Jump to content

 

Photo

To cure what ails you


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Martin Lake

Martin Lake

    The Great Lover of Mankind

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,163 posts

Posted 18 January 2010 - 06:31 PM

A friend of mine recently turned me on to making my own gravlax at home, and suffice to say, I was amazed. It's easy and the end results are better by far than any lox you're likely to buy in the store. To that end, here is the recipe he sent me:

1 lb Salmon fillet.
4 oz. salt (the coarser the better)
4 oz. sugar
lots of pepper

That's the basic cure. Now you can experiment. The classic gravlax taste is straight up dill, but I'm neither wild about dill nor classicism, so to this, I added:

2 tbs jamaican curry powder
4 tbs allspice, coarsely ground

Thoroughly mix the salt and spices together, then apply to the fish. Give it a good rub into the fish...there'll be more than enough salt and whatnot to cover the fish. Then wrap the whole thing in enough plastic wrap to cover the whole thing six times over. When it's wrapped, put it into a dish to catch the fluids, press it down with a cast iron skillet or similar weight, and let it sit for at least three days. I gave it five and it was perfect.

Seriously, give this a try. The end results are delicious, and there's something kind of miraculous about watching a salmon fillet turn to lox.

Now you: I'm sure some of you cure meat. I want to know how.

Edited by Martin Lake, 18 January 2010 - 07:48 PM.

Ah, la petite mort; such beautiful suicide.

#2 Attack Accountant

Attack Accountant

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,004 posts

Posted 18 January 2010 - 07:29 PM

Well, I've never cured meat but I might give it a try now.
I think I'm funny but no one else does.

#3 Mat B.

Mat B.

    The Gentleman of Verona

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,299 posts

Posted 19 January 2010 - 04:06 AM

That'll be added to the WS Cook book :)
"I will show you something different from either Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you; I will show you fear in a handful of dust."
-The Waste Land

“…and it’s appropriate to serve them, as long as you serve them appropriately.”
-Jules

#4 kaseijin

kaseijin

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 196 posts

Posted 20 January 2010 - 10:10 AM

I have wanted to try curing my own guanciale. Maybe this will give me enough drive to get off my ass and do it. :laugh:

#5 Gruene Fee

Gruene Fee

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 337 posts

Posted 20 January 2010 - 11:57 AM

What's the best temperature/environment at which to cure meat, particularly salmon for the above recipe?
"The collective strength of our Bullshit Detectors is practically a force of nature." -Gwydion

#6 Martin Lake

Martin Lake

    The Great Lover of Mankind

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,163 posts

Posted 20 January 2010 - 04:03 PM

It actually does fine in the fridge. Other cured meats can be somewhat more finicky if I understand it, particularly where a threat of botulism comes into play, but for this, you're fine just leaving it in the fridge. I have a similar recipe for a duck bresaola that is the same way.
Ah, la petite mort; such beautiful suicide.

#7 Blue Star

Blue Star

    Newcomer

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 38 posts

Posted 12 November 2011 - 10:56 AM

I have made gravlax fairly regularly ever since moving back to the USA from Sweden about 15 years ago. I make loads of it every News Years for our annual open-house New Years Day brunch.

A couple comments on the classic recipe: use kosher rock salt or coarse sea salt; pepper to taste, but not black pepper, traditionally it would be white pepper; and also traditionally you add a couple teaspoons of aquavit or brandy; if you use dill, it must be fresh; coriander works well too.

I use two glass rectangular baking dishes. Place one filet skin side down in a dish, a layer of sugar-salt-spice mixture, and then the other filet skin side up, smearing any residual mixture on top. Cover with plastic wrap to seal the dish. Place the other dish on top, right-side-up, and fill with heavy things like cans and jars of food. In the refrigerator for 2-3 days, flipping the pair of filets and marinating in between with extracted juices once or twice a day.

Now for the non traditional part: instead of aquavit, you can substitute other bitters, and I know of some that have used Swedish Besk, which contains wormwood. If you consider that aquavit is traditionally made from caraway, cumin, anise, and fennel, what does that suggest? Why not use ABSINTHE! So, that is MY special gravlax recipe, which I encourage you to try. You should put the ABSINTHE in straight, but obviously you should use much less than for aquavit. Typically, for a large double-sided fillet, I will use 1/4 cup of salt, 1/3 cup of sugar, a few grinds of white pepper, and 1 oz of ABSINTHE. Bon Appetit!

A friend of mine recently turned me on to making my own gravlax at home, and suffice to say, I was amazed. It's easy and the end results are better by far than any lox you're likely to buy in the store. To that end, here is the recipe he sent me:

1 lb Salmon fillet.
4 oz. salt (the coarser the better)
4 oz. sugar
lots of pepper

That's the basic cure. Now you can experiment. The classic gravlax taste is straight up dill, but I'm neither wild about dill nor classicism, so to this, I added:

2 tbs jamaican curry powder
4 tbs allspice, coarsely ground

Thoroughly mix the salt and spices together, then apply to the fish. Give it a good rub into the fish...there'll be more than enough salt and whatnot to cover the fish. Then wrap the whole thing in enough plastic wrap to cover the whole thing six times over. When it's wrapped, put it into a dish to catch the fluids, press it down with a cast iron skillet or similar weight, and let it sit for at least three days. I gave it five and it was perfect.

Seriously, give this a try. The end results are delicious, and there's something kind of miraculous about watching a salmon fillet turn to lox.

Now you: I'm sure some of you cure meat. I want to know how.


Edited by Blue Star, 12 November 2011 - 11:16 AM.

Imbibing and distilling!

http://quincystreetdistillery.com



1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright © 2014 The Wormwood Society Absinthe Association