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greenfaerie67

Recreating the effect?

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Hi this might be long but I wondered if anyone could enlighten me.

 

I have been drinking Absinthe very occasionally for the past 5 or so years, I enjoy the 'ritual' but have never noticed any different feeling other that usual drunk effects.

 

However... on a recent trip to Poland, my partner and I visited a bar called Absinthe, we had already had a couple of pints of beer and we had 3 absinthes. They were done by the barman the Bohemiam way which seems to be traditional in Poland. Instead of getting drunker our minds seemed to become clearer and remained so for the rest of the night.

 

It might have been just 'luck' and the mood we were both in, but it might have been an effect of the Absinthe? Can anyone tell me if they have had anything similar and if there is a brand of Absinthe that will more likely recreate this effect?

 

We had two brands that night, one was Mr Jekyell and the other was a Czech one but Im not sure of the name.

 

The outcome of the evening is that I have 'discovered' the Doors... I had always liked individual songs but had never really paid attention to them all. :wave2:

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They were done by the barman the Bohemiam way which seems to be traditional in Poland.

 

I assume you're referring to soaking a sugar cube in absinth, lighting it on fire, and dumping it into the drink, in which case, there's nothing traditional about it.

 

Unless you consider a fifteen year old Czech marketing gimmick to be tradition.

 

As far as that method opening "doors" for you, as no other absinthe experience had, I can't imagine that it was anything more than a psychosomatric reaction brought on by the ritualization of the procedure. I'm sure it didn't make your drinks taste any better, but considering your selections, I doubt it could have made them taste any worse.

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Hi there.

 

What absinthe were you drinking over the past 5 years?

 

Poke around the site. There's plenty of information on the absinthe 'effect'. Some people feel it more than others. Regardless, the most you'll feel is a bit more awake, like you said. The effect has absolutely nothing to do with the 'Bohemian' preparation, unless you think that burning sugar creates a stimulative effect. If that were the case, then Creme Brulee would be served at all the raves. :mbanana:

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Start by examining why you expect that absinthe is supposed to have an "effect." Seriously, think about it for a while: where did you get all of your ideas about absinthe. Surely it wasn't any of the scientific and historical documents studying absinthe and its chemistry.

 

Examine the history of absinthe prior to the 1990s and see if you can find any sources that imply that the casual drinking of absinthe led to any sort of effect beyond inebriation. The entire notion of absinthe as a drug is a modern creation based on misinterpretation of early medical reports, exploited by marketers.

 

If casual imbibing of absinthe produced such an effect, given that literally millions of ordinary people drank it every day for at least half a century, there would almost certainly be much more than a few vague and florid references by poets. There would likely be much plain and simple open discussion on the matter—it would be common knowledge.

 

The so-called bohemian ritual isn't traditional anywhere. It's a modern bar stunt and serves no purpose other than getting attention... and more orders for absinthe.

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there's nothing traditional about it.

And nothing Polish as well. I believe I know that bar (was it in Cracow?) and everyone gets disappointed with it, so no wonder.

 

Creme Brulee-yummy yum!

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I *knew* there was a reason why I love Creme Brulee so much! And if you add a little orange zest to the sugar, it becomes downright transcendental.

 

Seriously, the Doors! Congratulations on your "discovery", I remember doing the same lo these many years ago. I had my brother play "Take it as it comes" as he drove me to my first wedding. And "Roadhouse Blues" was the official anthem of many an adventurous road-trip. I still feel that Jim Morrison has/had one of the finest voices to grace Rock'n Roll. :worshippy:

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And it's so comforting that he still does, in the personage of ex Tea Party lead singer, Jeff Martin.

 

The physical and vocal resemblance is so striking, it's uncanny.

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Gotta love the Lizard King! This past summer Ray Manzarek & Robbie Krieger played a free outdoor show as "Riders On The Storm" just outside Buffalo, with Brett Scallions of Fuel on vocals. (No Densmore). Obviously not quite what it would have been like in the old days, but it was pretty cool seeing a couple legends up on stage. :bguitar:

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And it's so comforting that he still does, in the personage of ex Tea Party lead singer, Jeff Martin.

