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Clue me in to what I'm tasting

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Hi Gentlefolk,

 

Tonight, I cracked my 3rd bottle of absinthe. The first 2 were Spanish absinthes NS70 (72%) and Serpis(65%). A strong licorice flavor in both. Tonight I pulled the cork on the François Guy (45%) and it is so extremely different that I don't know what I'm tasting. There seems to be no licorice taste to it at all and I'm having a hard time figuring out what it is exactly. The site I bought it from termed it a reference class anissette so I thought the licorice flavor would be even more predominant. Instead there seems to be an almost nutty quality to it. Frankly its so different from the Spanish absinthes that I need the help of the tastebuds of the experienced absintheurs to clue me in to what I'm tasting.

 

Just as a note the louche and aroma started almost with the very first drop of water and was interesting to watch ending in a opalescent white with a slight blue-grey tinge on the surface when viewed from the top.

 

This new taste will take some getting used to. Is this what I can expect from French absinthes?

 

Thanks

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The licorice flavor in the NS70 comes from an oil mix (or did the last time I had a glass). FG has a lighter flavor to you (I suspect) since the anise and other herbs are macerated prior to distillation. It generally makes for a smoother, less over-powering flavor. Actually, it's kind of funny since François Guy was frequently knocked for being too heavy on the anise.

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Yes that's how I feel exactly. I had expected a licorice taste that would be stronger than the Spanish products. Instead I have this rather light herbal , nutty(?) concoction that seems to have no licorice bite at all. I really enjoyed those Spanish absinthes and will buy again. However, If I'm looking for a strong licorice taste with more herbal or floral complexity in a Swiss or French absinthe, what should I try?

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Not to hijack this thread (well, maybe a little bit). But there's an herb I've been tasting in a few absinthes that I love, but I don't know the name of.

 

I'm spicy, but not peppery. I'm found in Jade Eduoard, Roquette 1797, and La Coquette. What am I?

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Good to hear that you like the spanish absinthes. People hate on them a lot because they mostly are oil mixes and basic as regards taste. This is true; don't get me wrong, I love sipping on fine absinthe, but speaking personally, one can't be a connoisseur all the time. Oil mixes like La Fee are great for getting hammered. By the end of these kinds of nights, I'm walking around town with half a water bottle of the stuff, sipping it neat. When I want to savour the taste of an absinthe, I will indulge heavily in the louching ritual, enjoying the visual experience of the drink; oil mixes are not so pretty to watch louche... they lack the clarity that a distilled absinthe exhibits so beautifully.

 

Personally, I enjoyed the Serpis 65 - However, the louche is nothing extraordinary, and the color after water is a bit dissappointing. Overall, a very nice drink though, the red color keeps it interesting, and the fruity notes are a surprise.

 

Never tried the NS 70, though I will now that you have brought it to my attention, thank you!

 

As for your query regarding a suggestion for an absinthe that favours anise and has herbal and floral complexity, I humbly and highly recommend Clandestine La Bleue. It is one of my favourites, and seeing as you have up till now tried mostly oil mixes, you are in for quite a treat.

 

Hope you enjoy!

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People hate on them a lot because they mostly are oil mixes and basic as regards taste.
There are good and bad Spanish Absentas. I've always been fond of them. While most are characterized by a ton of anise, you can find quite a few that are well balanced while still heavy on the anise. Unfortunately, most of them aren't on the market. :pirate:

 

I'm walking around town with half a water bottle of the stuff, sipping it neat.

That's totally unnecessary, not to mention stupid. Absinthe isn't meant to be drunk neat.

 

I enjoyed the Serpis 65 - However, the louche is nothing extraordinary
Wha???? I've found the louche on the Serpis to be extremely thick, with great trails and some of the best layering out there. While it isn't the best absinthe to drink, the louche is top notch.

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People hate on them a lot because they mostly are oil mixes and basic as regards taste.
There are good and bad Spanish Absentas. I've always been fond of them. While most are characterized by a ton of anise, you can find quite a few that are well balanced while still heavy on the anise. Unfortunately, most of them aren't on the market. :pirate:

 

Agreed! :)

 

 

 

I'm walking around town with half a water bottle of the stuff, sipping it neat.

That's totally unnecessary, not to mention stupid. Absinthe isn't meant to be drunk neat.

 

As I pointed out, this is personal preference, and only near to the end of the night when my tongue and throat are so sore that I'm not going to really benefit from the subtle nuances of such a "fine" oil mix like La Fee. Again, this occaisional neat tasting that I do is only near the end of the night, and ONLY EVER with oil mixes. We can be agreed that it is tremendously stupid and wasteful to sip on neat distilled absinthe. I firmly believe that the louche is an essential and indispensible part of drinking absinthe.

