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Sipping Absinthe :) Watchin' Movies


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#1 AiO

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 01:52 PM

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So a conversation with buddhasynth got me thinking: we have a thread devoted to absinthe and music; we need a thread devoted absinthe and movies.

Not absinthe in movies--already got a thread for that.

But absinthe and movies: Does anybody louche up before they pop in a movie on Friday night? What movies pair well with absinthe? What absinthe pairs well with movies? Seen any good movies lately, absinthe in hand or not?

Discuss.
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#2 baubel

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 01:55 PM

Ever since my bro cut down his consumption, I usually enjoy a dose with a movie, or a couple of episodes of some show. I had a dose or two watching Deconstructing Harry last week.

A little technological fix to a spiritual problem.


#3 Absomphe

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 02:50 PM

I love your photo of Siouxsie Sioux, AIO. ;)

Yes, I'm Krinkles the Clown on an absinthe a beer bender.

You got a problem with that?


#4 AiO

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 05:04 PM

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I love Siouxsie.


But if I may paraphrase Henri Langlois: "There is no Siouxsie Sioux. There is no Karen O. There is only Louise Brooks."
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#5 AiO

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 05:09 PM

I had a dose or two watching Deconstructing Harry last week.


I'm not the biggest Woody Allen fan, but I was able to tolerate Deconstructing Harry. That and Match Point are the last of his I've seen. Heard good things about Vicky Cristina Barcelona, but I'm afraid of getting burned again.

For my money, the best he's done is Zelig.
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#6 Absomphe

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 05:22 PM

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I love Siouxsie.


But if I may paraphrase Henri Langlois: "There is no Siouxsie Sioux. There is no Karen O. There is only Louise Brooks."


Agreed, but throw in a touch of Isabella Rosellini, and Siouxsie is almost Louise's punked out identical twin.

Yes, I'm Krinkles the Clown on an absinthe a beer bender.

You got a problem with that?


#7 baubel

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 06:12 PM

I had a dose or two watching Deconstructing Harry last week.


I'm not the biggest Woody Allen fan, but I was able to tolerate Deconstructing Harry. That and Match Point are the last of his I've seen. Heard good things about Vicky Cristina Barcelona, but I'm afraid of getting burned again.

For my money, the best he's done is Zelig.



Sigh. Where to begin? I labored through Manhattan a number of years ago while watching it with a friend, only to be very amused by a joke at the very end. I saw a good amount of Annie Hall, but haven't actually sat down and watched the whole thing.

My brother got me interested in Deconstructing Harry, because his description of the opening scenes had me real interested. However, it was a real labor because I'd put it on and try to watch it at times when I should have just gone to bed. I fell asleep on it two or three times, at one point, I fell asleep while some woman was yelling at him, and woke up again to find another woman yelling at him. I wasn't in the mood for that much yelling that night, and didn't bother with it for a few days after that. The last time I watched it though, I made it all the way though, with a dose of absinthe. I think it was Duplais. :twitchsmile:

I'm curious about Sleeper, and if I find it has difficult to get into, I think I'll take a long brake from Allen.

I did like the ending of Deconstructing Harry rather well. I had never thought about a room full of all of the characters I've written about applauding me, which does weird things to an ego...

A little technological fix to a spiritual problem.


#8 Jetzster

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 07:11 PM

"The Descent" was greatly intensified with Duplais and Marteau, as was "I Am Legend" and its older brother classic "The Last Man on Earth" with the great Vincent Price,one night recently ... :shock:
"First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.."-Mahatma Gandhi 1869-1948)
. ......".Barkeeper!...Marteau!!...and fresh horses for my men!...."

#9 baubel

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 07:22 PM

Morgan!


Come out...Morgan!

A little technological fix to a spiritual problem.


#10 AiO

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 04:48 AM

Sigh.


I see you and I are on the same page when it comes to Woody Allen. I just remembered another of his films--came out around the same time as Deconstructing Harry--that I enjoyed, though: Sweet and Lowdown. Very slight story, but good performances by Sean Penn and Samantha Morton, and great 1930s music. Lots of Django Reinhardt-inspired stuff.

"The Decent" was greatly intensified with Duplais and Marteau, as was "The Legend" and its older brother classic "The Last Man on Earth" with the great Vincent Price,one night recently ... :shock:


The Descent struck me as one of the better horror movies I've seen in recent years.

And I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for The Last Man on Earth and those other crazy B horror movies that AIP put out in the '50s and '60s: Wasp Woman, Pit and the Pendulum, X... I hear Roger Corman is getting an honorary Oscar next year--about time.
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#11 buddhasynth

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 10:19 AM

I liked Woody a lot more in my youth, I thought Sleeper was particularly funny, but Zelig was pretty much it for me. Maybe the "serious" ones would have more impact in retrospect but by the late 80's I found his stuff to be just a bit redundant and pretentious. The better the photography got, the more formulaic and transparently predictable the content became.I mean how many times are we expected to empathize with these Invariably Jewish Neurosis-laden New-York-centric academic types who need to be led by the hand like a toddler thru their interpersonal relationships? And EVERYONE has an analyst. Is that all the guy can come up with? And his recent trend toward lighthearted comedies reeks of contractual obligation and  just makes it painfully obvious that despite staying busy for decades he hasn't produced an actual work of Art in a quarter century. :thumbdown:
What part of Klaatu Barada Nikto don't you understand?


