Jump to content
Joe Legate

Vilya Spirits (formerly known as Ridge Distillery)

Recommended Posts

Maybe I'm wrong,but I was under the impression that Joe & Jules use their own cultivated wormwood.
I didn't want to derail a different thread but I want to respond to redwun's comment.

 

All of our Grande Wormwood is from native Montana plants that we wildcrafted and collected the seeds. We are cultivating those plants in a completely pesticide-insecticide-herbicide-fertilizer free area/garden/patch/field. We still continue to wildcraft our A.a. in areas only fertilized by bear/elk/moose/deer poop that is inaccessible by motorized vehicles.

 

Why do we still wildcraft?

A. It's fun.

B. It allows us to gauge our "domestic" A.a. with Ceres' version to make certain they remain the same.

C. Trips into the back country allow us to keep an eye on how the wild Angelica is faring.

D. Finding fresh bear poop is more exciting than a scary movie.

E. Wildcrafting allows Ridge to provide A.a. to other distillers without taxing either of our sources.

 

So, do we cultivate? Yeah, kinda. Do we wildcraft? Most definitely! Which A.a. do we use in Ridge absinthe? So far, only the wildcrafted Grand Wormwood but we will always opt for the most fragrant, flavorful option.

 

Our Artemisia pontica? 100% cultivated in the chemical-free zone! :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why do we still wildcraft?

 

You forgot one.

 

Because America needs its affordable indigenous answer to Sauvage. :) :thumbup:

Edited by Absomphe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And that's no bear :poop: !

 

Why do we still wildcraft?

 

You forgot one.

 

Because America needs its affordable indigenous, and sensible answer to Sauvage. :) :thumbup:

 

Fixed. x2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Excellent food and outstanding absinthe and gin at America Eats Tavern. Pictures when we return to Montana. :cheers:

DAMN I missed that one and I was right there at the art museum. Next time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Y'all ever experiment with anise hyssop?

 

The description in wikipedia sounds nice:

 

 

 

Anise hyssop was used medicinally by Native Americans for cough, fevers, wounds, diarrhea. The soft, anise-scented leaves are used as a seasoning, as a tea, and in potpourri. The purple flower spike is favored by bees who make a light fragrant honey from the nectar. [2]

Edited by Miguel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jules is allergic to hyssop so obviously, that is not part of our herb bill. Anise hyssop is different and to my knowledge, isn't a traditional absinthe herb. It grows in our garden and is a very fragrant plant. I don't know if Jules has an allergy to anise hyssop or not.

 

As soon as I get caught up on a few projects, more experiments are in order. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't realize there was a difference. I just know when I got some seeds it said "anise hyssop" and I went "oh, that must be why it goes so good in absinthe."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having the last glass from a bottle of Ridge V. been setting around a minute. Poured a fine deep dark green, like swamp water (and I mean that with the highest respect). Louched up like a Smoky Mountain morning and tasty as all get out. Sad to see the bottle empty, but what a way to go. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Excellent food and outstanding absinthe and gin at America Eats Tavern. Pictures when we return to Montana. :cheers:

 

Here we are!

 

AET1.jpg

 

 

That's so weird! I was there a week after they first opened, and I specifically remember ordering the white Ridge! That's really weird. Was pretty awesome watching them put a fountain in front of me and NOT lit shit on fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jules is allergic to hyssop so obviously, that is not part of our herb bill. Anise hyssop is different and to my knowledge, isn't a traditional absinthe herb. It grows in our garden and is a very fragrant plant. I don't know if Jules has an allergy to anise hyssop or not.

 

As soon as I get caught up on a few projects, more experiments are in order. ;)

 

It wouldn't be a 'traditional' absinthe herb, because it is native, but the description of its flavor/aroma seems to be in line with absinthe herbs. Maybe a Jules friendly alternative to hyssop. As I heard in a Western once, the world is what you make of it. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hyssop in the coloring versus distilled process, could very well be two different animals.

 

Where Jules will always remain an Angel. :heart:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Bill! :heart: Tis true that hyssop has not been my friend. I wanted it to be. That being said not every absinthe needs hyssop. That is part of the beauty of absinthe. Each bears the mark of the creator's personality. I think we'll keep our absinthe recipes just the way they are for now. Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill, I ain't talking about traditional hyssop, but about Anise Hyssop, which is a native USA plant. It looks to be genealogically different enough to, hopefully, not to be a health issue to the still mistress. It was just a thought for experimenting. :)

Edited by Miguel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tis true that hyssop has not been my friend. I wanted it to be.

I know of at least one absinthe with hyssop in the coloring that didn't give you fits!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It *could* be an interesting addition. In my opinion though, you have a winning product. If it ain't broke, pretty please don't fix it. It's really delicious!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have other projects in mind but Silvertip, Ridge Verte and Blanche won't change. We made what we like with both of them. Yep, new projects before too long, I hope. ;)

 

Local press with pleasant footage of Jules and a fellow distiller and of course, Montana scenery. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:cheers:

 

"We became friends with other microdistillers and they found out we naturally had the alpine herbs that grow," said Julie, "they encouraged us and said 'Why aren't you doing this yourself? You can do this."

 

And they were right, as usual. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They also predicted that I would be able to leave my soul sucking day job within a year and that happened too. They've got some mad skilz. Yes they do. Cheers to you, fine Sir!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That brought a tear of pride to my eye. Very nice and oh so true. :heart:

Seriously.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OK, where's my free sample. :laf:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you very much. :cheers:

You should be tasting the all organic herb bill, I believe.

If you don't mind me asking, where did you get the bottle?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×