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tayker

Whiskey

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I prefer Rye 9 times out of 10. It is harder to find in many Pennsylvania bars I go to though, so I consume most of it from my own cabinet. I find that many bars and resteraunts stock many different types of Bourbon, but if you ask for Rye, you are likely to get Canadian Club or Crown Royal.

 

I think it is a must have for many whiskey cocktails, especially the older ones.

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Agreed.

 

I'm a rye man myself, though I do love good bourbon. I've been on a Woodford Reserve kick recently--though, tellingly perhaps, I find it to be a very rye-like bourbon, with a spicy, sour flavor that sets it apart from the sweeter bourbons I've had. It works wonderfully well in all of my favorite bourbon cocktails: the Old-Fashioned, the Mother-in-Law, the Seelbach, the Mint Julep...

 

I've got a bottle of Redemption Rye (95% rye!) on order from DUNY that I'm dying to try. Then, of course, there's Leopold's Maryland Rye on the horizon. Boy, I can't wait to sample that stuff!

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Then, of course, there's Leopold's Maryland Rye on the horizon. Boy, I can't wait to sample that stuff!

Gotta say, it's mighty tasty. The American Style whiskey will knock your socks off too.

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Nice to see some fellow rye lovers here. I have been using Sazerac rye in my Manhattans lately, and really enjoy it. I like the Sazerac rye straight up, too. Another bourbon that I feel makes for an excellent Manhattan is Bulleit -- it has a very high rye content, even though it is classified as a bourbon. It is a very "hot" whiskey, which I think is a plus in a Manhattan. I think that a "sweeter" whiskey, such as Maker's Mark, doesn't contrast with the vermouth enough.

 

I'm also looking forward to making some sazerac cocktails, once I get ahold of some absinthe.

 

Interestingly enough, this year marks the 200th anniversary of the oldest extant rye brand, Old Overholt, which is now owned by the Jim Beam conglomerate. Beam has neglected the brand (no publicity/advertising, allowing bottom-shelf positioning) and isn't doing a thing with the occasion. It's a missed opportunity, if you ask me, given the resurgence of rye in popularity. The reintroduction of a higher-end, 100-proof Overholt would be a big hit.

Edited by Boris

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I can't get the Rittenhouse BIB 100 here over the counter here in Michigan, but I should be able to order it online. I have heard great things about it. I agree that today's Overholt is watered down and a shadow of its former self.

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The bonded Rittenhouse is great stuff, as is Sazerac (their 18 year is hands-down my favorite rye... so far), but there will always be a spot on the shelf for Overholt in my bar. It's a great rye for the money and I use it fairly regularly. It makes a delicious Manhattan with Dolin sweet vermouth and Regan's orange bitters in place of Angostura.

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The SAQ finally has a true American rye on their shelves. It's called High West Rendezvous. https://www.saq.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servl...p;top_category=

 

It's priced at $85.50 a bottle. I've been anxiously awaiting the day that I can try a proper rye but $85 is a lot for me to spend on a bottle. I haven't heard much about this brand. Has anyone tried it?

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It's made in Indiana, and a 'distillery" in Utah puts their label on it.

 

Essentially, it's Rye Whiskey that's distilled at an old Seagram's plant that's designed to be used as a blender with other whiskies.

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Knowledge is a wonderful thing.

Since we received our DSP, I have been floored by the number of companies offering us discount rye, bourbon, vodka, gin, etc... by the tanker load and at prices to make your head spin. "Just slap your label on the bottle!" There is no shortage of cheap booze nor snake oil salesmen willing to peddle it. I shop more carefully now.

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There are very, very few distilleries in the US that are actually mashing, fermenting, and distilling whiskey. Only the tiniest fraction of consumers know this.....which is, of course, no accident.

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Thanks for the info. I guess I won't be wasting my money on that one.

 

It's kinda ironic that their website states: "While our own whiskies age we are fortunate to offer some beautiful and very unique whiskies we found that no one else was willing to sell".

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It's made in Indiana, and a 'distillery" in Utah puts their label on it.

 

Essentially, it's Rye Whiskey that's distilled at an old Seagram's plant that's designed to be used as a blender with other whiskies.

 

 

Wow, how is that even legal? It seems that marketing alcohol as being distilled in one state when it is actually distilled in another is a clear case of "false advertising", and given that it's alcohol I would think the standards would be even stricter than for some other consumable.

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If you read carefully, you'll see that they now tell you on their website that they don't distill the stuff themselves, although they still aren't very clear about that.

 

I don't want to dissuade you from purchasing a bottle, Babble. It is by most accounts a fine whiskey. It's just that the folks in Indiana made the stuff is all. I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

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If you read carefully, you'll see that they now tell you on their website that they don't distill the stuff themselves, although they still aren't very clear about that.

 

I don't want to dissuade you from purchasing a bottle, Babble. It is by most accounts a fine whiskey. It's just that the folks in Indiana made the stuff is all. I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

 

I also saw on their website that one of the rye's used in... not sure if it was this brand or another one of theirs, is used to blend Canadian whisky! Do Cdn whisky producers buy some of their whiskies from the States???

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Oh shit! You followed the rabbit down the hole and now the Matrix is unravelling before your very eyes!

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You have to remember that most spirits companies are now part of the largest conglomerates in the world. Spirits are a commodity, and have been shipped around the world in bulk for centuries. It's not like beer. The only way to make a bottle of booze taste exactly the same from year to year, particularly when it comes to whiskey, is to blend the living shit out of it. Some blends will contain as many as 50 different whiskies from dozens of distilleries. If you blend like crazy, and you can't get one of the blending whiskies for a given bottling run, no one will ever notice.

 

 

Grey Goose, as an example doesn't have a distillery. Neither does St. Germain, Van Winkle Whiskies, Johnnie Walker, or Patron tequila. They are all marketing companies, and couldn't ferment their way out of a paper bag if their life depended on it.

 

Wanna talk about wine? Don't think that you'll like that conversation, either, although it's not as bad as the spirits world.

Edited by leopold

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The only way to make a bottle of...whiskey is to blend the living shit out of it.

 

That's a part of the process (and an ingredient) that I never knew about....

 

The More You Know!!!

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Wanna talk about wine? Don't think that you'll like that conversation, either, although it's not as bad as the spirits world.

 

Alice Feiring would say the wine world is in very bad shape. Absolutely no character to much of what's on the shelves.

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Patron a marketing co.? very disappointing news. Great marketing though, I thought it was produced at a distillery like Herra-Durra. Well as good as it may taste not worth the cost. Got any other shelf clearing news Leopold ?

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I left half a bottle of Highland Park 18 yr single malt at a party. $100 a bottle. I didn't want to get pulled over (I NEVER drive over the limit) but I was wearing a kilt and had my ink showing. An open container would have been trouble enough nevermind a utilikilt wearing maniac with Japanese tattoos! Damn. Missing that stuff!

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