...because shoddy absinthes will be flavored with the lubricator of take the lead anise.

#12 AiO

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 12:23 PM

The better the photography got, the more formulaic and transparently predictable the content became.


Hammer, meet nail.
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#13 Jetzster

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 03:40 PM

Another absinthe minded flick is "They Live" a little known jewel from John Carpenter about a homeless drifter who has been wandering since he was a kid, but when he stumbles into one ordinary town he discovers something beyond extraordinary... Aliens landed on earth there some time ago and have been using mind control to prevent us from seeing them.

To the rest of the world the aliens appear to be humans, but with the help of some special glasses he finds, the drifter and his co-worker can see them in their true form, and wage a two man war on the alien empire to reclaim earth...very well done

One more is "From Beyond" a journey with with a pair of scientists who are trying to stimulate the pineal gland with a device called The Resonator. An unforeseen result of their experiments is the ability to perceive creatures from another dimension, who proceed to drag the top scientist into their world. He later returns as a grotesque shape-changing monster and preys upon the others at the laboratory

Another green sipper is "Forbidden Planet" with Leslie Nielsen,hands down the best Sci-Fi flick of the 50's....... :thumbup:
"First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.."-Mahatma Gandhi 1869-1948)
. ......".Barkeeper!...Marteau!!...and fresh horses for my men!...."

#14 baubel

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 04:09 PM

I've been wanting to see They Live again for a while. :twitchsmile:


Sweet and Lowdown.




I always forget about that one, but I've liked it the most out of all the others, now that you've reminded me of it.

I love the scene where he takes his date to "Shoot rats".

A little technological fix to a spiritual problem.


#15 AiO

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 05:21 PM

Another absinthe minded flick is "They Live"...


Great movie. I love the totally gratuitous wrestling scene (it seems like it goes on for ten minutes!) between Rowdy Roddy Piper and Keith David in the alley. By the way, is there a more underrated actor than Keith David? He's badass even when he's just doing the voiceover for Ken Burns's stuff.

Gotta say, though: the best John Carpenter film for me, hands down, is The Thing (followed closely be Escape from New York).

One more is "From Beyond"...


Another classic. Better than Re-Animator.

Another green sipper is "Forbidden Planet" with Leslie Nielsen,hands down the best Sci-Fi flick of the 50's....... :thumbup:


Hard to argue with that, but I think the original Invasion of the Body Snatchers gives it a run for its money. Also the The Incredible Shrinking Man, Them, and The Quatermass Xperiment. Very different kinds of movies, but equally excellent.
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#16 buddhasynth

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 06:29 PM

From Beyond made me think of Naked Lunch. Or is it the other way round?
What part of Klaatu Barada Nikto don't you understand?


...because shoddy absinthes will be flavored with the lubricator of take the lead anise.

#17 Muckaxe

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 09:09 PM

Watched "Shaun of the Dead" last night with my GF, and had a splash or two--probably more of a beer movie, but absinthe is tasty almost any time. Last weekend we were watching "La Vie en Rose" and had a couple as well--seemed appropriate. One of these nights I'll get around to watching "Synecdoche New York" (I bought the damn thing), probably with a glass of something.

#18 baubel

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 11:57 PM

AiO-
The gratuitous fight scene in the alley has always been a mystery to me, I don't know if it detracts or adds to the film, but usually I find it amusing none-the-less. As well as the scene when the signal gets disrupted and the poor woman realizes what she's doing to...and I'll leave it at that.


Carpenter really did a good job with The Thing, when I read Chamber's "Who Goes There?", I was really surprised and really impressed at how well he adapted it.

I think I louched up a glass when I saw Quatermass and The Pit, but I don't remember it was over a year ago now.
Lynch's Dune is fun to watch with some Montemarte in hand. :twitchsmile:
Eraserhead...not so much.

I think I had a little absinthe the last time I watched Peck's version of On The Beach. It's hard not feeling like enjoying a dose with that movie playing.

A little technological fix to a spiritual problem.


#19 Bob Tessier

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 03:12 AM

Thinking that Casablanca would be a good one, and Rocky Horror Picture Show on Halloween.
"Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!"

#20 Clement Arnoux (Aggelos)

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 03:23 AM

Ah, the RHPS... I went to an interactive session a few days ago.

Absinthe and movies ?
Well, duno why, but anything involving vampires and New Orleans makes me want to sip a glass (True Blood being overall well indicated as a weekly excuse)

Moulin rouge, lastly, obviously (even though they burn it in the movie)

Anything romantic or old fashioned is a good movie :)

On a side note, I cannot watch The Big Lebowsky without my "white russian kit", but it has little to do with absinthe :)
Absinthe makes me a different man. Why shouldn't he also have his two glasses ?
Unless Absomphe-related, if it's about old things, you can ask me

#21 Absomphe

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 05:10 AM

One of these nights I'll get around to watching "Synecdoche New York"


I just watched that one last weekend.

