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Delaware Phoenix Distillery

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Poetic, to be sure. But I know you strive to understand it as well. And I'm sure you know that understanding and appreciating are not mutually exclusive.

 

Drink more...

Cheers to that. You don't need to tell me twice.

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After read all the reviews about this brand, I decided its time to order a bottle, so next pay check I am. I cant wait to try something new :devil:

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Poetic, to be sure. But I know you strive to understand it as well. And I'm sure you know that understanding and appreciating are not mutually exclusive.

 

Drink more...

Cheers to that. You don't need to tell me twice.

Sometimes the effects are more obvious... more obvious that they are more abrupt. Under these cirumstances an alteration in color and the corresponding alteration in taste are easy to connect, and have been - take what Duplais had to say on the subject:

 

"Le soleil et la lumière du jour agissent avec énergie sur les liqueurs. Le soleil ronge les couleurs et les précipite au fond des bouteilles: l'absinthe suisse, qui est restée quelque temps soumise à son action, contracte un goût rance des plus considérables. La lumière attaque aussi les couleurs des liqueurs et les fait déposer.

 

(Les tonneaux pour les grandes quantités, et les vases de grès pour les petites, conviennent infiniment mieux, pour la conservation des liqueurs, que les vases de cuivre étamé ou les bouteilles de verre. Enfin, généralement, les liqueurs acquièrent plus de qualité dans les grands vases que dans les petits.)"

 

This is why we stress storing in the dark, protecting the color and thereby the taste of the absinthe from light and an objectionable turn. So there, there's an account, from the dix-neuvième siècle...

 

Of small makers it's not reasonable to demand long-term resting/ageing now, but we should all hope for the optimal circumstance to arrive where it's possible - and at that time, eventually, you'll be able to accept an absinthe as matured in color, scent and taste as she can be.

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That said, I believe the Delaware absinthes, which I think are the best US offerings, were tooled to be consumed in their youth. But, the Walton Waters has long-term aging potential that makes me wish there were a few batches set aside for a year as a specialty bottling.

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contracte un goût rance des plus considérables

Wow. Rancid even.

 

Of small makers it's not reasonable to demand long-term resting/ageing now, but we should all hope for the optimal circumstance to arrive where it's possible - and at that time, eventually, you'll be able to accept an absinthe as matured in color, scent and taste as she can be.

Perhaps not reasonable, but definitely feasible. With enough lead time and planning it's possible one could have enough in aging tanks, even using a solera method for consistency, to ensure a constant supply of aged absinthes.

 

Using a ceramic aging vessel sounds interesting. I was just talking to someone today about non-reactive aging tanks, or conversely, storage containers which add characteristics like new oak casks (for a short period).

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That said, I believe the Delaware absinthes, which I think are the best US offerings, were tooled to be consumed in their youth. But, the Walton Waters has long-term aging potential that makes me wish there were a few batches set aside for a year as a specialty bottling.

Oddly enough, I've only just got around to ordering a bottle of the Walton Waters. I'll be looking to try that one out when I get back to the States. A specialty aged bottling would be something anyone could dig. Good call.

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I was just talking to someone today about non-reactive aging tanks, or conversely, storage containers which add characteristics like new oak casks (for a short period).

 

You mean like a spent Chardonnay barrel?

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That said, I believe the Delaware absinthes, which I think are the best US offerings....

 

We've got bars here primed here in CO for Delaware Phoenix whenever she's ready.

 

BTW, there's a neat little absinthe bar in Breckenridge that has bottles from the crew.....Vieux Pont., Doubs, Clandestine, Marteau, Pacifique, the Jades, and even a bottle of Helfrich's work.

 

Just missing some of the work from the lovely lady in Upstate NY......and I certainly planted the seed with the proprietor.

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You mean like a spent Chardonnay barrel?

Sort of, except new. :)

 

 

 

 

And I also managed recently to finally buy some Leopold absinthe as well. I went the Schneider route.

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I enjoyed the much earlier stuff I tasted at Bill's house. I'm expecting the same or better, and that's probably an easy bet.

 

It's still a shame that yours and Cheryl's stuff isn't available through DUNY. I'd be stocked up by now. Catskill Cellars did a fantastic job with my first order, so I'm sure I'll be doing more through them. Schneider's on the other hand.. it's hard to get past the added packaging fee. I mean, I did it because it was the only way (now that Mission apparently restricts shipping). Total has always said they won't deliver.

