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absinthetric

The Return of L'Absinthe

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It was refreshing to hear someone specify that van Gogh cut off his ear LOBE, rather than lopping off entire ear, as many people believe.

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However, it was a bit annoying to hear him say 'thurjohn'

Could one of our French speakers give us the final word on this? The "R" definitely doesn't belong there, and the second syllable should rhyme, more or less, with "zone."

 

The "J" is a "zh", like "beige" or "Zsa Zsa."

 

But I wanna know more about the "TH"....

 

I dentalize the "T". That is, I touch the tip of my tongue against the BACK of my upper front teeth. I also drop the "H", so that it sounds more like "TOO" (with a Frenchy little "oo").

 

TOO-zhone.

 

We aspirate our "THs" in words like "think," and "bath." It's been decades since high school French, but I believe the French "TH" is different. Not aspirated.

 

OUI ou NON?

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The only thing really not to like was the little "representative" from Kübler saying that this is the "only" real absinthe around. Or something to that effect. Oh, and why can't some of these TV hosts just say "screw it" and go ahead and drink, for crissakes!

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Being by pronunciation, it was a bit strange that person who is supposed to represent Kübler, could not pronounce it properly, making it persistently "Kubler". Moreover "slow-drip" she mentions was just the quick power-louche that lasted few secs.

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Well I can understand she would do a power-louche demonstration for TV purposes (and it works fine with Kübler due to the relatively low alcohol content), but I agree it would have been nice to hear her specify that she was pouring faster than usual.

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Could one of our French speakers give us the final word on this? The "R" definitely doesn't belong there, and the second syllable should rhyme, more or less, with "zone."

You're right, the R doesn't belong here.

The second syllable rhyme exactly like PV said: "yun"

 

I dentalize the "T". That is, I touch the tip of my tongue against the BACK of my upper front teeth.

Right again.

 

We aspirate our "THs" in words like "think," and "bath." It's been decades since high school French, but I believe the French "TH" is different. Not aspirated.

We don't even care about the H, we just skip it, TH is T.

 

Thujone is "thuyone" in french, tuee-yun.

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So was the lady in the CBS Sunday Morning piece, I think. Are we all sure we have our facts straight, i.e. you and I vis a vis the pregnancies of various tv reporters?

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So the "j" in "thujone" is not the "j" as in "jaune", but the "y" as in "yellow".

 

That's wild. Thanks, guys.

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Yup. The CBS lady was VERY pregnant with twins at the time of her interview with Ted.

 

So, you're saying that, by coincidence, both reporters were preggers, i.e. the CBS one and the ABC one, and thus, neither could drink the absinthe that their story editors, presumably knowing their status, assigned them to?

 

If that don't beat all. If true, yet another condemnation of the drive-by media.

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So the "j" in "thujone" is not the "j" as in "jaune", but the "y" as in "yellow".

No, J is pronounced G and G is pronounced J in french.

 

But the french translation for "thujone" is "thuyone" (like the french translation for "boat" is "bateau").

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However, it was a bit annoying to hear him say 'thurjohn'

Could one of our French speakers give us the final word on this?

"Thujone" is a Latin neologism. It's a ketone named after its discovery source: Thuja occidentalis.

 

Loan words and formal study

When Latin words are spoken in a living language today, there is ordinarily little or no attempt to pronounce them as the Romans did. Myriad systems have arisen for pronouncing the language — at least one for each language in the modern world whose speakers learn Latin. In most cases, Latin pronunciation is adapted to the phonology of the person's own language.

 

So for us, it's thoo-jone.

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Since both pronunciations are correct (if "dʒ" seems to be less common in Europe), why not resort to other names that cause less confusion: absinthol, tanacetol, or tanacetone describing exactly the same?

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Because we don't listen to tansy eaters. :tongue:

 

When Boggy writes the great Polish novel, "Cofessions of a Tansy Eater", and we realize who he's the reincarnation of, it will all make sense...in a nonsensical kind of way. :twitchsmile:

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