Terrific cast, but the temporal ( and locale) shifts were a bit over the top, even for my taste, and I usually enjoy those.

Yes, I'm Krinkles the Clown on an absinthe a beer bender.

You got a problem with that?


#22 buddhasynth

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 11:40 AM

  Eraserhead...not so much.  





oh, come on, now. Lighten up! :laugh:


 
What part of Klaatu Barada Nikto don't you understand?


...because shoddy absinthes will be flavored with the lubricator of take the lead anise.

#23 Jetzster

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 12:15 PM

Carpenter really did a good job with The Thing, when I read Chamber's "Who Goes There?", I was really surprised and really impressed at how well he adapted it.


Agreed,baubel!

Another night a while back, while in a military mood, the disturbing "Jacobs Ladder","Straight Metal Jacket" and the ahead of its time "Johnny get your Gun" were green contenders...
"First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.."-Mahatma Gandhi 1869-1948)
. ......".Barkeeper!...Marteau!!...and fresh horses for my men!...."

#24 AiO

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 12:29 PM

The gratuitous fight scene in the alley has always been a mystery to me, I don't know if it detracts or adds to the film, but usually I find it amusing none-the-less.


I always pictured Carpenter saying, "Well hell, we got Rowdy Roddy Piper in the lead... we need some wrestling in this thing!" Fun scene.

Lynch's Dune is fun to watch with some Montemarte in hand. :twitchsmile:


Good call.


One of these nights I'll get around to watching "Synecdoche New York"


I just watched that one last weekend.

Terrific cast, but the temporal ( and locale) shifts were a bit over the top, even for my taste, and I usually enjoy those.


I actually quite liked it, though you're right--those sudden leaps forward in time (plus the way the movie veers between fantasy and reality, comedy and tragedy) can be very disconcerting.

Its definitely one of those movies that requires (and repays) a second viewing, too. The problem is, you're so worn out and depressed by the end of it, you're not sure if you can take it again! At least not right away.
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#25 Absomphe

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 01:32 PM

A second viewing is the plan, but I'll definitely wait until this lingering depression dissipates before I tackle it a second time :3869-sadbanana:

Yes, I'm Krinkles the Clown on an absinthe a beer bender.

You got a problem with that?


#26 Neorebel

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 07:23 PM

Carpenter really did a good job with The Thing, when I read Chamber's "Who Goes There?", I was really surprised and really impressed at how well he adapted it.


Agreed,baubel!

Another night a while back, while in a military mood, the disturbing "Jacobs Ladder","Straight Metal Jacket" and the ahead of its time "Johnny get your Gun" were green contenders...



What about Apoc. Now?

#27 AiO

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 03:56 PM

OK, I'll take the bait.

It has brilliant moments, but I've always found it meandering, overlong, and not a little pretentious at times. And the "Redux" version? Fuhgeddaboudit. I actually like his wife's documentary about the making of the film, Hearts of Darkness, better.

For my money, Coppola's best movie is the criminally-underrated The Conversation, a loose remake of Blow-Up with Gene Hackman. Yes, it's better than The Godfather (Parts I, II, and III) IMO. I'd like to see his latest movie, Tetro, though. Anybody caught that yet? It's got Vincent Gallo--an interesting director in his own right (Buffalo 66, The Brown Bunny)--in the lead. Looks intriguing.

Now you got me thinking about Buffalo 66. "Spanning time, we're spanning time..." :laugh:
"Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot" -- Charlie Chaplin

#28 Jetzster

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 07:47 PM

Havent caught either Buffalo66 or Tetro but both do look interesting and need to see for sure..
How about the painful "The Machinist " with a severely emancipated Christion Bale and the "Hangman" game? :dead:
and the new Jason Statham stuff would also be great with the Fairy in attendance.. I believe hes gonna be working on a new version of "The Mechanic" soon... oh those Charles Bronson movies! ...:thumbup:
"First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.."-Mahatma Gandhi 1869-1948)
. ......".Barkeeper!...Marteau!!...and fresh horses for my men!...."

#29 seeker of truth

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 11:20 PM

Lock Stock & Two Smoking Barrels, and Snatch are my favorites of Jason Statham's work.
That's not to say I haven't enjoyed his more recent films, I just like the early stuff.

An American Werewolf In London with a drink in honor of the full moon edition being released
I talk like a drunk man walks, in every which way but where he is headed.

#30 Neorebel

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 07:08 PM

For my money, Coppola's best movie is the criminally-underrated The Conversation, a loose remake of Blow-Up with Gene Hackman. Yes, it's better than The Godfather (Parts I, II, and III) IMO.
Now you got me thinking about Buffalo 66. "Spanning time, we're spanning time..." :laugh:


The conversation huh...I'll have to check that out! Espec if you enjoyed it more than The Godfather & Bram Stoker's Dracula...


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