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Chris

Amer Picon

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Oh, and they also carry Amer Picon, which is practically impossible to find on this side of the pond, but which is integral in many classic cocktails.

 

Do you have any idea how the modern Amer Picon compares to the old suff?

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Oh, and they also carry Amer Picon, which is practically impossible to find on this side of the pond, but which is integral in many classic cocktails.

 

Do you have any idea how the modern Amer Picon compares to the old suff?

 

And how does it compare with Torani Amer, which is often promoted as a good substitute?

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I tend to agree with Jamie Boudreau regarding Torani. It's not the same beast. It makes a fine cocktail, but it doesn't have the same flavor profile.

 

Thanks to Joe Riley (who notified me of the blog post) I actually used his recipe to mimic the flavors of Amer Picon until I found out I could get it from whiskyexchange.

 

As to whether is has the same flavor as the old stuff, I couldn't tell you, since I haven't had the chance to try it. However, in the blog post mentioned above, it seems like it's close enough.

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And how does it compare with Tori Amos, which is often promoted as a good substitute?

I prefer the older stuff.

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Tori Welles?

 

Oh, and they also carry Amer Picon, which is practically impossible to find on this side of the pond, but which is integral in many classic cocktails.

 

Do you have any idea how the modern Amer Picon compares to the old suff?

Jamie's tincture recipe is on the page Brian linked. I've had better results from zesting oranges and making "orange-cello"*.

 

I tasted the Amer Picon mentioned in Jamie's anecdote**. His recipe comes damned close to the modern Amer Picon, but slightly short of the mark on the old recipe.

 

 

 

 

 

* For the record, I disapprove of the growing trend of naming random fruit-infused spirits by adding "cello" after the English fruit name. "-ello" is an Italian suffix connoting the affectionate diminutive. Thecello variant is only used with words ending in "one" or "ona" such as "limone" and "violone". So oranges would make arancello.

 

** Warmed precisely to LeNell's body temperature. Her hip flask did not come from her hip pocket.

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Tori Welles?

 

:yahoo:

 

Maybe even Jennifer Welles, if you like 'em really old.*

 

 

 

 

*Wonderful...now every time I see the title of this thread, my warped brain interprets it as 'American Porn'. :paperbag3:

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His recipe comes damned close to the modern Amer Picon, but slightly short of the mark on the old recipe.

You've tasted from an "old" bottle/sample?

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Yeah, it can be rough. I normally only order from there when the size of the order can minimize the impact of the shipping.

 

Speaking of which, I was just about to order two bottle of the newest 'Strongest Beer in the World' (41% abv) from the UK, but the shipping was 40 pounds for a 330 ml bottle. It just wasn't worth it.

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I'm finally getting my lazy self around to whipping up a batch of Amer Boudreau, following the recipe in the link above. My dilemma now is whether to use dried orange peel or fresh orange zest for the tincture. The recipe calls for dry, but Gwydion seems to have had better results with fresh. I can see how the flavor would be more intense with fresh, but I've also read that the shelf life of the tincture might be longer with dry. Anyone else care to share their view?

 

Also, Gwydion, you recommend using "orangecello" in place of the tincture, but 'cello typically has sugar (simple syrup) added whereas the tincture is unsweetened. Also, 'cellos are typically brought down to a lower ABV (with the addition of simple syrup) than the 100 proof tincture. I assume you're talking about fresh zest macerated in high proof vodka or Everclear, which is then (if necessary) cut with pure water afterward to get a 100-proof mixture?

 

Thanks in advance for any help.

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Old Amer Picon recipes contain calamus (which is not GRAS), which is certainly one reason why it can't be had in original form.

Does anyone know when GRAS laws first came into effect?

 

Also, my French cavist laughs at the idea that American bartenders want Picon - in France it is considered on about the same level as MD20/20 or Olde English 800, something for the gueux to spike their beer with to make a cheap drink stronger.

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I'm finally getting my lazy self around to whipping up a batch of Amer Boudreau, following the recipe in the link above. My dilemma now is whether to use dried orange peel or fresh orange zest for the tincture. The recipe calls for dry, but Gwydion seems to have had better results with fresh. I can see how the flavor would be more intense with fresh, but I've also read that the shelf life of the tincture might be longer with dry. Anyone else care to share their view?

 

I haven't read the recipe so I don't know what all goes into it, but perhaps you could do two batches, one with dried orange peel and another with fresh orange zest for side by side comparisons.

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Boudreau's recipe for the replica of Amer Picon is in Brian's post above:

 

I actually used his recipe to mimic the flavors of Amer Picon...

 

I like the idea of doing a side-by-side comparison, but my supplies of some of the ingredients are limited. Guess I'll have to choose one method or the other.

 

Here's another question, though. What variety of orange should peel/zest come from? The standard sweet (Navel/Valencia) orange or the sour/Seville orange? Hmmm...

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Yeah, that sounds good. I believe Boudreau originally intended to use (dried) bitter orange peel, but bought the wrong kind. I'm not even sure that that's available around here; I've just seen dried Valencia peel.

 

The local grocery has "sour oranges" for sale. Not advertised as Seville, but I'm guessing they're close enough.

 

Would doing a blend of both fresh and dried be a bad idea?

 

It had crossed my mind. Decisions, decisions...

 

Thanks for the input, guys. I'll let ya know how it turns out.

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Yeah, that sounds good. I believe Boudreau originally intended to use (dried) bitter orange peel, but bought the wrong kind. I'm not even sure that that's available around here; I've just seen dried Valencia peel.

 

The local grocery has "sour oranges" for sale. Not advertised as Seville, but I'm guessing they're close enough.

 

Would doing a blend of both fresh and dried be a bad idea?

 

It had crossed my mind. Decisions, decisions...

 

Thanks for the input, guys. I'll let ya know how it turns out.

 

 

 

In my experience, Fresh peel is not going to give you any more of a "fresh" flavor. The ability of the fresh peel to release its flavor, is, however, diminished.

 

I have been making my own from scratch. Skipping the Ramazotti, I make tinctures of Cinchona, gentian, orange peel, and calamus. I mix these together, dilute with a little water and plenty of darkly caramelized sugar. I throw that onto some toasted oak chips for a few days and bottle.

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Thanks for the input, but you're too late--I've got fresh Seville orange peel macerating in Everclear as we speak. It smells terrific!

 

In my experience, Fresh peel is not going to give you any more of a "fresh" flavor. The ability of the fresh peel to release its flavor, is, however, diminished.

 

Not sure I understand the above statement. Do you mean that the ability of dried peel to release its flavor is diminished? That would be in line with what I've read and one of the reasons why I elected to use fresh peel. I'm an impatient guy and liked the idea of a quick infusion of two weeks or so as opposed to a longer one of a couple of months. My main concern with using the fresh peel was that the resulting tincture would have a shorter shelf life.

 

I have been making my own from scratch. Skipping the Ramazotti, I make tinctures of Cinchona, gentian, orange peel, and calamus. I mix these together, dilute with a little water and plenty of darkly caramelized sugar. I throw that onto some toasted oak chips for a few days and bottle.

 

Sounds interesting. And complicated.

 

I appreciate everyone's advice! I'll let you know how everything turns out in a few weeks...

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Decanted the Seville orange tincture today, brought it down to 100 proof with spring water, and mixed it with the other ingredients for the amer Boudreau. One week to go...

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