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Leif Rogers

First US Oil Mix

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Before I go to sleep I have the annoying habit of thinking up terrible realities for this world. Last night's was when the US would finally throw an oil mix into the US absinthe fray.

 

To my knowledge there isn't one (if I'm wrong please correct me) and God bless the valiant men and women for not having succumb yet. However, will one be on its way? It almost has to be sooner or later.

 

Thoughts?

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Inevitable? Perhaps. Likely? I don’t think just yet. That’s a long road to sow, but I’ve been wrong before…

I agree with the good Dr. above ;)

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We are so fortunate that the first US absinthes are all distilled. If the stuff starts flying off the shelves, I would expect to see oil mixes in the future.

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Already been done. And their your favorites studiofox, the creme de la creme, ones I know you'll really love.

 

Djabel (Devil) = Red Stromu

Green Fairy = Green Stromu

Koruna = KOS with a real wormwood stalk in the bottle!!!

 

It seems like they haven't fulfilled our greatest desire in bringing the famous and very rare Yellow Stromu to our shores. Perhaps in the future, eh?

 

:dev-cheers:

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Those are Czech products. I'm talking about when we'll be jumping on the oil mix bandwagon so...if we've done it list those.

 

Regardless, anyone notice how the czech word for devil picked up a j in translation? The czech bottle just has Dabel whereas the US release reads Djabel. Maybe it's "new and improved"

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It seems like they haven't fulfilled our greatest desire in bringing the famous and very rare Yellow Stromu to our shores. Perhaps in the future, eh?

That one requires long time aging in the harsh Mexican sun. It is not Añejo Jaune Especial Reserva™ just for fun.

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Call me an idealist, but I think it's possible to make a good oil mix, or compound absinthe. There's no reason to think that someone who sincerely wants to create a good value brand absinthe couldn't do so. It's just that at this time almost everyone who really cares about quality is distilling. Compound absinthes are currently made as a shortcut, just like other artificially flavored schnapps.

 

There are thousands of flavorings available to a commercial flavor chemist. Remember that literally all of the finest perfumes on the market are created from essential oils. That same skill can be—and is—put into crafting flavors.

 

It's only the really inexpensive, pre-made, off-the-shelf flavorings that taste obviously chemical or artificial (i.e. Banana, No.253). Many are basic chemical components, precisely isolating one note or chord—for instance gamma-Decalactone—in the symphony that is the full flavor of a ripe, warm, juicy, Georgia peach.

 

The main obstacle here is finding a good-quality absinthium flavoring that's actually sourced from absinthium. Who knows? Maybe the right flavors don't exist, and creating them would be more costly than simple distilling.

 

Hey! Whats wrong with bum wine?? Without it, what would bums do???? :)

Get a job?

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Compound absinthes are currently made as a shortcut, just like other artificially flavored schnapps.

 

I guess that's what I was thinking about when I posed the question.

 

Heaven knows there were enough recipes back in the day to suggest that it wasn't as sinister sounding as it is nowadays (just jobbing absinthe men being jobbing absinthe men I suppose), however, since all we have are the present examples to go with--I get the fear pretty easy. But then again, having never sampled a vintage compound, does anyone know what any of those old suckers could have tasted like?

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I think it all just depends on who's making what and how it is made when it comes to an oil mix. I have been experimenting for a few years now, and finally have gotten a good mix down. It takes time, practice and money. Organic herbs of true quality are quite a pain to find, then getting the amount right is such a pain in the a**. One teaspoon is all I use of organic wormwood, then 4-5 tbsp of Mugwort as a much better tasting yet still similar-effect herb, then various amounts of Melissa, Fennel, Green Anise seeds, liberal yet smaller amounts of Calamus, Coriander, etc. It just matters on what you want in a flavor profile.

