Jump to content
reflexive

Do different absinthes give different effects?

Recommended Posts

I answered the OP stating that YES that a unique absinthe buzz does exist and YES certain brands can be more efficient in delivering this buzz.

For you. What has been repeatedly demonstrated is that since everyone's experiences are unique, it's completely useless to try to give advice to another person about which brands to buy for better effect. Trying to advise on the subject is a mystical pursuit, not based on anything tangible at all.

 

Yes the effects are minimal, who cares, no reason to avoid the question or lie to the guy.

Oh really? Really? So we're lying and avoiding the question? Really? You'd better point to where someone did if you're going to say shit like that.

 

I do argue that the wormwood is responsible for a portion of the secondary effects.

You can't argue that without some sort of facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absinthe's unique secondary effects come after an interaction with the chemical content of the drink with your brain. The interaction will depend on the 5 factors listed:

1. Specific chemical content of drink

2. Rate of consumption

3. Amount consumed vs user's alcohol tolerance

4. Tolerance gained to the chemicals themselves

5. Genetic components of user. ie. receptor quantity / properties, etc, natural resistance etc

 

So to answer your question,

I postulate that if say, Ted were to produce a more potent version of NO (meaning this new version contains more of these chemicals), it is fair to assume secondary effects will be easier to experience, while sacrificing the spirit's drinkability. It might also be said that a user could have a "stronger" experience. However, this lies on the assumption that our brain chemistry will allow more of an ingredient to have more of an effect. Our brain's have a limited number of receptors, and many pathways have maximum and minimum thresholds. More of a chemical might not produce a stronger effect.

 

Then you can argue that one product will provide you with enough chemicals to "max" out, while another product provides you with a low dose.

 

 

In absinthe's case, AND wormwood's case, I've come to believe there is a cap. Or, in other words, a certain state a person can reach given the proper chemical content. If you are given an excess level of chemical content no heightened effects are felt. Basically there is a limit to how strong the "absinthe buzz" can be.

 

Also at work in absinthe, we have the alcohol. Hence, secondary effects will rely on how they chemicals effect the brain with alcohol. Hence, effects might be altered via amount of alcohol consumed. There could be some "perfect balance" at work here, making some brands more "potent" than others.

 

It seems simple enough to test the theory, if someone really wanted to. Maybe someone out there already has. There are a number of tests / experiments a producer could do with their distillate.

 

...

 

I don't think I've said anything new here. We know absinthes have a specific herbal concentration. More work has to be done to understand how absinthe's contents interact with the mind before rash conclusions can be made, such as "its all in your mind" or "you can get the same effect from herbal tea."

 

I think what really pisses people off is that there isn't enough science to back up either side. I can only offer conclusions based on personal experiences and at-home experiments.

 

Is it too hard to believe that injestion of a concentrated dose of chemicals found in absinthe, without alcohol, would lead to a "clear minded," "wide awake," buzz???? Well, I gave it a shot, and what do you know.

Edited by Zzz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regardless of what "effects" you feel from absinthe, I was wondering how many seem to be affected very quickly, as I do. It seems as though by the third sip, i am feeling pretty darn good. For comparison, I have sometimes drank 2 rum&cokes or Vodka/Sevens and felt cheated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still waiting to know where someone lied to the OP.

 

I'm not going to believe any results from your "experiment" with smoking wormwood. I've known people who smoked grass clippings and thought they were smoking high quality pot and got high as a kite. One person, no control group, expectations going in, and a delivery method completely different from drinking distilled absinthe of an at least partially different substance (distilled wormwood is missing components of undistilled wormwood, not to mention the presence of a lot of other chemicals from other herbs and alcohol). It's not proof, it's not evidence, it's not anything.

 

The entire point is that we haven't and we're not afraid of saying, "here's what we think and why, but we really don't know." And you don't know either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The interaction will depend on the 5 factors listed:

1. Specific chemical content of drink

2. Rate of consumption

3. Amount consumed vs user's alcohol tolerance

4. Tolerance gained to the chemicals themselves

5. Genetic components of user. ie. receptor quantity / properties, etc, natural resistance etc

You forgot one of the most important ones:

6. Psychosomatic effects

 

With an effect that is so negligable as being just a 'clear headed' buzz, it's quite easy to fake oneself into thinking they are experiencing said effects.

 

I've done these experiments on several groups of people in the past.

 

In every case, people who thought they were drinking a high thujone absinthe (but who were really drinking absente) reported effects. Those who were actually drinking 'high thujone', low anethole absinthe (but thought they were drinking a low thujone bitters) reported little effect. Those who were drinking absente and knew they were drinking absente reported about the same amount of effect as group two.

 

I've done close to a dozen variations of the same experiment, and the results are the same each time.

 

 

In absinthe's case, AND wormwood's case, I've come to believe there is a cap.

So, what about the issues with wormwood extracts, which don't give any 'effects'? Aside from maybe some nice renal failure. ;)

 

 

So to answer your question,

You still didn't answer the question. The effects can be felt with product that don't have wormwood. Products like wormwood distillate don't create those effects. You haven't answered how your opinion can go against those points yet still be true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×