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Did people way back when sit around with their noses to the glass watching the louche develop with smile, or did they simply want their beverage louched, and sipped, as soon as possible?

 

To my knowledge the only footage we have of Absinthe preparation "way back when" comes from anti-absinthe films, so the sloppy pouring shown in them shouldn't be taken as gospel (although it probably represents the way some people did it). Really I think you only need to look at vintage drippers to see that a slow preparation was the preferred method.

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Now here's a question, is the practice of really savoring the louche as it develops a modern, admirers invention?

 

 

There are written accounts that hail the virtues of slow drip preparation.

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Looking at the COLAs for Lucid and La Fee show they're both imported by MHW, Ltd.

I don't know if Viridian is the same as MHW, since each of the COLAs list both MHW and another company (Green Utopia for La Fee and Viridian for Lucid). They might be separate entities working together to import the different brands.

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It's no more complicated than getting a small pot of hot water with your cup and teabag.

Considering the number of restaurants I've been where trying to get hot tea was a dismal experience, I'm not reassured.

 

Though the British couple I met in Venice thought it was a quaint Americanism the way I asked for hot tea, stressing the 'hot'.

 

-- T

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Now here's a question, is the practice of really savoring the louche as it develops a modern, admirers invention?

There are written accounts that hail the virtues of slow drip preparation.

 

"One of the most evocative of all descriptions of the absinthe ritual is in Marcel Pagnol's The Time of Secrets:

 

 

"The poet's eyes suddenly gleamed.

Then, in deep silence, began a kind of ceremony.

He set the glass - a very big one - before him, after inspecting its cleanliness. Then he took the bottle, uncorked it, sniffed it, and poured out

an amber coloured liquid with green glints to it. He seemed to measure the dose with suspicious attention for, after a careful check and

some reflection, he added a few drops.

He next took up from the tray a kind of small silver shovel, long and narrow, in which patterned perforations had been cut.

He placed this contrivance on the rim of the glass like a bridge, and loaded it with two lumps of sugar.

Then he turned towards his wife: she was already holding the handle of a 'guggler', that is to say a porous earthenware pitcher in the shape

of a cock, and he said:

'Your turn, my Infanta!'

Placing one hand on her hip with a graceful curve of her arm, the Infanta lifted the pitcher rather high, then, with infallible skill, she let a very

thin jet of cool water - that came out of the fowls beak - fall on to the lumps of sugar which slowly began to disintegrate.

The poet, his chin almost touching the table between his two hands placed flat on it, was watching this operation very closely. The pouring

Infanta was as motionless as a fountain, and Isabelle did not breathe.

In the liquid, whose level was slowly rising, I could see a milky mist forming in swirls which eventually joined up, while a pungent smell of

aniseed deliciously refreshed my nostrils.

Twice over, by raising his hand, the master of ceremonies interrupted the fall of the liquid, which he doubtless considered too brutal or too

abundant: after examining the beverage with an uneasy manner that gave way to reassurance he signalled, by a mere look, for the

operation to be resumed.

Suddenly he quivered and, with an imperative gesture, definitely stopped the flow of water, as if a single drop more might have instantly

degraded the sacred potion." "

 

Nice!

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Clearly a company able to make PB's nightmare's reality.

I already live that nightmare, no importer necessary. I was only hoping you could save the motherland from such a fate. Alas.

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I dont think that Absinthe would ever get to that even if its very popular for the same reasons you dont see people drinking Cognac in clubs.

 

True; I feel the same way but I really feel in time and in small secluded places it will be as it was. And the places that cater to our type of crowd- that’s where I want to frequent.

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Now here's a question, is the practice of really savoring the louche as it develops a modern, admirers invention?

There are written accounts that hail the virtues of slow drip preparation.

 

By the Absinthe Route

Lewis R. Freeman, 1920

 

THE French islands of the South Pacific perform satisfactorily the regulation duty of all the other of that republic's tropical colonies-that of furnishing a retreat for a governor, secretary, judge and three or four other high officials during such time as they may require to accumulate fortunes sufficient to permit them to return to Paris and ease for a good portion, if not all the rest, of their lives; also for a small army of minor officials who have no chance to accumulate enough to take them to Paris. These latter young gentlemen work—or rather sit at desks—six hours a day, drink absinthe six hours, and dream absinthe dreams the remainder of the twenty-four.

 

***

 

"Where flaps the tri-colour, there flows the absinthe." You are not certain who first enunciated this great truth, nor where you first heard it; sufficient that it has become a law as inflexible as that of gravity. Haul down the one, and the other will cease to flow. Stop the flow of the other, and the one will cease to flap.

