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Beef Bourguignon


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#1 Jonathan D.

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 09:56 AM

Made this recipe over the weekend, found it from Ina Garten on the Food Network website...

The sauce is really delicious, thanks to Remy VSOP and a nice bottle of Cab. And don't you dare forget the bacon! I wound up serving it with rice instead of the mentioned bread slices as I was concerned about the bread getting soggy. In any case, it's a perfect wintery dish for the crappy weather pelting most parts of the country.


Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon good olive oil
  • 8 ounces dry cured center cut applewood smoked bacon, diced
  • 2 1/2 pounds chuck beef cut into 1-inch cubes
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound carrots, sliced diagonally into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 yellow onions, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons chopped garlic (2 cloves)
  • 1/2 cup Cognac
  • 1 (750 ml.) bottle good dry red wine such as Cote du Rhone or Pinot Noir
  • 1 can (2 cups) beef broth
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves (1/2 teaspoon dried)
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature, divided
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 pound frozen whole onions
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms stems discarded, caps thickly sliced
For serving:
  • Country bread or Sour Dough, toasted or grilled and rubbed with garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley, optional
Directions
Preheat the oven to 250 degrees F.

Heat the olive oil in a large Dutch oven. Add the bacon and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the bacon is lightly browned. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon to a large plate.

Dry the beef cubes with paper towels and then sprinkle them with salt and pepper. In batches in single layers, sear the beef in the hot oil for 3 to 5 minutes, turning to brown on all sides. Remove the seared cubes to the plate with the bacon and continue searing until all the beef is browned. Set aside.

Toss the carrots, and onions, 1 tablespoon of salt and 2 teaspoons of pepper in the fat in the pan and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are lightly browned. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the Cognac, stand back, and ignite with a match to burn off the alcohol. Put the meat and bacon back into the pot with the juices. Add the bottle of wine plus enough beef broth to almost cover the meat. Add the tomato paste and thyme. Bring to a simmer, cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid and place it in the oven for about 1 1/4 hours or until the meat and vegetables are very tender when pierced with a fork.

Combine 2 tablespoons of butter and the flour with a fork and stir into the stew. Add the frozen onions. Saute the mushrooms in 2 tablespoons of butter for 10 minutes until lightly browned and then add to the stew. Bring the stew to a boil on top of the stove, then lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Season to taste.

To serve, toast the bread in the toaster or oven. Rub each slice on 1 side with a cut clove of garlic. For each serving, spoon the stew over a slice of bread and sprinkle with parsley.

#2 Trid

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 06:44 PM

Would I be a complete philistine to suggest the possibility of doing this in a crock pot on high?

It's one of those things I have to entertain while currently sans-oven.
Some people are like slinkies....not really useful for anything, but you can't help but to smile when you see them tumbling down a flight of stairs.

#3 Jonathan D.

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 09:16 AM

Do you have a cooktop/burner with which you can do some of the searing?

If so, I'd suggest you do some of the initial stuff on the burner per the recipe above, but then transfer to a crock pot for the longer cook period.

If you do not have a burner, I'd say you're probably better off finding a recipe specifically designed for a crock pot. I would not advise attempting to burn off the alcohol from the cognac in a crock pot, I don't think they are designed for that sort of thing, and a 1/2 cup of cognac makes quite a fireball.

#4 Trid

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 12:53 PM

I do have a single burner camp stove, so off a-searin' I go. Given that the dutch-ovening will be replaced with a crock pot, I'm wondering if there's a practical purpose in burning off the alcohol from the cognac (which I would take as a measure to keep from a gas/wood oven from exploding).

Then again, I probably ought to try doing it the firsttime as close to the recipe as I can, THEN monkey with it on subsequent efforts.
Some people are like slinkies....not really useful for anything, but you can't help but to smile when you see them tumbling down a flight of stairs.

#5 dakini_painter

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 01:15 PM

I thought the alcohol served two purposes: deglazing the pan and adding flavors and a bit of liquid.

At 80 proof, the alcohol should not burn.

Or so I think.

"Good is the only investment that never fails." Thoreau.
"Don't you push me baby cause I'm holdin' low / and you know I'm only in it for the gold" Grateful Dead
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#6 Jonathan D.

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 01:55 PM

I figured the same, dp - or at most I expected it to be something subtle. However, when I lit the cognac in the pot the flames were approximately 3 feet high at their most vigorous point, I was quite surprised!!

Definitely use caution, it's a bigger flame than you'll expect.

#7 dakini_painter

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 04:55 PM

OK! I stand corrected! Glad you didn't get burned.

I suspect it's because it's hitting that really hot pan. So another reason they add the cognac is to demonstrate the skill of the chef (in not burning his whiskers?).

:worshippy:

"Good is the only investment that never fails." Thoreau.
"Don't you push me baby cause I'm holdin' low / and you know I'm only in it for the gold" Grateful Dead
Distiller and Proprietor, Delaware Phoenix Distillery, Walton, NY. DSP-NY-15019. www.delawarephoenix.com


#8 Trid

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 06:06 PM

Yep...consider that once the booze heats up, it starts vaporizing. UBER flammable. I've had wine do this in the past, although not with quite the pyrotechnics as brandy. If you're cooking with gas, you don't even need to light the booze, just a simple tilt of the pan and slide it back from the flame and the vapors do the rest. Woe be to the person who isn't expecting this. :blowup:
Some people are like slinkies....not really useful for anything, but you can't help but to smile when you see them tumbling down a flight of stairs.

#9 MMarking

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 09:16 AM

I think it is best served with perfectly cooked new white potatoes. At least that is how I have had it in France...again and again and again! :dribble:
Okay, so it is a favorite.
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#10 Martin Lake

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 02:57 PM

Doing this today with venison. Mmmmm...
Ah, la petite mort; such beautiful suicide.

#11 fingerpickinblue

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 06:45 PM

Bambi Bourguignon?
blind man see her, dumb man call her name - Ed Bell

#12 LeRoy

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 07:05 PM

Sounds good to me!
I have a few venison roasts in the freezer that would work just fine. Let us know how it works, Martin.

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#13 Absomphe

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 07:51 PM

Bambi Bourguignon?


Tasty, and alliterative.

I'd be game for some of that.

Yes, I'm Krinkles the Clown on an absinthe a beer bender.

You got a problem with that?


#14 Jonathan D.

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 09:13 PM

How deer you, sir!

#15 Martin Lake

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 09:19 PM

Turned out pretty damn tasty. I made some variations, such as I didn't include potatoes because I was serving it over pasta. Also, I threw in a shank bone, just because I had it and couldn't think of what else I'd do with it. All in all, I can't complain about the dinner I had tonight. The stew was lovely and as an added bonus, the shank had enough marrow in it for a couple of luscious spoonfuls. Very rich, venison marrow is.
Ah, la petite mort; such beautiful suicide.

#16 fingerpickinblue

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 09:19 PM

How deer you, sir!


Prey this comes to an end!





I wasted my 200th post on this? :dribble:
blind man see her, dumb man call her name - Ed Bell

#17 Martin Lake

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 10:22 PM

Not a waste, actually. Not a waste.
Ah, la petite mort; such beautiful suicide.


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