I have to admit when I first tried a home-brew of absinthe I thought I was going to die it was so bitter, but finally after years of painful research into using all of the above mentioned herbals and learning their interesting yet long histories and flavour profiles, making a cheap homebrewed alternative to spending 60 bucks on one fifth tastes all the more better. Does it taste like distilled quality V.P.?? Hell no!! Not at all, but that wasn't what I was wanting to do either, I just wanted an alternative so I created what is now known as "Captain Beyond": Homemade absinthe-like booze which tastes like anisette on steroids. Home brews are great in that you know you only spent a maximum of 30 dollars on a fifth of good tasting vodka and only a week's time it's done, filtered and ready to consume. It tastes similar to absinthe, and isnt bitter and get's you plastered and completely wasted by the second drink. And that was with a strong water dilution of 1:5, so it will last. As far as the "secondary effects" they are there more-so than in distilled absinthe, and that could be because of the Calamus and Mugwort, but let's just say I've had a gentle and happy feeling all day since I awoke this morning.

And...at the end of the day though I still long and want for distilled absinthe, just because it simply tastes wonderful and no matter what you just cannot retain and get that flavour without distilling.

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I still hold a special place in my heart for Wild Irish Rose...

 

For which relief, I'm sure your liver is grateful. ;)

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Is Serpis 65 an oil mix or a distilled absinthe? I've seen it referenced as an oil mix, but it tasted pretty good to me along side modern distilled COs (not on par with the highest quality vertes, but fruity and wormwoody, definitely better than Grande Absente).

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From what I've read, Serpis 65 is distilled. Thank you, by the way, for indirectly reminding me that I need some of that in my life. It's been a while. I have to say that (despite wanting to dislike it originally) Serpis is one of my favorites. It's the only one that I tried years ago that I can still drink and enjoy.

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I think it all just depends on who's making what and how it is made when it comes to an oil mix. I have been experimenting for a few years now, and finally have gotten a good mix down. ...

 

And...at the end of the day though I still long and want for distilled absinthe, just because it simply tastes wonderful and no matter what you just cannot retain and get that flavour without distilling.

It's true. You can't get absinthe without distilling [edit: if you're working with whole herbs]. A liter of absinthe contains around an ounce, by weight, of absinthium.

 

What we mean by oil-mix or compound absinthe is one made solely with neutral spirits and essential oils, no actual herbs. What you have there is a "macerate." It may be a tasty or interesting drink, but it's not absinthe any more than batter is cake, wine is cognac, or beer is whiskey. You have to cook it.

 

You're barking up the wrong tree in the quest of "effect". Aside from its own particular type of intoxication—no more different than between wine and gin—I've never seen anything written prior to the Summer of Love that suggests that absinthe has an "effect" just from drinking a glass or two. The idea is a post-psychedelic-era, drug-subculture creation that has been hijacked and monetized by unethical marketers.

 

Before then, absinthe was thought to be a cumulative and debilitating poison. We now know, through science and much personal research :twitchsmile: that this wasn't the case.

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Compound absinthes are currently made as a shortcut, just like other artificially flavored schnapps.

 

I guess that's what I was thinking about when I posed the question.

 

Heaven knows there were enough recipes back in the day to suggest that it wasn't as sinister sounding as it is nowadays

 

Today, the modern flavor and fragrance chemist has at their disposal thousands of individual chemical compounds that they can order from anethole to who knows what. They can simply dial in the components they want to whatever precision they need.

 

The 19th and early 20th centuries didn't have that. In Duplais the essences that are discussed appear to be concentrated distillates from actual herbs, fruits, roots, etc. Those were then added to their neutral spirit to make the beverage, followed by artificial coloring.

 

does anyone know what any of those old suckers could have tasted like?

 

afaik, none of these have come down to us. (In 2006, I also asked this question.)

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Is Serpis 65 an oil mix or a distilled absinthe? I've seen it referenced as an oil mix, but it tasted pretty good to me along side modern distilled COs (not on par with the highest quality vertes, but fruity and wormwoody, definitely better than Grande Absente).

 

 

Serpis was my first shipment of absinthe along with the ns70 and François Guy. I think someone very aptly described it as a good "house" absinthe. I really enjoyed it and it makes a great long summer drink. It lacks the complexity of the Swiss and French varieties but stands on its own for being an enjoyable drink at a decent cost. I'd reorder as well.

 

regards~ leich

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