 

The physical and vocal resemblance is so striking, it's uncanny.

Mindreader! :thumbup:

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Wonderful, I'll have to check him out.

What's uncanny is that's the name of a good friend of mine, however he is Jeff Martin, the Electrician.

:cheers:

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I can understand the Morrison liking. For me, however, it's Layne Staley and Sebastian Bach.

 

"The Rooster" and "I Remember You" I can get lost in all day.

 

Really, I'm not gay.

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UGH! I wish Nirvana and Kurt Cobain never happened.

 

I guess Layne never tried to gain sympathy from his fans. :g:

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I still find "Nutshell" to be hopelessly somber. Layne was special.

 

EDIT: Wow, this thread was derailed in a New York minute!

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I was a big Nirvana fan for a while 15 years ago. I really can't say I've had the inclination to do anything but press the fast forward button when any randomly comes up on my iPod anymore.

 

As for Alice in Chains, I still consider Jar of Flies to be their best offering. "Nutshell" and "Rotten Apple" are classic. Not a fan of "Don't Follow" too much, but all the rest are great. I always loved "Them Bones" and "Would" as well. The rest I could take or leave.

 

Wow, this thread was derailed in a New York minute!

 

Yes it has. Probably for good reason, though. Votes to move it to the music thread?

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Just decided to spin "Jar of Flies".

 

EDIT: (Curious about the new AiC album coming out this summer but, like many, I wish that Jerry et al. would have decided to change the band's name).

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However... on a recent trip to Poland, my partner and I visited a bar called Absinthe, we had already had a couple of pints of beer and we had 3 absinthes. They were done by the barman the Bohemiam way which seems to be traditional in Poland. Instead of getting drunker our minds seemed to become clearer and remained so for the rest of the night.

 

When I first saw this post, my instinctive (and uncharitable) reaction was that it had to be someone shilling for KoS or some other producer of not-absinthe, but viewing the profile, there seems to be a real person there, so on that assumption...

 

...first, welcome to the Wormwood Society. I hope you'll enjoy yourself here. Second, do treat yourself to one of the many excellent brands of absinthe available in the UK (ratings of both brands and vendors are accessible via the main WS page). If you went to Poland and had a glass of scorched, Czech-produced not-absinthe swill, and failed to have a sort of horrific epiphany, I can only wonder at what you've been drinking on and off over the past five years. The good news is, there's lots of really wonderful stuff to be had, and it's generally cheaper than the Czech offerings.

 

I am a major skeptic about all purported "secondary" effects of absinthe. I find that like any spirit, it can make one drunk if one drinks too much. Otherwise, it has a mild stimulative effect, not unlike that of Irish Coffee. However, others here do report various effects, including a degree of mental clarity unique to absinthe consumption. It seems to be a matter of individual experience.

 

At any rate, good absinthe tastes wonderful!

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Whew! Back on track. thank you Marlow.

 

As far as effects, I can't/won't claim effects but different herb bills in different absinthes have different effects on how much I may drink. Wait, let me back up. I may have vivid dreams, moments of clarity, a smile on my face when sipping quality absinthe. and the lack of hangovers, which at my age are very uncomfortable and last far too long.

 

As for drug like effects...............nah!

 

Quality booze makes me smile anyway. Cheers!

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Just decided to spin "Jar of Flies".

 

Aw man, one of my favorites, soooo good!

 

But in regards to absinthe, taste trumps secondaries in my book, so that's what I go for first and foremost.

 

That being said, I love a nice alert buzz as much as anyone. Say, how about some more of that Essai #4....

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Well, while we're on it, François Guy tastes pretty awful, but in terms of that "secondary" feel, that's one way to go, as far as I can remember. I wouldn't recommend it, though. It's a very simple concoction of anise and wormwood, no complexity from fennel or much of anything else, that I recall and just way too sweet and the alcohol content is below what I'd consider proper for a good absinthe. That's just me, though.