 

Anyhow. I don't want to derail Cheryl's thread!

 

When I last saw my MoL, it was still a nice olive. I'm betting my WW will look similarly amber to the picture that was posted here earlier. Especially since it's still going to be a few months before I can get into it.

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I'm not too sure about the oak barrel aging, it is for me too " reactive". I don't care for the oak signature in wine and I don't think I want it in my absinthe, and now that I have had both DP'S I'm pretty sure I don't want to go there. But thanks to this thread I will put a bottle of each away for a year in a dark closet. If you can make it to Goshen Ct. in that time you can share in the tasting, we will compare with a "fresh" batch.

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Thanks for the good words Todd. Maybe some day I'll get out my stuff out there.

 

Re: containers, whiskey at one time was sold and stored (for saloons) in decorative ceramic containers. Sometimes they appear on the after market. The spirit has inevitably turned.

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One of the local wineries sells their port in a ceramic pint bottle. I've never tried it, and in retrospect they use a semi-matte glaze on the outside...and probably on the inside. I suppose it's possible the type of clay or glaze could affect the flavor...as there are some pretty unstable glazes out there.

 

I was thinking about doing some experimenting with storing absinthe in ceramic containers...about a year ago, but I got distracted and won't have much space to work with here in a few months, but I think it would be interesting to experiment. :cheers:

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...as there are some pretty unstable glazes out there.

 

That's me!

 

 

 

Sorry, it was funny in my head.

 

Edit...and I screwed up the quote again. Laugh on, Brother.

Edited by Attack Accountant

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whiskey at one time was sold and stored (for saloons) in decorative ceramic containers.
One of the local wineries sells their port in a ceramic pint bottle.
Clay jars seem to work wonders on arak.

The Brut d'Alambic comes in a ceramic bottle.

 

 

I screwed up the quote again.

Hahahaha.

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I was given two bottles of 1968 lancers last summer. I remember sipping that stuff when I was a teen.

 

The ceramic bottles should still be around around here somewhere amongst the clutter.

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That said, I believe the Delaware absinthes, which I think are the best US offerings, were tooled to be consumed in their youth. But, the Walton Waters has long-term aging potential that makes me wish there were a few batches set aside for a year as a specialty bottling.

 

I think both DP absinthes have aging potential. I recently finished a bottle of MoL that was about a year old and opened about nine months ago. The color was no longer spectacular, but the flavor was better than ever. When I make my next purchase (soon!), I hope to stash away one bottle for a year or two.

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Maybe I should have worded that differently.

 

I agree, both of DP's absinthes will improve with age. Many absinthes get quirky... lose their balance as certain flavors become more pronounced just as other more choice characteristics, in varying degrees, recede into the background: one can mellow to the point of being uninteresting; another, pleasant a couple months ago, can come out of the dark cabinet after calmly and surreptitiously expanding into a wormwood-freakish-b0mB. The most frustrating, for sure, is the shitty absinthe that sat alone for months on end untouched, only to have a few sparse drams poured during a night of binging and there she is... miss ambrosia.

 

But there's something about the WW that I tasted (I quoted the bottle number somewhere else) that had me thinking it would really pop after a year+, probably for much the same reason certain people favored it less than the MoL young. The MoL would likely exhibit good complexity with long-term age (and be better than the bulk of other commercial absinthes), but I have a feeling it wouldn't have the roundness, the perfume or the more ideal balance that the WW could potentially have.

 

I won't put words into Cheryl's mouth, but I think she bottles and ships exactly what she expects the consumer to drink... if the person on the other end of the sale has the foresight and patience to let that bottle rest and mellow, more power to him/her, but better for the small artisan producer who doesn't have to suspend a significant part of her resources and capital to do it for them. That'll be doable later, with the support of you and me.

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Precisely why I'm building up extra bottles of WW...I sensed they will be amazing in a year or two. It's truly wonderful right out of the bottle, but I sensed some wisdom in there that might develop over time.

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Those were two of my early choices, but I can't say I was ever tickled pink by their flavors.

 

Back then, it was mostly about the thrill of connecting with a beverage cloaked in mystery, and infamy.

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I'm enjoying some Walton Waters (batch 10-6) tonight, and I have to say, this is perhaps the most enjoyable finish I've experienced... So much going on. A gentle pull and tingle that teases one towards the next sip, that you fight because you want to savor the linger...it ends in a powdery citrus tanginess...Man this is good stuff.

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