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Neorebel

Promotional Replica Glass

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This may sound ridiculous, but here's the deal: I have some replica glassware from when I was an Absinthe noob. One of the items is a nice molded replica reservoir glass, with the 'La Fee' logo on it. La fee is disgusting. I attempted to remove their logo from the glass with denatured alcohol and a 'magic eraser' sponge without success. Any ideas??

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Well Ken, a piece of black electrical tape will solve your dilemma (or a blindfold for the kitty), but Neorebel's dilemma is a bit harder. Neo, is the logo etched into the glass? If so you ain't never gonna get that sucker off. If on the other hand it is some sort of sticker (for lack of a better term), there might be hope. But do not resort to sand paper, trust me. Been there, ruined that... :thumbdown:

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On glass and chrome I use steel wool. I use it on my pickup's windshield. The stuff is cheap and has lots of other uses. Granted it ain't WD40 but it's good to have around.

 

Good luck!

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If what is on the glass is paint or decal, I would try a solvent. acetone based nail polish remover comes to mind, or my favorite paint ruiner, brake cleaner. Do use that outside, and clean thouroughly before drinking out of the glasses. It's nasty stuff.

 

Jim

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Try some Zip Strip on the paint. It should take it right off and leave zero residue.

 

It is a nasty chemical though so be careful.

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The best way to get paint off of glass is with a razor blade and extreme care. A single-edge blade will scrape and chip away the paint without damaging the glass if you take your time, but don't let your attention wander. Trust me, I'm a doctor of paint removal from glass.

 

However, and this is important...why bother? That Pontarlier II glass that La Fée paints their logo onto can be had for less than $10 on Amazon. Consider the one with the logo a kitsch collector's item and keep your old wheat pennies in it in the attic or something. You'll spend time and effort cleaning the paint off of a cheap glass, and one day you might even wish you hadn't.

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I totally agree with Wild Bill. Repro glasses are fun and inexpensive to get, so save the elbow grease. Plus, you could always use the La Fee glass for when you offer your friends side-by-side comparisons of good vs. bad absinthe. I believe there is a Jade glass in the same style if you wanted a matching set!

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Razor + Goo gone.

 

If you can just get it started with the razor,

soak the chipped away area in goo gone and then push/pry at the near by edges (they should be easier to remove at this point).

 

Repeat- Reapt- Repeat.

 

When you have finished removing the paint, apply more goo gone and then polish away any remaining residue.

 

And say good by to an hour of your life.

 

EDIT: oh and the area under the logo may never look perfect and the adhesive may have etched the glass.

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Related but in an opposite direction:

What if I wanted a very cool logo etched into a glass? Something cool and tasteful like, maybe Ridge Verte? Directions?

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Glass etching paste. Have your design on an adhesive material, apply to the glass, trim out your design with an xacto knife or some similar tool and apply etching paste. Rinse then remove extra adhesive material and admire.

 

Someone here did that with a fleur de lis design on a fountain.

 

Hobby stores will have it and reading the instructions is probably a good idea.

 

Oh, I have an ultra high speed engraver, About 300,000 RPM's, with diamond burrs for engraving glass.

I just don't have steady enough hands anymore.

 

We have a member that does bottle engraving don't we?

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Thanks, guys. If I did it, it'd look like a 4-year old's work with a box of Crayolas.

 

 

And I just insulted many, many four-year old kids.

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Strippers and LTV. Who says the Wormwood Society are all snobs?

 

 

Hey! I was a stripper for about 15 years. ;)

 

but um...not the kind with lights on them. Instead I had lights under me. heh

 

(printing = 4/c stripper...magazines, ads, brochures, etc)

 

and, definitely NOT a snob!

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I wonder if the stripper will work on an LTV bottle?

 

 

From what I've heard that usually depends on how much one is willing to spend. :twitchsmile:

 

 

I wouldn't know though.

 

 

 

Seriously.

 

 

 

Never been.

 

 

Seriously.

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Joe,

I used the glass etch stuff from Hobby Lobby and it worked out pretty good )I made Christmas gift glasses with the dose and water line etched on).

You can use normal adhesive shelf paper or vinyl electrical tape. The tape worked a bit better as I could stretch it around odd shapes, but a larger area like for a logo might be better served with shelf paper.

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What ever happened with this? I have the same glass and it would be nice to remove that visual abhorrence.

Did anyone ever find anything that would work? I would like to know if I may. :wave2:

I made Christmas gift glasses with the dose and water line etched on.
This is a really great idea. I would love to try this.

How you know where to mark the water line though? Do you just mark it at 3 to 1? :unsure:

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My dishwasher did a great job at removing a poor faux (logo) etching on one of my glasses. You can only just barely see it now when the light is right.

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Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is pretty much the gold standard for dissolving stuff like that.

 

However, it's also fairly nasty stuff- suspected carcinogen and teratogen. The EPA did recently downgrade its toxicity from a "2" to a "1" for labeling, but I'd still want to make sure I was wearing gloves (two pairs; it dissolves them) and work in a very well ventilated area.

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My dishwasher did a great job at removing a poor faux (logo) etching on one of my glasses. You can only just barely see it now when the light is right.

It does and use pot-scrubber dish-washing soap...run on sanitizing mode.

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