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Greetings from a New Colorado Absinthe Distiller!

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Whoa! Sorry I missed the grand entrance! Welcome aboard, Joe and Amanda! I look forward to trying your absinthe as soon as humanly possible!

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This odd mythical creature that G~ mentioned? I don't think they really exist (and I have a bank account to prove it). In theatre, we call them Angels and they are equally as mythical as Investors.

 

But if it was easy, everyone would do it, right?

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Welcome aboard! Looking forward to trying your absinthe. :)

 

I have to agree with Ron - you may want to either rethink the bottle color or make it more obvious on the label what type of absinthe the buyer is getting themself into. Looking at just the picture of the bottle, all I could think was, "Hills?" If I just saw it on a shelf or that pic on a web-site, I'd probably have passed it on by purely on reflex action.

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Welcome aboard! Looking forward to trying your absinthe. :)

 

I have to agree with Ron - you may want to either rethink the bottle color or make it more obvious on the label what type of absinthe the buyer is getting themself into. Looking at just the picture of the bottle, all I could think was, "Hills?" If I just saw it on a shelf or that pic on a web-site, I'd probably have passed it on by purely on reflex action.

 

 

I appreciate the feedback on the bottle color. I imagine we will add something to the label to indicate the color (any suggestions?) - it would take a lot to convince my wife- the image person to change the bottle color though. The thinking on the blue bottle was to make it reminisent of a turn of the century medicine bottle. We also took note that there are hardy any blue bottles in the liquor store so we figure it will stand out. Last we wanted to minimize feuille morte which seems to happen very quickly in the intense Colorado sun. Its taken much work to get a blue colored glass (without having to buy 10 pallets as Tricor Braun suggested we do- "sure Tricor no problem!").

 

Speaking of fuille morte- I notice many of the Absinthes comming out lately are in clear bottles and I am wondering if browning on the self is an issue with these? I always thought it was a light related phenomenon, but I also notice exposure to air also causes it to excelerate. I would like to understand this more. Anyone have any comment on this?

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I imagine we will add something to the label to indicate the color (any suggestions?)

Calling it a Verte on the label will avoid any confusion. As it stands right now, the only other blue bottle on the market belongs to one of the market heavyweights, La Clandestine, which is a blanche (or "la bleue" in Switzerland). Putting it another way, most absintheurs equate blue with blanche, and have for well over a century. So I would definitely put Verte on the label! Out of curiosity, what does the color look like of a verte absinthe seen through blue glass?

 

Speaking of fuille morte- I notice many of the Absinthes comming out lately are in clear bottles and I am wondering if browning on the self is an issue with these? I always thought it was a light related phenomenon, but I also notice exposure to air also causes it to excelerate. I would like to understand this more. Anyone have any comment on this?

If you read through the forum here, you'll see it talked about with many of the brands which use clear bottles. Specifically, the older bottles and formulation of the Vieux Carre. It's also been noted in the Delaware Phoenix absinthes, as well as the Parisienne lineup (La Coquette, et al). I know the VC bottles have a UV treatment in order to help mitigate the dead leaf. I can't remember if that's just the new bottles or the older ones too. The DP absinthes do not use a UV treatment. A lot of the dead leaf can be attributed to heavy coloration, but there are a ton of variables, like filtration, stabilizers, proof, oxidation, temperature, storage conditions (exposure to direct sunlight in a liquor store window), etc. Read this thread. Most vertes are bottled in dark wine bottles. Some go even further. Bryan's Obsello uses a black champagne bottle with UV coating. Most blanches are bottled in clear glass.

 

Keep in mind that it's 100% impossible to keep a naturally colored verte from turning dead leaf (which, strictly in my own opinion, isn't a bad thing, but still is very odd for a young absinthe). Some do it over a longer period of time, and some do it relatively quickly. Check out the Matter absinthes here for discussion on their very long lasting green.

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Assuming you have investors.

And a conveniently located distillery. :laugh:

 

If I was still living in South Carolina, I could have put you in touch with several 'small scale' distillers. :shifty:

Edited by uglybiker

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Greetings Everyone,

 

We are indeed very close now. Last weekends distillation went exceedingly well. Very clean, very thick louche. I hope to have Trinity on select Colorado shelves and online in the next few months - I wish I had a firm date for everyone here, but, if there is one thing I've learned from the whole experience with the TTB its patience. We've made the best of it and perfected our recipe and process in the meantime though, so I really can't complain.

