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Meticulum

Greetings from the Maine Coast

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Hey folks,

 

Newbie, here. Have just begun my exploration of the world of absinthe and had eight different kinds recently arrive on my doorstep. It's been fascinating trying these.

 

Brief intro: I'm a headhunter 9-to-5 (biotech), but my real passion is a young heirloom fruit orchard that I'm slowly getting off the ground. When completed, it should contain around 220 varieties. Most are apples and hard to find old French pears, but there will also be a selection of unusual plums, peaches, apricots, cherries, strawberries and even medlars. I'm a few years away from opening the doors to the public, but I've very much been enjoying the process. It's truly a labor of love.

 

I've lived on an island off the coast of Maine (Vinalhaven) for the last 13 years, but my orchard is on the mainland in the town of Union, which is an hour and 20 minutes away by boat and another 25 minutes by car. One big lesson I've learned is that you can't watch deer from 40 miles away. Plans are to sell my house this year and build a little place in the orchard.

 

I was particularly intrigued to learn of the Creme de Violette in the Cocktail Club forum tonight. One of the apples we're growing--Kidd's Orange Red--is a NZ variety that is often described as tasting of Parma violets. I'm calling LeNells in Brooklyn tomorrow and ordering a few bottles of the CdV to see just what the heck Parma violets actually taste like.

 

Absinthes I've received thus far: Doubs Mystique, Jade PF 1901, Duplais Verte, Montmartre 65, St. George Absinthe Verte, Clandestine Recette Marianne, Clandestine Angelique Verte Suisse & Blanche Traditionelle "Brut d'Alambic" Essai 4. I hope to be adding six more to the list by year's end.

 

So far, I'm really diggin' the PF 1901 and the Doubs.

 

Cheers!

 

 

John

Edited by Meticulum

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You do realize that once you tried your third absinthe you became less of a n00b than I am, and I have been kicking around here for almost a year! Enjoy it!

 

Ahoy and Velcome to he from Vinalhaven.

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Quite a first order.

Your orchard sounds fantastic. Maggie and I have less than twenty varieties of fruit trees (cherries, apples, pears and plums) but they are both a pleasure and a pain. Labor of love, indeed. Yes, the deer do enjoy helping and our fat little cocker spaniel is no watch dog.

Nice Introduction.

Welcome to the Forum.

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Welcome, and nice first delivery. Especially the PF 1901!

 

I love juicy pears, of the variety known as 'slobberchops' to us in the North of England.

 

:cheers:

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John!

 

Greetings from (I believe) the only other Mainer on this site! Our fair state is finally beginning to "represent" as the cool kids say.

 

Welcome! :cheers:

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Thomas Slobberchops. I always wondered what a pear-headed man's last name might be.

 

 

:laf: I like it! It suits me! Henceforth let it be known to all that I, Thomas, have taken the name Thomas Septimus Sloberchopps, for all legal, financial and hereditary purposes from this day forth and for all perpetuity.

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Welcome! My favorite apple is the Braeburn.

Thomas Slobberchops....cannibal!!!!! Now i dont feel so freakish eating pork rinds.

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...and even medlars.

I love medlars. One of my hobbies is medieval cooking and a desert dish I've made to wonderful reviews is a medlar tart. The only problem is I've been unable to find a domestic source for medlars. The only source I've found that ships to the US is a company in France. Shipping cost me more than the product. And, I don't have the land to grow a medlar tree.

 

Anyway, welcome :cheers:

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Your orchard sounds fantastic. Maggie and I have less than twenty varieties of fruit trees (cherries, apples, pears and plums) but they are both a pleasure and a pain. Labor of love, indeed. Yes, the deer do enjoy helping and our fat little cocker spaniel is no watch dog.

 

The deer have come close to giving me ulcers, but I guess it's all part of having an orchard. I've finally given in to the fact that to keep the deer out, I need to bite the bullet this Summer and put in an 8' high-tensile wire fence, preferably with a roll of razor wire along the top. :) Last year I went out to the orchard to pick what should've been a bumper crop of cherries. The deer not only had eaten damn near every cherry, but had the audacity to literally suck the fruit off and leave the pits and stems intact, just so I knew actually how many cherries I didn't get.

 

I'm glad you're enjoying your trees. Thanks for the welcome.

 

 

John

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...and even medlars.

I love medlars.. . .The only problem is I've been unable to find a domestic source. The only source I've found that ships to the US is a company in France. Shipping cost me more than the product.

 

That's wonderful that you love medlars. I think most people unaccustomed to them are quite put off by the fact that you need to let them practically rot before they're at their peak. I've yet to eat one myself, but I find them utterly fascinating. I'm grafting all of the medlar trees going into the orchard this very week So needless to say, it'll be a few years before I've got any fruit to share. The plan though is to end up with 144 mature trees. I think having 'a gross of medlars' would be most appropriate.

 

Regarding sources, the place I'd suggest contacting is an orchard in S. Vermont known as Scott Farm. They planted 30 medlars a number of years ago and I believe the majority of people who buy the fruit are either folks who've immigrated from the Middle East or the people who run the farmers markets in NYC. I believe Scott Farm sells out every year though. The number for the place is 802-254-6868 and the guy who runs it is named Zeke.

 

Here's a wonderful article on medlars which also references Scott Farm:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/03/dining/03MEDL.html

 

I have a feeling David Karp isn't winning any friends in the absinthe community with the first line of the article, either. :laugh:

 

Let me know if you're able to get them.

 

 

6-Westerveld.jpg

 

 

John

Edited by Meticulum

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Greetings from (I believe) the only other Mainer on this site! Our fair state is finally beginning to "represent" as the cool kids say.

 

Another Mainuh! That's very kewl, as the cool kids say.

 

 

John

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Henceforth let it be known to all that I, Thomas, have taken the name Thomas Septimus Sloberchopps, for all legal, financial and hereditary purposes from this day forth and for all perpetuity.

 

Love the name. If I ever have the good fortune to be able to name a new juicy pear cultivar, Slobberchops would win hands down.

 

 

John

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I used to spend time looking through a great antique NY apple variety book. Welcome!

 

The Apples of New York. Great old book!

 

 

Thanks for the welcome, everybody. :)

Edited by Meticulum

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