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PeterL

Pernod aux Plantes d'Absinthe Superieure

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The Pernod is overpoweringly alcohol, really not unlike rubbing alcohol.

 

Indeed. Fucking hobos are getting better quality booze from the alcohol they lick from the insides of ballpoint pens. And they're getting it cheaper. $84.50 cheaper.

 

I really detest companies like Pernod and Hills and all other czech-sinthe for charging 84.50 (and upwards, Hills ran me just under 100 bucks), for alcohol that couldn't compare to the shit I could ferment in my toilet with potatoes and raisins. It is inconceiveable for such companies to charge such prices. There are no processes involved at all!!! Hills is a macerate that doesn't even contain anise! It does not louche! Why is a bottle that has nothing in it costing 90 dollars?!?!

Pernod was a step up from Hills, one could be so generous to say, (let us say that this is because it contains anise), but the poor people buying these bottles are getting fucked and really ruining their first impression with absinthe; if ever there was a drink that didn't need this bullshit, its absinthe. If you spend 84.50 on your first bottle of absinthe, and you are excited to try this historical and mysterious beverage, and the first shit that finds its way down your throat is Hills, are you going to be a repeat customer? You'll be disappointed, is what you'll be.

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CLB, arguably one of the best blanches. It really is quite good and should be required drinking for any absinthe fan.

 

I believe it was the fourth one I tried, right after the Jades. They were all a good place to start.

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Why is a bottle that has nothing in it costing 90 dollars?!?!

 

If you're in Canada, don't they make Taboo available? Sounds like it is pretty good.

 

Taboo has only recently become available, within the last five or six months, I can't remember. My initial experience with absinthe was that which I will never forget, yet I will never look upon it nostalgically. Hills was the first absinthe I tried, then Pernod, courtesy of LCBO.

 

And yes, Taboo is pretty good, it is very good, in fact it has been growing on me the more that I drink it. The fruit alcohol base is very unique, and the anise flavour is one that makes me crave that black-licorice taste that used to make me puke when I was a kid.

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I don't know what to say. I really couldn't find much to argue in Boggy's post.

 

Is that a sign of something...?

Another sign of the Apbogalypse, I suppose.

 

Methinks the Old Man's right.

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Several times now I have gotten into a discussion with a Pernod rep, and eventually the conversation turns to Absinthe. They begin to wax nostalgic about their product and recite how (they've been told) "Pernod aux extraits de plantes d’absinthe" is made using the same recipe as it was pre-ban.

 

Discussions here form the "opinon" that nothing could be further from the truth, but I don't recall seeing more details then which would allow me to get into a he-said, she-said discussion.

 

Somewhere, on some Pernod literature somewhere, I recall reading their "official" description of how they make it, and it didn't say "using the same recipe and process", but words along the lines of "using the same ingredients", which of course is two totally different things.

 

But I'd love to have any sort of details that would be useful for explaining to a poor rep, who is simply repeating what their bosses have told them, the difference between modern Pernod Absinthe, and pre-ban.

 

-Robert

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The modern Pernod AEDPDA, is not even close to the old recipe.

The old recipe/process was whole herbs (anise, fennel, wormwood, melissa) macerated in an alcohol/water charge and distilled all together. The old Pernod was colored/final flavored by, again, macerating whole herbs (Roman wormwood, hyssop) in a portion of the distillate while being heated. Then the "colored" portion was added back to the main body of the distillate and ..viola! Real absinthe.

 

The current "absinthe" by all appearances, is a star-anise bomb with little or no relationship (outside of the name) to the absinthe of old. My guess is that it is a "flavor-oil" mixed with neutral spirits and artificially colored. I have trouble even tasting anything other than star-anise. Oh yeah, no star-anise in the pre-ban Pernod.

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But what we didn't realise is that the new Pernod has its roots in the 17th century (see this article for irrefutable proof). "Since the beginning of its rich history in the early 17th century, Pernod Absinthe ..."

 

Zman and DrinkBoy are evidently making the mistake of comparing the new Pernod Absinthe with its second re-incarnation in the 19th century ...

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"... inspired by the centuries-old original recipe ..."

 

Thanks for the article Alan. I now know why NY is such a terrible state to try and start a distillery, especially an absinthe one: Pernod-Ricard's US HQ is in Purchase, NY. All they have to do is whisper in the SLA's ear...

 

Watch out P-R. DP's coming. :fork:

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But what we didn't realise is that the new Pernod has its roots in the 17th century (see this article for irrefutable proof). "Since the beginning of its rich history in the early 17th century, Pernod Absinthe ..."

 

y'know, I'm seeing a pattern here: when an announcement/advertisement of an absinthe includes the emphasis of several flavor-obfuscating recipes, it is :poop:

 

The irony is that these guys could really raise the bar and cash in if they did it right. The stuff is definitely strong as hell and gets you drunk, but that's not the freaking point.

