Jump to content
Alan Moss

Is Absinthe in Danger of Becoming The New Mezcal?

Recommended Posts

And for the French to take up the Teutonic beverage beer, would have been tantamount to treason.

 

tell that to the native Gauls...they created wooden barrels for their beer that eventually replaced clay amphoras for wine...that's why good(debateable) wine smells of oak and not pine resin...beer has existed in France longer than wine! and the Alsacians? yikes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That might work for a larger establishment wishing to at least pit on the aire of being exclusive. Those places with a more casual atmosphere, a place with high traffic or a catered event might see an advantage in disposables. Move more drinks, more efficiently with less cost and less hassle afterwards while still providing what the customer wants. And plastic spoons are real easy to print logos on.

As for glasses, they don't have to be pontarlier or bubble glasses with dose lines. There are other styles out there which I'm sure would be at least adequate. Any good barkeep should know what an ounce of booze looks like.

 

I'm just trying to look at it from the proprietor's perspective. This way, more mainstream or trendy establishments (Old Absinthe House?) might be more inclined to serve absinthe in a way that at least approximates how it was served way back when.....without the fire.

 

Now, will this cheapen the experience for some of us in some ways? Yes, of course it will. We are the ones who have gone out, done the research and paid the exhorbitant shipping fees just for the privilege of tasting a finely crafted beverage. Nintey-nine percent of the drinking public would never think of going through the effort we have for a mere drink. It's easier just to order a beer.

 

Oh yea. If the spoons were plastic, the last thing you'd want to do is set the sugar on fire.:tongue:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does making things "easier" and "more economical" cheapen the experience? Or is it simply a necessity of our time? I, for one, probably would have no problem with such "disposable" absanthia, so long as it facilitates the cause of fine absinthe and correct absinthe preparation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And for the French to take up the Teutonic beverage beer, would have been tantamount to treason.

 

tell that to the native Gauls...they created wooden barrels for their beer that eventually replaced clay amphoras for wine...that's why good(debateable) wine smells of oak and not pine resin...beer has existed in France longer than wine! and the Alsacians? yikes!

 

 

You mean there are still native Gauls in France? OK, I mean other than Asterix and Obelix?

 

In my searches I've discovered that yes the French did make beer and drink it. The NW coast was a particular area where wine growing never caught on. As friend Absomphe says, there isn't much of an export market, so most people are not familiar with French brewing.

 

Also in my searches there's much to suggest that by the 1860's the rise of improvements in distilling technology and practices led to the availability of many spirits at higher quality than previously. And absinthe may have benefitted from this, and with it's special preparation may have gained greater popularity. Also, folks may just have liked it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Teach'em young ... start'em early! I want absinthe spoon Transformers in McDonald's Happy Meals. Or how about Barbie's Belle Epoch Bistro?

:arrr:

 

 

Obsellus Prime, Ultra Marteau, Bumbleblanche, or Montemartron?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So simple yet so incredibly e-vil.

 

< evil supervillain voice>

My plan is elegant in its simplicity. :devil:

< /voice>

< cue maniacal laughter>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Obsellus Prime, Ultra Marteau, Bumbleblanche, or Montemartron?

 

Fighting the good fight against the Czecksinthicons!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oddly enough, in this context "Decepticon" seems to be more fitting than before.

 

 

 

More than meets the palate.

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe all we need is a little luck and a lot of wormwood.

 

 

:twitchsmile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another marketing idea would be smaller bottles or more organized tastings of different brands (such as what Drink Up New York is doing April 30th).

Most consumers are hesitant to pony up $50 plus dollars per bottle for any spirit, especially one they don't know - and lets face it - with most spirits at least you can mix it and make cocktails to use it up (scotch,tequila,etc.,). Most people wouldn't think of that for absinthe.

Unless someone can try different absinthes in small quantities for a reasonable cost they will not want to .It's pretty financially punishing to develop a absinthe education by the 750ml or 1 liter bottle.

Yes, single servings at bars are helpful, but they can be noisy and hard to evaluate a sample.Plus of course again we suffer from most bars thinking 1-3 absinthes are all they need and they will of course be the usual suspects.

What would really be helpful would be 50,100 or even 200ml bottles (for roughly 1,2 and 4 samples/people respectively) available for people to try.

Given bar pricing , they would be cheaper and more attractive to consumers. Also it would allow them to buy samples with a low entry fee as it were.

This model has long been in use especially in whiskies, but curiously absent ( for the most part) in absinthe.

 

We also do not see many organized tastings (outside the Society) in liquor stores or restaurants/bars especially for more than one brand at a time. (As a sidebar we also need smaller/better glasses for just small samples - with 1/4 oz sample laws a puddle at the bottom of a glass doesn't work visually or from a bouquet standpoint ) .

Unless the brands can be sampled and appreciated for their uniqueness to each other we run the risk of losing any wider acceptance of Absinthe and the category dwindling (as I have stated before of course)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time I tried the New Amsterdam gin was in small sample bottles. I bought a couple at sample price and went back for the bigger bottle. I reckon this would be a PITA for most but the larger producers. I don't know. The mini bottles would be a nice starting point. They make good traveling companioons also. *smile*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le Tourment Vert did the small bottles, and I think that was both a blessing and a curse: a blessing, because it gave folks a chance to spend just $6 or &7 on a sample to see if they liked it. A curse, because it was LTV. Who would go back to buy a full bottle after they tried the sampler?

 

But seriously, the "airplane" bottles of 50mL are indeed what we need. When folks get around to understanding that 20 to 25mL is enough to make a full dose glass of absinthe, that 50mL bottle (even if it's $7 to $9) starts looking like a bargain.

 

On a side note, I think the bubble glass which La Maison d'Absinthe sells is perfect for sampling absinthes, because the reservoir holds 20mL, which when properly louched makes a 3 to 3-1/2oz drink. I can have 3 or 4 different absinthes in an evening and not get too hammered using this glass, and it also makes the bottle last longer. A 700mL bottle produces 35 servings at that rate!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The first time I tried the New Amsterdam gin was in small sample bottles. I bought a couple at sample price and went back for the bigger bottle. I reckon this would be a PITA for most but the larger producers. I don't know. The mini bottles would be a nice starting point. They make good traveling companioons also. *smile*

Yes , they hate minis - cost and PITA factors for bottling -but as you said in your note - it gets people to try things. New Amsterdam is a good example - even though it is cheap - about $20 or so (but good for the money these days) I think most of us risked the $1-3 for a 50ml rather than pay more and get stuck with a 750 of paint remover.

A $5-10 mini would get a lot more people to try a new (to them) brand. It would also allow retailers to take a risk on more new brands without the financial risks of full size bottles.

And yes they are great and convenient for traveling :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About the New Amsterdam gin. I saw the 750ml bottles first while cruising the gin section and there was a small sign beneath the New Amsterdam that indicated that mini's are on the counter if you want to test drive them first. So the liquor store made an effort to sell the stuff by offering the small bottles as bait.

 

As for New Amsterdam as a gin, I like it and for the price it's ideal for experimenting. JMO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...the bubble glass which La Maison d'Absinthe sells is perfect for sampling absinthes, because the reservoir holds 20mL, which when properly louched makes a 3 to 3-1/2oz drink.

Thanks for the recommendation, Ken! :cheers: And the reminder--I have to get a couple glasses!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good luck trying to find a bar/establishment that serves absinthe in Sault ste marie Canada!

everyone I talk to either has no knowledge or is quick to dismiss it as something to not even bother with.

 

upon asking a bartender if absinthe is served, I'm usually given a puzzled look and a reply similar to:

"isn't that illegal?"

:huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×