 

Certain French patriots who are strangers to the French tropics may indignantly question the truth of the latter statement; these you may respectfully request to cite you a single instance where those respective symbols of their republic are flapping and flowing independently.

 

***

 

He slipped through the door but a moment ago and the garçon had his glass of ice and bottle ready on the window ledge almost before he was seated. He spilled the absinthe over the sides of the glass in his eagerness to fill it, and in spite of the cracked ice it still must have been far from the delectable frappé of the connoisseur when he gulped it down. A second pouring of the warm liqueur took up the remaining ice and he has called for more.

 

***

 

Turn your attention again to the youth by the darkened window. A fresh glass of cracked ice is before him and he is pouring himself another drink. Ah! there is your real absinthe artist now. See with how steady a hand he pours that unvarying thread of a trickle; not faster than that must it go, not slower. See him turn the glass to the light to mark the progress of the green stain in the white body of the cracked ice. As it touches the bottom the pouring stops, the glass is twirled once or twice and then lifted to the lips and drained. Just as much water as a thread-sized trickle of warm absinthe will melt from the ice in finding its way to the bottom of the glass and back to the rim; offer it to him any other way, after those first mad gulps, and he would probably refuse it. Thus absinthe á la Cercle Colonial de Papeete.

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I believe I read both of those originally on Studiofox's site, very nice. I can never get enough of reading about absinthe.

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Well, I 'spose it's the overstatement of the year but to us and those like us, absinthe is more than a hobby; it’s a lifestyle. A love. Model railroad enthusiasts look forward to buying that new box car; we wait on the new Verte. Personally, I enjoy the company of those who are passionate about their lives and loves. I can never say how much I love this place. :thumbup:

 

Edit: As far as the slow louche' and history, I liken it to drinking a beer poured into a frosty glass versus from the bottle (dumbed down approach, if you will). I think some may have louched quick to drink while others did it as tradition notes simply because of the difference it makes.

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Frosty glasses water down the beer. Cold beer, room temp glass for me, thank you. :cheers:

 

Celler temperature beer. Room temperature glass. Good beer only, please. Handpulled, cask conditioned.

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Frosty glasses water down the beer. Cold beer, room temp glass for me, thank you. :cheers:

 

Celler temperature beer. Room temperature glass. Good beer only, please. Handpulled, cask conditioned.

 

 

Piss warm beer, cold pizza and some day old cheet-os with the bag left open just right so as to get the right consistancy. Not to chewy, but not to crisp.

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Frosty glasses in bars gross me out because the "frost" is the result of the third bin of dishwater that they rinse the glasses in before putting them back in the freezer *shudder*

 

And don't get me started on how gross the beer lines are in most commercial establishments!

 

I'll just have whatever it is in a bottle please!

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I generally don't drink beer in bars.

 

At home I have glassware appropriate for every kind of beer that I can get locally and I'm the type to order glasses if I'm ordering a beer I don't already have glassware for. I don't take this as far as getting the corresponding brand glass for each beer, but do I go according to beer style.

 

I never drink from a bottle. Someone was making fun of me the other day for it and I had her drink a beer from the bottle and said, "What does it smell like?" She couldn't detect much, and all she could get was from sticking the end of her nose in the bottle. I poured it in a good glass and then it opened up a world of aromas. She shut up.

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It's no more complicated than getting a small pot of hot water with your cup and teabag.

 

I in fact usually USE a small cheap metal teapot (from a restaurant supply store) when I fix mine at home. You've seen me use this in my Absinthe episode of the Cocktail Spirit on SmallScreenNetwork.com

 

-Robert

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And don't get me started on how gross the beer lines are in most commercial establishments!

 

I can still taste the swill from the early 80s at J.C. Fox's in Seattle after reading that line. :puke:

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I liken it to drinking a beer ...
Cold beer, room temp glass for me, thank you. :cheers:
Celler temperature beer. Room temperature glass. Good beer only, please.
Piss warm beer, cold pizza and some day old cheet-os...
I generally don't drink beer in bars.

 

What is this "beer"?

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You know, I’m not quite sure. I heard about it on television; some kind if malty-hop drink. It won’t louche though. Very disappointing. ;)

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You can't light it on fire either :laugh: </sarcasm> Speaking of beer I found that my local grocery store now has a full 100 ft aisle devoted to beer including five different ones from Shiner.

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What is this "beer"?

 

Nothing you'd want to trouble yourself over.

 

May I have my 3 liter bottle of 2001 Leviathan back now? :tongue: :devil:

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