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I definitely feel that absinthe gives me a different buzz than other alcohol, in which I want to be creative or immersed in something. I also don't realize that I am drunk right away - it isn't a sloppy drunkenness I get from Absinthe (unless I have too much too fast of course).

 

Ultimately, I subscribe to the notion that someone mentioned here once, that every spirit has its own 'personality,' or produces a unique state of drunkenness. Absinthe happens to be a spirit that has a lot of mystique surrounding it, a lot of culture... The ritual itself promotes a good dynamic amongst friends. Why not give in to a 'psychosomatic reaction?'

 

I know these sound like 'weasel words,' But consider this - I recall the best conversation I ever had with my grandfather. We don't get to talk much and we have difficulty seeing eye to eye. We were drinking 'his favorite wine' at the time. I was having a great time, and in turn, the wine tasted great to me. I later found out that the wine was Carlo Rossi 'Paisano' jug wine. I purchased some and drank it on my own, and it was godawful.

 

Not to say in the least that Absinthe is dependent on the ritual or bad tasting on your own, its just that things can be 'enhanced' by the situation

Edited by Neorebel

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I'd say that mead is a different buzz than beer.

Tequila is (disgusting) a different buzz than bourbon.

 

EDIT: Wow, this thread was derailed in a New York minute!

Yay!

I am a major skeptic about all purported "secondary" effects of absinthe.

At any rate, good absinthe tastes wonderful!

Yep and yep.

 

As for drug like effects...............nah!

Booze ain't no drug?

I'm teasing, of course. It's one of our few socially acceptable recreational drugs. We better take care of it.

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Examine the history of absinthe prior to the 1990s and see if you can find any sources that imply that the casual drinking of absinthe led to any sort of effect beyond inebriation. The entire notion of absinthe as a drug is a modern creation based on misinterpretation of early medical reports, exploited by marketers.

 

 

To play, in her place, devils advocate a bit...

 

I think there are gobs of literary 'evidence' that would lead any normal person/reader to believing there is more to absinthe then just getting drunk. Zola, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Hemingway, Wilde, London, Borges... I can give a quote or reference in a book to any one of them that... at the very least... implied they/their character was feeling a bit more open/intimate/lucid/frightened/depressed/overjoyed/a-thousand-other-terms than had they just poured a glass of whiskey or wine.

 

I only say this because to dismiss a neophite on this point isn't quite right.

 

Now, the REST of her post? Ay carumba.

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I think there are gobs of literary 'evidence' that would lead any normal person/reader to believing there is more to absinthe then just getting drunk.

You can play the artistic freedom card with any alcohol though:

 

"Drunkenness is nothing but voluntary insanity." - Seneca

 

"Alcohol is like love. The first kiss is magic, the second is intimate, the third is routine. After that you take the girl's clothes off.” - Raymond Chandler

 

"Now tequila may be the favoured beverage of outlaws but that doesn't mean it gives them preferential treatment. In fact, tequila probably has betrayed as many outlaws as has the central nervous system and dissatisfied wives. Tequila, scorpion honey, harsh dew of the doglands, essence of Aztec, crema de cacti; tequila, oily and thermal like the sun in solution; tequila, liquid geometry of passion; Tequila, the buzzard god who copulates in midair with the ascending souls of dying virgins; tequila, firebug in the house of good taste; O tequila, savage water of sorcery, what confusion and mischief your sly, rebellious drops do generate!” - Tom Robbins

 

“A horrid alcoholic explosion scatters all my good intentions like bits of limbs and clothes over the doorsteps and into the saloon bars of the tawdriest pubs” - Dylan Thomas

 

“Quickly, bring me a beaker of wine, so that I may wet my mind and say something clever.” - Aristophanes

 

“The wine urges me on, the bewitching wine, which sets even a wise man to singing and to laughing gently, and rouses him up to dance and brings forth words which were better unspoken” - Homer

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And sorry I didn't 'quote', I couldn't get it to work :blush:

 

Just hit the "Reply" button under the post that you'd like to quote (as opposed to the "Reply" at the end of the thread). :pirate:

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