, as ways I can handle Campari :D

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So I did a little more looking and I found something called the Trinity: equal parts gin, sweet and dry vermouth. So this is a trinity with limoncello and peychaud's bitters.

 

I also forgot to specifically say that I serve this drink up in a cocktail glass, not on the rocks, if anyone was confused.

 

Anybody had a chance to try it or perhaps even experiment a little?

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Update:

 

Just tried it with an absinthe-lined glass. Just wonderful. I really think this one's a keeper. Going with French Whiskey, after all, since the sweet vermouth is my favorite component of the flavor. I'll keep toying with it.

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