 

If you are in Northern Colorado send us a personal message. We would be happy to show you the distillery.

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Hi there /wave .

 

I am excited to try your brew, and am always excited to see another American entry into the world of absinthe (and distillation in general).

 

A green, and 'green' absinthe... in a blue bottle- I agree with Joe. My mind is perplexed... but intrigued. Your marketing hath worked so far on me!

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I knew I moved to Colorado for a reason...

 

I mean, aside from the fact I was dragged here by my parents when I was 11. It's because local absinthe and I are fated to be together forever... :cheerz:

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Welcome aboard! Looking forward to trying your absinthe. :)

 

I have to agree with Ron - you may want to either rethink the bottle color or make it more obvious on the label what type of absinthe the buyer is getting themself into. Looking at just the picture of the bottle, all I could think was, "Hills?" If I just saw it on a shelf or that pic on a web-site, I'd probably have passed it on by purely on reflex action.

 

 

I appreciate the feedback on the bottle color. I imagine we will add something to the label to indicate the color (any suggestions?) - it would take a lot to convince my wife- the image person to change the bottle color though. The thinking on the blue bottle was to make it reminisent of a turn of the century medicine bottle. We also took note that there are hardy any blue bottles in the liquor store so we figure it will stand out.

 

 

 

To a small degree, I thought some of the same things as Scott. However, I fully understand your reasonings... except that it is a verte. Blue bottle, to me anyway, has always screamed something is clear- be it CLB, or Bombay Sapphire. The bottle most invoked the image of North Shore's bottles, both in shape and in style/labeling. Looking like North Shore isn't a problem, mind you, but something to think about.

 

I am not sure we could convince you to convince your wife to change the color of your bottle, but I will make this single note/attempt-

 

When I go to a liquor store, and buy this beautiful, pretty blue bottle (of absinthe), take it home, pop the cork, nose it in the bottle, sigh with joy... and then pour out a GREEN booze from it- it may off-put some folks. I think it would me.

 

Especially if the bottle doesn't make it absolutely clear "Hey- this stuff is green on the inside", haha!

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I think the biggest problem that you'll end up combatting with absinthe bottling/labeling in general is that many people in-the-know have realized that if the bottle looks really cool, it's usually either terrible or not absinthe at all, which is a shame. Absinthe has a good deal of period art that it can draw from and can make for some wonderful graphic directions...but sadly terrible companies end up with good marketing to sell their snake oil and that makes it hard to introduce a modern design to the game. Point in case: I spent forever researching Lucid because of their bottle design, because I was convinced that it couldn't POSSIBLY be legit due to the labeling. Luckily, being able to start with the the local Colorado market who are used to seeing attractively packaged product, it should stand out from the crowd like you've mentioned...and if other drinkers are anything like me, will instantly recognize that your product isn't recognizable, and be more likely to check out what is clearly a new product line.

 

My only worry was that the blue bottle didn't appear to be entirely opaque, so I'm not sure how well the blue will show up once there's a green liquid on the inside. It should undeniably be labeled to specify that it's a verte.

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There are a few Trinity Bottle concept drawings floating around the web - we've changed the design quite a lot since the first blue one.

 

The first release will be in a very dark green bottle with a black wax seal.

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I imagine it will taste/louche the same regardless of what color the glass is. I try not to classify clear as a color. I'd rather have blue bottles than brown.

 

I'd love try a blue absinthe, plenty of blue flowers and fruits out tuere just waiting to lend a hand to the world of absinthe.

Edited by baubel

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Bottles don't impress me as much as the contents. JMHO

 

Or, as Worf was fond of saying, "The bottle is just an empty shell. Do with it what you will." B)

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don't sweat the bottle. If the booze is good, it will sell, and word of mouth will spread the news.

 

Pacifique is a good example of word of forum and taste selling a fine booze. Have I seen more visualy appealing bottles? Yes. Have I tasted a better comercial absinthe? Not yet. I hope to find better stuff to buy, but so far no such luck.

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My statement was that their bottle is TOO good, as a majority of great absinthes don't seem to have much as much thought into their look as they could have, whereas a number of terrible companies unfortunately have cornered the market on terrible booze in pretty wrapping. Luckily companies like Vieux Carre, Tenneyson, Ridge, Fontaine, and (if the current design is anything like the old design, and of course, if the absinthe is tasty) now Trinity are hopefully going to open up the field on attractive bottling that isn't full of terrible.

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