 

They really just have cashed in on their name.

 

[edit] ? well, I need to be sure and honest. I have been experimenting with this. Closer to 6:1 yields more palatable results. At this dilution, the "flowery something" resolves to notes of coriander with overtones of something vanilla-ish. The finish is still fairly sour. But, at this dilution, compared to Lucid (its nearest price point competitor) at it's more ideal dilution, it is less "warm": it is very up-front, on the front of the tongue. I think if you give it a "European sugar cube's" worth of sugar (30 calories of sugar) that it does better at 6:1 dilution. Damn this experimentation! One is too drunkened to record one's results!

Edited by Beautiful Loosher

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I'd disagree with that.

 

My point with P-R is that they don't care to make a good absinthe. It's not important to them. The volume they'd produce is very small compared to their usual brands.

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Having lots of money isn't the point. Because no matter how much you have, it's never enough. :dribble:

 

The love of money Maslow is the route of all evil. ;)

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Having lots of money isn't the point. Because no matter how much you have, it's never enough.
I'd disagree with that.

I understand Sola's understated commentary on greed. Agreed.

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I'm glad you guys posted this thread.

I noticed Pernod at the liquor store today, and contemplated spending the $80.00 to try it, but the clincher was the fact that the regular price for Lucid was drastically reduced at this particular store (from $75.00 to $59.00 a bottle!).

 

.........I honestly spent 10 minutes staring at the two today. Kept saying to myself "hrmmmm.......buy myself a bottle of awesomeness, or go out on a limb for this new one".

Picked up bottle of Pernod several times......read the info on the label........compared to the others on the same shelf..........looked for anything on the label that said "clandestine".......turned the bottle on its side to observe the bubble at the top and make sure the fluid was green (yup - it's green).

 

BTW - 10 minutes was the *total* time, because I actually came BACK to the same shelf twice (after wandering around to see if anything else struck my fancy).

 

I was overwhelmed by indecision, so I ended up buying something else - but next time I visit the store. I'm picking up the Lucid.

 

 

P.S. ---- someone on the first page posted Pernod as having the highest ABV in the states. Actually, "Grande Absente's" abv is 69% to Pernod's 68% (just an FYI).

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.........I honestly spent 10 minutes staring at the two today.

 

BTW - 10 minutes was the *total* time, because I actually came BACK to the same shelf twice (after wandering around to see if anything else struck my fancy).

 

Hmmm

I thought I was the only one that did that!

 

I'd say 10 minutes was pretty quick!!

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To all you that want to try Pernod 68:

 

Here is a review I wrote when I tried it two years ago when I dicovered they were selling it at the LCBO. Since that initial experience, I have tried La Fee Parisian, Combier Blanchette, Taboo and Kübler. IMO, Pernod was the worst of the lot. Keep in mind that this was my first taste of absinthe.

 

http://liquor-pig.blogspot.com/2008/12/per...8-absinthe.html

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Several times now I have gotten into a discussion with a Pernod rep, and eventually the conversation turns to Absinthe. They begin to wax nostalgic about their product and recite how (they've been told) "Pernod aux extraits de plantes d'absinthe" is made using the same recipe as it was pre-ban.

 

Discussions here form the "opinon" that nothing could be further from the truth, but I don't recall seeing more details then which would allow me to get into a he-said, she-said discussion.

 

Somewhere, on some Pernod literature somewhere, I recall reading their "official" description of how they make it, and it didn't say "using the same recipe and process", but words along the lines of "using the same ingredients", which of course is two totally different things.

 

But I'd love to have any sort of details that would be useful for explaining to a poor rep, who is simply repeating what their bosses have told them, the difference between modern Pernod Absinthe, and pre-ban.

 

-Robert

 

Might I ask where your place of business is so I may swing by sometime... Do you offer any absinthe?

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I have trouble even tasting anything other than star-anise.

 

Oh yeah. I made the fatal mistake of pulling the trigger at DUNY and getting a bottle. I should know better and should of checked WS. I knew I was in trouble as soon as I opened it, and this over-bearing anise smell (more like an anise gas) filled the room. I would compare it to La Fee, only more so (which is NOT a good thing). Stupid,, stupid, stupid! :no:

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Here is a review I wrote when I tried it two years ago when I dicovered they were selling it at the LCBO. . .

http://liquor-pig.blogspot.com/2008/12/per...8-absinthe.html

 

Anubis, that was pretty hilarious. If the Pernod was the first non-Czech absinthe you'd tried, I can see where it would be better than nothing. But in hindsight (and this is why we constantly need to update the "Top Ten Commercial Absinthes" thread), tastes and offerings change, and the relativity of reviews become important.

 

Thanks for the link!

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