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#31 Alan Moss

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 09:44 AM

Some people here might take issue with this:

"Bohemian: in which the licorice taste is significnatly (sic) reduced making it more useful as an ingredient in mixed drinks.

French: in which the licorice taste is dominant."

You seem to be implying that French (or perhaps French/Swiss style) absinthe is not suitable for mixed drinks. There are 104 cocktails with absinthe in the 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book. I believe approximately 104 of them were made with absinthe made in the French/Swiss style.
www.laclandestine.com: Hand-crafted in the birthplace of absinthe.

#32 Joe Legate

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 11:53 AM

It's a pretty discerning group of absinthe fans we have here, Steve. Don't expect them to be easily sold and don't give up trying to improve your website. I'm sure you know their advice is solid.

#33 Gwydion Stone

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 04:51 PM

I think the wording on the ban is sufficiently clear.

Grande Wormwood is the principal source of thujone, the component in Absinthe that was responsible for its being banned in the last century.

Actually, that's not quite true; thujone had nothing to do with the ban. It was not universally agreed even then that thujone was responsible for any deleterious effects, or that there was any problem aside from alcoholism. The reason absinthe was banned was the popular perception of wormwood as a poison and therefore injurious to public health, a perception that was carefully crafted by political interests in Europe.

The US felt it couldn't afford to ignore the fact that other countries were banning absinthe, as it would make them look passive and irresponsible. Considering the mounting pressure of the temperance movement, something had to give, and absinthe was a convenient scapegoat—at least for another eight years or so, and then all booze was banned.

Here's the entire text of the rule that banned absinthe:

F. I. D. 147. Issued July 25, 1912.

United States Department of Agriculture,
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY.

FOOD INSPECTION DECISION 147.

ABSINTH.

It is generally recognized in countries which have had experience with the sale and consumption of absinth that this beverage is dangerous to health. Belgium, Switzerland, and Holland have forbidden its manufacture, sale, and importation; absinth is also condemned by the laws of Brazil and its importation forbidden.

The Food and Drugs Act of June 30, 1906, section 11, forbids the importation of any food or drug which is “of a kind forbidden entry into, or forbidden to be sold or restricted in sale in the country in which it is made, or from which it is exported,” and also of any food or drug which is “otherwise dangerous to the health of the people of the United States.”

Importations of absinth into the United States, therefore, are prohibited, both because they come from countries which forbid or restrict its manufacture and sale, and because these products are injurious to the health of the people of the United States.

Section 7, paragraph 5, in the case of foods, of the Food and Drugs Act, June 30, 1906, provides further that an article shall be deemed to be adulterated within the meaning of the Act “if it contains any added poisonous or other added deleterious ingredient which may render such article injurious to health.” The beverage commonly known as absinth is a manufactured product containing wormwood, or absinth (Artemisia absinthium), an added deleterious ingredient. The interstate shipment of this product is, therefore, prohibited under this provision of the Food and Drugs Act.

The Secretary of Agriculture, therefore, will regard as adulterated under the Food and Drugs Act absinth which, on and after October 1, 1912, is manufactured or offered for sale in the District of Columbia or the Territories, or shipped in interstate commerce or offered for importation into the United States.

R. E. DOOLITTLE,
F. L. DUNLAP,
A. S. MITCHELL,

Board of Food and Drug Inspection.
Approved : JAMES WILSON, Secretary of Agriculture.
WASHINGTON, D. C., July 12, 1912.


An upcoming essay on the legal history of absinthe in the US will clarify matters even more.

Maker of Marteau Absinthe
Master Distiller, Gnostalgic Spirits Distillery
www.absinthemarteau.com
Confessions of an Absinthiste


#34 Meatwaggon

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 05:26 PM

The Secretary of Agriculture, therefore, will regard as adulterated under the Food and Drugs Act absinth which, on and after October 1, 1912, is manufactured or offered for sale in the District of Columbia or the Territories, or shipped in interstate commerce or offered for importation into the United States.

Hmm, may not manufacture, sell, ship or import absinthe starting October 1, 1912. But it seems to be easy even then to discern that possession and consumption of absinthe are not covered by the ruling in 1912. :cheers:
"A census taker once tried to test me. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Helfrich verte" - Anthony Hopkinns
"Leave the gun. Take the Rossoni" - Peter Clemenzza
"Give me wormwood, or give me death!" - Patrick Henrry
"I find your lack of louche....disturbing" - James Earl Jjones
"No maceration without distillation!" - Reverend Jonathan Mayhhew
"It is by absinthe alone I set my mind in motion" - Frank Herrbert

#35 Zman (Marc Bernhard)

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Posted 08 August 2008 - 09:37 PM

Some people here might take issue with this:

"Bohemian: in which the licorice taste is significnatly (sic) reduced making it more useful as an ingredient in mixed drinks.

French: in which the licorice taste is dominant."

You seem to be implying that French (or perhaps French/Swiss style) absinthe is not suitable for mixed drinks. There are 104 cocktails with absinthe in the 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book. I believe approximately 104 of them were made with absinthe made in the French/Swiss style.


And NONE of them were made with faux absinthe/absinth. This whole "Bohemian" designation regarding absinthe/absinth is nothing but a scam dreamed up in the late 1990's to sell crapsinthe (or more accurately "crapsinth").

If you don't like anise at all, you're not likely to care for any decent absinthe, as absinthe is an anise flavored drink. It's kind of like asking if there are any good beers that don't taste like hops or malt.----Hiram

Marc Bernhard, owner and Master Distiller of Pacific Distillery LLC
Maker of Pacifique Absinthe and Voyager Single Batch Distilled Gin
Woodinville, WA, USA
www.pacificdistillery.com


#36 dakini_painter

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 03:58 AM

Referring to FID 147, since all the referenced countries have repealed their bans on the manufacture, etc of absinthe, and that wormwood has been found by modern science not to be any more deleterious than other food or ingredient when used in amounts conforming to Goof Manufacturing Practice, doesn't this mean that the original grounds upon which FID 147 were based are false, and FID 147 should be rescinded? :devil:

"Good is the only investment that never fails." Thoreau.
"Don't you push me baby cause I'm holdin' low / and you know I'm only in it for the gold" Grateful Dead
Distiller and Proprietor, Delaware Phoenix Distillery, Walton, NY. DSP-NY-15019. www.delawarephoenix.com


#37 Wilson

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 04:10 AM

That would be the next step. I wouldn't rush that though.

#38 Gwydion Stone

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 05:54 AM

Um, read the news lately guys? FID 147 was made by the USDA, long before the formation of the FDA. All of the statutes governing food and drugs have been re-codified. But I like that "Goof Manufacturing Practice" idea. ;)

An upcoming essay on the legal history of absinthe in the US will clarify matters even more.


Maker of Marteau Absinthe
Master Distiller, Gnostalgic Spirits Distillery
www.absinthemarteau.com
Confessions of an Absinthiste


#39 dakini_painter

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Posted 09 August 2008 - 09:04 AM

You trying to say that the FDA doesn't have to follow what the USDA has said 96 years ago? Or are you saying that absinthe really hasn't been banned all these years?

I noticed the typing error and thought it was too funny to correct given the context. ;) (Dang! There's a fork in my eye!)

"Good is the only investment that never fails." Thoreau.
"Don't you push me baby cause I'm holdin' low / and you know I'm only in it for the gold" Grateful Dead
Distiller and Proprietor, Delaware Phoenix Distillery, Walton, NY. DSP-NY-15019. www.delawarephoenix.com



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