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Martin Lake

All You Sausage Makers

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Hey, so I just came into five pounds of venison and, since free meat rarely comes my way, I thought I'd take the opportunity and try my hand at making sausage. The problem is that I don't have a food processor with a sausage attachment, and I'm wondering whether it's possible to fill the sausages using some other technique. Say, with a pastry bag? Do I need a sausage filling machine, or can I do it by hand?

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You can stuff the casings the good old fashioned way with a steer or goat antler / horn if you'd like to be at it for a while...

 

Call around to see if you have a meat processing market in your area and ask what they'd charge to make veison sausage or find yourself a Cajun lasy who knows how to make venison boudin.....

Sounds like a Boucherie is in order......

Edited by CajunDaddys_girl

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...I'm wondering whether it's possible to fill the sausages using some other technique. Say, with a pastry bag? Do I need a sausage filling machine, or can I do it by hand?

 

Absolutely, prior to our fancy electronic gadges, sausage was typically hand-filled through the use of a special sausage "Funnel". Looked much like a normal funnel, but with a wide opening on it which the casing could be brought onto and then doled out as you pressed the meat through with your thumb. I believe these are still available?

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The sausage making will commence on Wednesday. I'll let you know how it goes. And, while I appreciate the suggestion, there is a distinct lack of antlers in the city, so I think I'll go with the old pastry bag method. And if I don't succeed, I've at least had a lot of fun telling people I'm going to be grinding my meat and stuffing my sausage.

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Well, my Sausage Fest 2009 is done. All tolled I made 6.6 pounds of sausage using 5 lbs venison, 1 lb beef, 1/2 lb bacon, a few handfuls of cranberries, and a bunch of fresh sage. I tried it using a pastry bag, and that was moderately effective, but the bag was cheaply made and tore apart, so my friend and I worked the meat through a funnel as per Alan's suggestion. She pushed the ground venison and I worked the meat forward in the casing using my hands to simulate peristalsis. That's right, in the end, the best way to cram things back into intestines is to simulate intestinal movement. I have a whole new insight into my body after this.

 

Oh, and the sausages came out looking awesome.

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Thanks, but if that one's the penultimate sausage-making book, which one is the ultimate?

 

Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing by Rytek Kutas (1984 Macmillan Publishing Company, NY ISBN 0-02-566860-9)

 

Also good is ChaRcuteRie by Michael Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn (2005 ISBN0-393-05829-8) .

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Good to see you Le Gimp. I was thinking about you today while shopping at a home brew store. I listened to a bunch of rhetoric and thought "Le Gimp could set these folks straight". *smile*

 

Cheers!

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I just finished up with about 12 pounds of various sausages.

  • Pork (pork shoulder, pork belly, fresh sage, red chile, sliced garlic, onion, shallot, fennel, rosemary, salt n pepper)
  • Chicken (chicken legs, sage, red chile, sliced garlic, onion, shallot, dried cranberries, minced apple, salt n pepper)
  • Lamb (lamb shoulder, chicken, pork (to extend the lamb a little), sage, rosemary, red chile, apple, fennel, scallion, onion, dried cranberries, dried shiitake mushrooms, apple, red wine, salt n pepper)
  • Mixed Grill (lamb, pork, duck, and all the goodies in the lamb sausage).

 

It all sort of started with "hey, let's go over to so-and-so's house and cook" which led to "I have a sausage stuffer attachment for my Kitchen-Aid" which led to a trip to the market for whatever ingredients wanted to leap forth into my basket. I guess it wound up being "kitchen sink sausage."

 

Those "one thing led to another, and another, and..." that end in sausage are always winners.

 

Oh, and I'm totally on board with a dry-cure sausage. I was smitten with a wild boar cacciatorini I found in Las Vegas this past fall.

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