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1SubSailor

Nice video and where did he get that Fountain!?!

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The only mistake I noticed was the reference to star anise...otherwise, it was great to see a video like that featuring several excellent absinthes.

 

And yes, a very interesting fountain indeed.

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I haven't seen that fountain for sale in quite awhile. I do remember it being very expensive. It's too modern for my tastes. I enjoyed the video. It was was well done with no BS.

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Yeah, I don't want to nitpick the video to death, but only because he's got it mostly right. And he's not shilling for anyone. He's honest, if not just a hair misinformed (star anise, abv, proportions, 10min louche).

 

I like the video. The production effort is very nicely done, the brand represented are some of my favorites (it's not a secret that I'm no fan of St. George, but at least it's absinthe! Pernod... well, I'm definitely not a fan of that mess.)

 

That fountain is out of this world! I want one.

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The fountain is from Markus at absinthe.de, and is $1,564.11 based on today's euro. It strikes me less as modern and more "moderne" i.e., an homage to the Art Deco style, with perhaps a strong splash of International design style (Bauhaus). I'm not a fan.

 

Jim Meehan is nothing if not sincere, and is one of the real rock star bartenders; he did a panel discussion on absinthe in cocktails with Paul Clarke and me a few years ago at Tales. This illustrates the damage that a few completely uninformed/misinformed brand reps can do. I'm starting to see more brands boasting about star anise as if it's a good thing. Same with the unnecessarily exaggerated slow drip.

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I was born and raised in Miami, which boasts the largest number of art deco buildings in the world. I suppose I'm a fan of the style. I agree it's got an aire of Bauhas to it, and admittedly I'm not normally a fan of modern design, but I do like the fountain. Oddly enough, the product page on Markus' site makes the thing look less than desirable. Goes to show you what good photography can do to aide in marketing the product, and conversely, what bad photography can do.

 

But the fountain. It's form and function! The sugar cubes housed in the top, and the ability to hang the spoons and tongs on it? And a carry handle?! Seems like a must for social situations. Definitely overblown for personal home use.

 

But I can dig that it's not everyone's cup of tea.

 

Funny thing about that ridiculously slow drip. I can see where some specific brand reps may suggest that, in order to best coax a super weak louche. Definitely not necessary for star anise, as looking at it hard enough will cause it to louche. Crapola.

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Oops. Thought I linked it.

 

I was born and raised in Miami, which boasts the largest number of art deco buildings in the world. I suppose I'm a fan of the style.

I did not know that.

 

I love art deco, I just loathe Bauhaus. I feel like it took the life out of environmental design and we've had to deal with stark geometry for decades. In recent years an appreciation for classic design seems to have been returning though, thank goodness.

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Architectural modernism, and geometry, isn't so bad in my book. One of my favorite buildings is the Price Tower in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. It was built in the '50s and was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright; his only skyscraper. The Wright-designed apartments on the upper floors are now really awesome hotel rooms, and the Copper Bar up there is fab. The Classen building in OKC is modeled after it, and is also across the street from the gold dome, designed by Buckminster Fuller, which I always thought was a planetarium until I went there with Bill and Precious. There's a fabulous bar in the dome which happens to serve absinthe.

 

I admit that the use of curious geometry leads to even curiouser design elements. Tiny, odd-shaped doorways in the apartments in the Price Tower are one example of the downsides to the style.

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The fountain is on loan to PDT from Tempus Fugit Spirits, as were the antique topette and Spanish-made drippers. The fountain is also featured on the 2009 Tales of the Cocktail poster, as a tribute to the bartender and bar by his friends who helped design it (he won Best American Bartender and his bar, PDT won World's Best Cocktail Bar for 2009).

The poster shows the logo of PDT engraved on the bartender's shaker, so it actually predicted both of these wins before the results at Tales. But I digress.

 

The fountain is massively over-engineered, and thus prohibitively expensive, but there is no fountain today that can be more precisely adjusted for the drip. The French maker has made some more prototypes that have a more Art Nouveau look.

The glasses in the still-shot are Simon Pearce for Tempus Fugit, also provided for the shoot.

Jim was well (and correctly) briefed before this video was shot, his reference to star anis was more of a slip on his part, as he had alot of information to digest before being filmed and he knows the difference.

 

Sometimes things don't go 100% to your plans with the Media/Press - imagine that?

He has for some time typically used Vieux Pontarlier in drips and Sazeracs and also has Duplais at his bar.

Edited by pierreverte

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Yeah, I was stoked to see the Duplais there too. I like the video and I like Jim. Good stuff!

 

Sometimes things don't go 100% to your plans with the Media/Press - imagine that?

No doubt! Nevertheless, the message of the video was quite clear and very non-bullshit, and that makes up for slips any day.

 

And I noticed the precision on the drip. It took quite a few turns for the water to begin dripping, which is vastly superior to a quarter turn on a normal spigot that goes from nothing to full stream.

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The fountain is massively over-engineered, and thus prohibitively expensive, but there is no fountain today that can be more precisely adjusted for the drip. The French maker has made some more prototypes that have a more Art Nouveau look.

 

Thanks for your post...very interesting. Again, I thought the video was very well done and it gladdens my heart to know that a real top-flight mixologist is making regular use of Vieux Pontarlier and other fine absinthes.

 

I wish I could afford "Der Rolls-Royce unter den Absinthefontainen," but for now I'll just have to admire it from afar. I'll watch for those new French prototypes you mentioned.

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I have to say, it's a pleasure to see actual absinthe in an absinthe prep video done to such a high quality!

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Jim was well (and correctly) briefed before this video was shot, his reference to star anis was more of a slip on his part, as he had alot of information to digest before being filmed and he knows the difference.

 

Sometimes things don't go 100% to your plans with the Media/Press - imagine that?

No, they certainly don't. Thanks for the clarification.

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For maximum coldness I use a cocktail shaker until my hands are frozen. Then I can add water as fast as I want. I'm still a boneheaded fan of the ultra-slow drip when using a fountain, but I have nowhere to put one where I'm currently living except for in storage, so I use a sports bottle. Using a dripper in this chaotic mess I call a house is just tempting fate.

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My understanding is that the slow drip was also part of the social ritual. Folks would sit at a table and converse while leisurely watering their Absinthe. Kind of a French thing I guess.

Edited by eric

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That's why I'm a fan of the slow drip. The building anticipation is fertile breeding ground for totally random conversations.

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My understanding is that the slow drip was also part of the social ritual. Folks would sit at a table and converse while leisurely watering their Absinthe. Kind of a French thing I guess.

 

 

Hell of an idea, and I've seen it happen once or twice. ;)

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My understanding is that the slow drip was also part of the social ritual. Folks would sit at a table and converse while leisurely watering their Absinthe.

Not unlike the ritual of letting a Guinness settle for 5 minutes while you talk about the craic.

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I was under the impression that Simon designed the fountain as well, but I see I was wrong, thanks Peter. I had a lot of fun playing with that fountain and drinking VP one night there last year, after the Absinthe in April event. Don't know if I was supposed to be tinkering with it or not!

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