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TheGreenOne

Chartreuse Question

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While I definitely could not refuse anything that girl asked me to shoot, I have to wonder about this:

You can sort of think of Chartreuse as the French version of Jagermeister

Does that mean I should expect to see shitfaced french college girls on spring break in Nice doing shooters of Chartreuse and then getting topless on the bar?

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I have yet to see shitfaced french girls from france then dance around topless... I never saw any shitfaced chicks in france... but half the chicks on the beach were topless. However, there are high girls and tipsy girls in night clubs. However, in Paris, I have seen shitfaced tourist Scadinavian high school girls with bottles that were starting to remove stuff in Montmarte... but hotel staff had to run in and close the window. However, in areas of town I typically stay, I never saw anything like that.

 

For getting drunk, there is this thing called vodka, actually or really high quality tequilla, even better, effeciant, effective, does what you need with several small shots, doesn't create a beer belly and the hangover is not as bad. Getting drunk on anything else would be a waste of good alcohol.

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I like Chartreuse, so thhppp.

 

If there are any cocktail fans in here besides Drinkboy (and myself), you might find Chartreuse more palatable in a cocktail.

 

Can't vouch for the following, but I found it in Paul Harrington's out-of-print Cocktail: The Drinks Bible For The 21st Century. The drink rates high on the taste-complexity scale according to Harrington, who also says:

 

"Few other cocktails will travel so well with you through life."

 

The Drink Without a Name

2 ounces vodka

1/4 ounce Cointreau

1/8 ounce Chartreuse

 

Stir well with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

 

Harrington says the drink makes a nice finish to a spicy meal, particularly Indian curries.

_____________________________

 

And there's this one, from Audrey "Libation Goddess" Saunders:

 

Tantris Sidecar

1 oz Courvoisier VS Cognac

1/2 oz Busnel Calvados (or other good quality Calvados)

1/2 oz Cointreau

1/2 oz Fresh Lemon Juice

1/2 oz Simple Syrup (1-to-1)

1/4 oz Pineapple Juice

1/4 oz Green Chartreuse

Garnish: Lemon Twist

 

Sugar half the rim on a martini glass. Measure all ingredients into a mixing glass, add ice, shake well, and strain into martini glass. Garnish with a big lemon twist.

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I like Chartreuse, so thhhh-p-p-p-p.

 

If there are any cocktail fans in here besides Drinkboy (and myself), you might find Chartreuse more palatable in a supporting role.

 

Can't vouch for the following, but I'm intrigued. It appears in Paul Harrington's out-of-print Cocktail: The Drinks Bible For The 21st Century.  The drink rates high on the taste-complexity scale according to Harrington, who goes on to say:

 

"....your taste buds may cower when first hit with this drink. But take a second sip and reconsider: Few other cocktails will travel so well with you through life."

 

 

I have always liked Chartreuses as well. I have only had the green. I think it is best served after dinner with espresso on the side. I have also enjoyed it mixed with tonic.

 

Once a friend in Dallas tasted from my glass. He complained about the strength and proceed to set my glass of Chartreuse on fire. A complete waste of alcohol. Luckily there was nobody there to document and propagate the "Dallas Chartreuse Fire Ritual." :no-czechs3:

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I can practically hear the eyes rolling over my Chartreuse cocktail post. :D

 

Brak, there's a whole mess of people out there just dyin' to light your drink. Stay alert, and be ready to lay down the law.

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I can practically hear the eyes rolling over my Chartreuse cocktail post.

I don't think so. Pensieve and I tried the "The Drink Without a Name" at the highly recommended Zig Zag cafe in Seattle a few weeks back and I really enjoyed it. I also liked "The Last Word." One of the cool things about Drinkboy's site is that you can click on a product and get info on it as well as links to drinks using it.

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Please, excuse me if I didn't get in time but I have contacted several people made a small research and assuming good distillation Chartreuse should have 3.6mg/l of thujone and as I have read you are mentioning slivovitz you should check our Łącka sliwowica to get the real taste and aroma and in Poland it is distilled since the medieval times :cheers:

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...you just haven't been hanging around in the right bars then :->

Where is that place again?

 

Didn't mean to ignore your question Hiram... it's in Atlanta

 

http://www.spicerestaurant.com/

 

http://atlanta.citysearch.com/profile/11432446

 

-Robert

Well now. Spice is just a few blocks from my office. Hmmmm.

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the range for Chartreuse goes in such a way:

 

Chartreuse jaune thujone: - anethole: 31.68

Chartreuse verte thujone: 3.6 anethole: 5.28

Chartreuse blanche thujone: 4.83 anethole: -

 

I am updating my list of thujone and anethole concentrations in various alcoholic beverages (it is 26 so far of the most well-known) so if anyone is curious about something, please feel free to ask and if anyone has a suggestion of checking something that is not on the list, you are more than welcome

Edited by absinthist

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Also, I have checked in various places how is the thing with 130 herb recipe and it seems that modern one uses very few of them so the situation has changed a lot, a far as hyssop is concerned, it is used in very small quantity for jaune but in a huge one for verte. The same happens with Benedictine, here however certain ingredients were discontinued due to their carcinogenity.

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Somebody did just that, not all that long ago.

 

I forgot where I saw it posted.

 

Not that I'd mind a visit from a Carthusian brother, mind you.

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Only two of them know the original recipe so it may be somewhere but they do not seem to be using it anymore and probably at certain age they are forgetting more and more. In fact, the very first recipe got lost but someone has re written it and could have changed. It is impossible to find the ONE they are using at present so they will not be paying any visit. Apart from recipe, the methods of production is another guarded secret, so since you get the recipe, it is just the first of 39 steps :cheers:

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It would still be too sweet, blanche or verte.

 

I'd like to taste Chartreuse sugarless.

 

Mmmmm, Calvados.

 

If you love Calvados, you owe it to yourself to try Gale's Prize Old Ale, Prole.

 

It truly is the Calvados of strong ales.

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