 

 

 

 

 

I enjoyed the Serpis 65 - However, the louche is nothing extraordinary
Wha???? I've found the louche on the Serpis to be extremely thick, with great trails and some of the best layering out there. While it isn't the best absinthe to drink, the louche is top notch.

 

If you mean that the louche is quite oily and thick.. then yes. Top notch... well again, that is your own personal preference and I'll leave you to it. Like I said, oil mixes have their own intrinsic shallow qualites, not unlike fake tits. They're great shining peices of trash, (the tits), but you're not going to fall in love with them.

 

I leave it to you, generally speaking, do not distilled absinthes louche with more clarity and natural turbulence than oil mixes? I've never seen an oil mix louche rise up from the bottom, with turbulence, or clarity, nor that ring of clear absinthe that slowly disappears. Correct me if I am wrong.

 

Oil trails are a different matter, and I agree with you that they are pretty.

 

I mean, the kind of louche you speak of makes me think of olive oil and water mixed together. Its pretty, but messy, not at all refined, as such quality true absinthes put in mind.

 

I mean are we talking lava-lamp-pretty?

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We can be agreed that it is tremendously stupid and wasteful to sip on neat distilled absinthe. I firmly believe that the louche is an essential and indispensible part of drinking absinthe.
That's not what I meant. Alcohol of that degree can harm the tissue in the throat. But anyway...

 

do not distilled absinthes louche with more clarity and natural turbulence than oil mixes? I've never seen an oil mix louche rise up from the bottom, with turbulence, or clarity, nor that ring of clear absinthe that slowly disappears. Correct me if I am wrong.
It depends. I've gotten louches like you describe above from plenty of Absentas. A lot depends on how you louche it as well.

 

I mean are we talking lava-lamp-pretty?

Of course not.

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Agreed, Shabba. Thinking back to my experience with Serpis and other oil mixes, back when I didn't have such a refined system of slow cold dripping, pretty louches were to be had, and technique played a decisive role in how thick and slow the louuche formed, though this is also the case with distilled absinthes.

 

I must stay the course in my assertion, however, that generally speaking and as a rule, that oil mixes, inasmuch as they are "oil mixes" and by way of being such, the comparative louche of a distilled absinthe is always an aesthetic eye pleaser, much more so than oil mixes. The very term "oily trails" is a symptom of coming from an oil mix; yes they are pretty, but distilled absinthes are finer still.

 

We can agree that absentas are enjoyable products and well worth the money. Incidentally, both the websites that promote La Fee and Serpis 65 both claim that these prodcucts are distilled, even though we all know and can taste the thick oily residue. Why is this? Did they merely conveniently forget to mention that maceration is also included in the process?

 

Thank you for informing me about sipping absinthe neat, I was unaware it was harmful. I do not do this often... should it even be done at all?

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Thank you for informing me about sipping absinthe neat, I was unaware it was harmful. I do not do this often... should it even be done at all?

I will frequently taste a new absinthe neat. Just the smallest of sips, mind you. I enjoy how it transforms and the herbal profile revealed with the addition of cold water. It's part of the fun for me.

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Interesting. By the way T73, I checked out that "food porn" stuff last night. I'm stil drooling; although I think that the word "drooling" was unwisely chosen in context with the phrase "food porn". Delicious-looking stuff though!

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Tonight I pulled the cork on the François Guy (45%) and it is so extremely different that I don't know what I'm tasting. There seems to be no licorice taste to it at all and I'm having a hard time figuring out what it is exactly.

Are you familiar with the taste of wormwood? If not, that might very well be one of the flavours you find difficult to figure out here.

 

Although many people regard François Guy as an anise-heavy absinthe, to me it has always been more of a wormwood bomb.

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the tissue in the throat.

Shabba, blow your knows and deposit the result in the trash. I'm sickened to think you're in-jesting that funk. Eew.

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I will frequently taste a new absinthe neat. Just the smallest of sips, mind you. I enjoy how it transforms and the herbal profile revealed with the addition of cold water. It's part of the fun for me.

 

Just a coupla droppies to ascertain flavour is plenty! Mmm mmm.

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I had a similar experience with my first taste of Taboo Gold. It's a fine drink, but the anise is so faint compared to regular Taboo, I almost can't detect it at all. In its place are flavors and aromas that I am quite unfamiliar with :unsure: . Plus I think it needs some aging.

