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Multiple distillation

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Cogitating on the manufacture and marketing of other spirits and it struck me that some (e.g. whiskey, vodka, gin) are often heralded for the number of distillations before bottling ("triple distilled" etc...). Are there examples of absinthe subjected to multiple distillation steps? Perhaps it doesn't work the same for absinthe? Perhaps something lost in repetition? If there are examples, can someone describe any advantage/benefit in the final product?

 

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St. Antoine's original batch was triple distilled. It was good, but it had lost almost all of the flavor of the base herbs. All you really tasted was what went into the coloration step.

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I've never heard of a gin that was distilled more than once.

 

Multiple distillations are used for progressively selecting cuts for whiskey, Vodka, Rum, and scotch which start out as a mash.

 

Absinthe is not mashed. It starts out as base alcohol (which may have been multi-distilled) and has herbs added, macerated, and distilled (much like Gin).

 

No reason for a distillery to distill it more than once, unless they screw up and are recovering the alcohol to start over.

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Thanks, Gimp, for reinforcing the distinction with gin. Here is a quote from a Slashfood web page regarding D. H. Krahn gin:

 

"Many gins brag about being triple or quadruple distilled. The multiple distilling is done for a variety of reasons, but usually to make the gin as clear and neutral tasting as possible, before adding the botanicals and redistilling. D. H. Krahn says that they start with clean neutral spirits and then add the botanicals. After which the gin is only distilled once to 'preserve the fragile aromas and precious essential oils of the botanicals- essences that are lost each time a spirit is distilled.'"

 

I am curious about the fragility of the "aromas and essential oils" (here speaking of absinthe). Is it mostly a case of their being labile (and degrade during multiple distillations) or is it more of a case of dissipation? I usually think of distillation as resulting in a concentration of the "aromas and essential oils", but maybe I am mistaken with macerated spirits (versus mashes, as Gimp noted). If labile, I am impressed by their durability after distillation, as so well recognized in vintage absinthe...

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