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Absinthe in 'The Secret Life of Salvador Dali?'

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Have any of you read this book by chance? I'm just getting into it and there was a part in the book in which Dali says 'There was a French family that was very intimate with my parents and whose members were confirmed gourmets; hence a woodcock, served "high" with brandy burned over it, had no secrets for me, and I knew by heart the whole ritual for drinking a good Pernod out in the sun with a sugar-lump dipped into it, while listening to the thousand and one comic anecdotes about our nouveauxriches.' I was just wondering if he was referring to Absinthe. There is also an image later in the book that has a carafe and some sort of goblet/absinthe glass with a crawdad hanging from the side of the glass. I haven't read that far yet and the picture is in black and white so I'm not sure if that is absinthe as well. Anyway, he's a interesting character thus far and it's a beautiful book published in 1942 in case any of you were interested. :cheers:

 

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Another good book I recall is 'Collected Fictions,' from Jorge Luis Borges. He has some great stories and refers to absinthe a few times.

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Dali was my first favorite artist when I was in school. I wanted to be a surrealist when I grew up (intead I just turned out to be surreal).

 

Dali (b. 1904) was a child during the decade before the French ban. He would have been in his early teens when Pernod opened its post-ban distillery in Tarragona in 1918. I think there's a pretty good chance he was talking about absinthe.

 

Good find. :cheers:

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Yeah, he definitely has some nice work. My sister took me to Santa Fe to see some art galleries there, where I was able to see some of his student's (Jean Claude Gaugy) work. Also very impressive stuff. I would like to find prints of Dali's Alice in Wonderland pictures but haven't been able to find any places that sell them unfortunately.

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Not a problem ubu. I like his stories because you don't have to read them all a once. A short story here and there with novels in between keeps a long book from getting drab. I also found Borges' fascination with labyrinths interesting. I think I'm going to pick up some C.S. Lewis collections next. I started reading the 'Screwtape Letters' in Barnes and Noble and it was pretty interesting.

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I never could get into Dali.

 

 

 

Wait... that's not quite correct.

 

I can't stand Dali. (duck)

 

 

 

I just don't get it. Ever. Went to his museum in Paris and everything. Still... nothing.

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As they say different strokes. I would be lying if I said I liked all of his stuff. He's had so many different forms of artwork released and there's plenty of which I'm not a fan. I like his more famous stuff like his elephant pictures or his soft watches. The ones I really want to get are copies of his Alice paintings. So far he sounds like he was a real sociopath from reading this book. Oh, and I found another mention of Pernod in the book. 'We drank in the shadow of the plane trees. I took a Pernod and had a little fit of laughter.'

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Opinions of Dali's work seems to be either "love it" or "hate it" with not much in between. I enjoy it (not sure what that says about MY mind, since the guy seemed kind of twisted). For fans, there is a great museum dedicated to his work in St. Petersburg, Florida that is well worth the visit if you're nearby.

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I saw an exhibit of his in the Philly art museum a few years ago after having been a fan of his for a long time. In fact, his is pretty much the only art I like--at least liked, since ironically absinthe has opened me up to other sorts of art. And even then, I'm really just into the sort of art that was coming from the absinthe artists, if you'll pardon the horrible blanket moniker.

 

Anyway, the exhibit was fantastic, even offering a whole bunch of his sketches. I just am fascinated by his art and is pretty much the only art I can sit and look at for a long period of time and still, after years, discover new things!

 

I have Cygnes refletant des elephants on one wall, and In voluptate mors on the other. That's the reflective elephant one, and the photo of all the naked ladies forming a skull! Oh, my favorite mug is a wraparound image of the cats flying through the air in front of water!!!

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Dali is best known for his Surrealist works, but he went through various style stages throughout his career; it actually is fairly diverse. On a possible wormwood-related note, check out "Sun Table" (1936) if you can. Are those absinthe glasses, with spoons? :euro:

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Man, hard to say. I'd think if he were trying to portray absinthe glasses he'd have done so with the spoons resting on the rim. Although being vague and mysterious is a slight characteristic of his, so who knows!

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So that's what messed him up and made him the Dali we all know and love! I'm going to have to keep my eyes peeled for that book. I have been studying his work for years and his life was anything but boring.

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Dali has always been a favorite. Have to admit my awareness of art ended years ago. My 2nd wife and I used to go to the Philadelphia Museum of Art frequently years ago when you could get in free on Sunday mornings. Don't know if this policy exists anymore. Then when I was occupied with a talented young artist a fraction of my age I got back into painting again. After she and I parted ways my interest waned. Lord knows where all that stuff is buried now.

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