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Taboo or Taboo Gold. If ever there was a dessert absinthe!

I've always seen that food porn link on your posts but never visited.

You tease!

Have you been talkin' to Maggie!!!

Ya know, I forget to hit that link some days myself. I'm rarely disappointed when I do.

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If I'm looking for a strong licorice taste with more herbal or floral complexity in a Swiss or French absinthe, what should I try?

 

Jade Verte Suisse

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I will frequently taste a new absinthe neat. Just the smallest of sips, mind you.

Agreed. I do the same. But that's most definitely different from drinking it straight just to get drunk.

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I tried VdF at Butch's house and liked it very much, as do he and his wife, so you're not the only one. From all the reviews I'd seen it's considered a middle of the pack offering, but I wouldn't hesitate to put it in my top 5-6. I think it's severely under-rated.

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Tonight I pulled the cork on the François Guy (45%) and it is so extremely different that I don't know what I'm tasting. There seems to be no licorice taste to it at all and I'm having a hard time figuring out what it is exactly.

You're tasting the difference between green anise (common aniseed) and star anise—or oil derived from it—the flavoring used in licorice candy. Quality absinthe tastes mellow like anise, not sharp like "licorice".

 

The site I bought it from termed it a reference class anissette so I thought the licorice flavor would be even more predominant. Instead there seems to be an almost nutty quality to it. Frankly its so different from the Spanish absinthes that I need the help of the tastebuds of the experienced absintheurs to clue me in to what I'm tasting.

...

This new taste will take some getting used to. Is this what I can expect from French absinthes?

 

FG is extremely mild and non-complex compared to other absinthes. Not everyone likes it; I'm one who does.

 

Oil trails are a different matter, and I agree with you that they are pretty.
The very term "oily trails" is a symptom of coming from an oil mix; yes they are pretty, but distilled absinthes are finer still.

Those aren't oil trails and they don't come from oil mixes. They're the difference in refraction between two liquids with different densities.

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Oil trails are a different matter, and I agree with you that they are pretty.

 

The very term "oily trails" is a symptom of coming from an oil mix; yes they are pretty, but distilled absinthes are finer still.

 

Those aren't oil trails and they don't come from oil mixes. They're the difference in refraction between two liquids with different densities.

 

I don't understand what you mean by "Those aren't oil trails". What are oil trails then?

 

You are quite right, however, I was wrong about oil trails coming from oil mixes, and oil mixes only, because I remember now I've seen trails in other distilled absinthes.

 

What I have come to term "oily trails" are the extremely thick and viscous trails that are especial and unique to oil mixes only, resembling, you got it, oil!

 

Distilled absinthes do have trails, but they have much more clarity, and I wouldn't use the adjective "oily" to describe them, would you?

 

When you say "They're the difference in refraction between two liquids with different densities.", this science evades me. :( Sorry!

 

Can I assume that the two "liquids" are absinthe and the added water? That, also, they have different densities, and that the physical "law", (we could say), that is refraction, (due to these differing densities), is what causes these oily trails?

 

Am I wrong to assert that the trails found in oil mixes are composed of exactly that, oil?

 

Thanks everyone!

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Those aren't oil trails and they don't come from oil mixes. They're the difference in refraction between two liquids with different densities.

 

Getting tired of saying that yet?

 

"Oil trails" floated around long enough to become almost a cliche'. Perhaps we didn't know any better a couple of years ago.

I will frequently taste a new absinthe neat. Just the smallest of sips, mind you.

Agreed. I do the same. But that's most definitely different from drinking it straight just to get drunk.

Absolutely! Nor do I slam a properly prepared glass of absinthe to get drunk. Granted, occasionally it happens but very, very rarely. Knocking back bourbon will lead to that much quicker than absinthe any day although that's not my goal even then.

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Can I assume that the two "liquids" are absinthe and the added water?
Yes.
That, also, they have different densities, and that ... is what causes these oily trails?
Yes.
Am I wrong to assert that the trails found in oil mixes are composed of exactly that, oil?
Yes.
Getting tired of saying that yet?
Oh my God yes.

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I will frequently taste a new absinthe neat. Just the smallest of sips, mind you.

Agreed. I do the same. But that's most definitely different from drinking it straight just to get drunk.

 

Me too. And for the same purposes (but did you all love the descriptions of BTI recently?). But the idea of walking around with a sippie cup of absinthe, just to get "hammered"... you might as well resort to Graves grain alcohol, or Bacardi 151.

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