Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Brian Robinson

Barnaby Conrad III

Recommended Posts

Many people aren't familiar the specifics about what constitutes a "liqueur" and tend to lump anything into that category that's not one of the main classes: vodka, whiskey, brandy, rum, gin, etc. If it's a melange of flavors and they don't know what it is, they just call it a liqueur. It's not commonly known that in order to be labeled as a liqueur it must contain a specific amount of sugar.

 

Add to this the fact that the sugar distinction in the US is a relatively recent thing, and in the pre-ban days absinthe was referred to as a liqueur.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. In fact you'll find reference to liqueur douce, forte, alcoolique, etc. extending the meaning one way or another - that is, it was certainly not so concrete a term as people project nowadays. Guichard translated the terms to German and English back in the mid-1890s as a common term in the distillery; a "liquor cordial, cordial water."

 

Fritsch gives a brief history of « liqueurs » in his Traité de la Fabrication. Here's an excerpt:

On désigne communément sous le nom de liqueurs les eaux-de-vie en général et les boissons spiritueuses autres que le vin et les liquides vineux. Cette acception n'est pas exacte; car il y a une distinction fondamentale entre les eaux-de-vie et les liqueurs proprement dites: les premières résultent de la distillation du vin ou de tout autre liquide fermenté; les secondes sont préparées à l'exclusion de la fermentation par un mélange d'alcool, d'eau, de parfums et le plus souvent de sucre dans des proportions heureuses, de manière à former un tout homogène, agréable et hygiénique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liqueur? I hardly knew her!

 

That's actually quite interesting and it's good to know, since I could see myself getting confused if I ever delve into serious historical booze texts.

 

I read Absinthe: History in a Bottle myself just a couple of months ago. I thought it was an excellent perspective on the folks that drank it, and the political and social context of absinthe's first century.

Edited by Green Baron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had it for years. It is a great read. As a matter of fact, I may have to get a second copy seeing as my wife made is less of a coffee table book and more of a coffee absorbtion tool. :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×