Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I've got mine. I'll have to wait until after I run some errands to louche it up and post a review.

 

Upon first taste out of the bottle I can't say. It's pretty absinthey but also licoricey like it's got a strong star anise note in it. But tasting out of the bottle can be deceptive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine was waiting for me when I got home. Not sure when I'll get to try it, but damn that is a cool little bottle!!

 

Thanks again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It arrived safe and sound.

THANKS POOR!

Just dripped the first glass, looks like we have something

that the wife actually likes...

(Not sure if that's a good thing :) )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've posted my review on the main site.

 

I like it. It's not a really traditional absinthe but I dig it.

 

The only thing I don't like is that there are no traditional vertes released in the US yet except the awful piece of shit known as Lucid. I'm all for distilleries putting their own takes on things but if the result is no traditional absinthes here except ones that suck then that's total bullshit. I like traditional styles of absinthe and it would be really cool to be able to get some in my own country. Nobody's bitching that there's too many traditional absinthes overseas so it's not unreasonable to want to see a few here. It's gone from one extreme of only traditional absinthe being cool to the other extreme that only untraditional absinthe are cool and people who like more traditional absinthe need to get over it.

 

So how sweet did it taste to you Hiram?

Not. Definitely not. I used two cubes.

That's funny. I find it so incredibly sweet that it detracts from the overall experience to me. I tried sipping with my nose pinned shut to see if it was olfactory trickery instead of taste buds but it was still almost as sweet as a glass of F. Guy I tasted on New Year's Eve that had been sweetened with two cubes.

 

Much thanks to Poor for the sample.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My thanks to you, Poor!

I really enjoy this absinthe. In fact, will probably purchase a bottle. At least North Shore is on the right track.

I'm curious to see what the blanche will be like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every now and then I crawl out from my bunker to see what the sky looks like and buy absinthe (sorry, my dramatic way of saying I got busy). So, when I saw Sirene today at binny's and then this thread I panicked, bought a bottle of "batch 1" and wrote this post...

 

So far it tastes mighty good. Not like leave my family and run away with this bottle good, but good (I'm working on my review writing skilz...so far they're not good :blush: ) Needless to say, huzzah for more absinthe and binny's now has a great selection (lucid, sirene, Kübler...green moon :sarc: )

 

Whew!

 

PS. Speedle, I haven't forgotten about you! :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to lay off absinthe (and any sweets) for a couple days, see if I can get my anise detectors working again. Initially the dominant notes were the citrus/grapefruit flavors (not that it has those ingredients, but that's what I tasted most). My taste buds are weird.

 

Peridot, some things take time. More news soon I think. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Binny's is taking web orders, an order place on Tuesday arrived in Colorado today (Saturday).

 

They've been busy at North Shore Distillery, my bottles are labeled "Batch No. 3".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My sample arrived today, thanks Poor! The sample is larger than I expected, so yay for more than one glass. I know we'd already decided what the quantity would be, I just never bothered to measure it out before.

 

Bonus points for the cool bottle too. I'll post my review as soon as I get a chance to louche a glass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've posted my review on the main site.

 

I like it. It's not a really traditional absinthe but I dig it.

 

Can you elaborate on what you find untraditional about it? It may not be a Pontarlier-style, but I find it completely traditional. Anise up front, decent wormwood, no distracting or bizaare flavors. It could maybe use a bit more fennel to balance out the anise—which might be why you taste it as overly sweet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Binny's is taking web orders, an order place on Tuesday arrived in Colorado today (Saturday).

 

They've been busy at North Shore Distillery, my bottles are labeled "Batch No. 3".

 

Thanks for the info, and they actually ship to PA.

Poor's sample gone, order placed.....

:yahoo:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woot! Sirene in my hands! Thanks a bunch poor, talk about mega-sample! Way larger than I expected. I'm drinking my first glass now, and I must say I quite like it. Less than Jade but more than Monty. To me, I like the grassy scent when louching and in the aftertaste. My first impression is that of an Ike but where someone turned up the "heavyness" or richness a bit. Overall, very nice and I look forward to taking a bit more time during the week up next to write an actual review.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can you elaborate on what you find untraditional about it?

I've had it some more so I can expand a little on my review. It's candy-like. I've had beverages with only anise and no fennel. None have been sweet like this is. The degree of sweetness is greater than any unsugared absinthe I've ever had by far. The candy-like aspect is reinforced by the Big Red Gum flavour I detect. It simply tastes weird and yes I do taste bizarre flavours. I like it but if it's a traditional absinthe I'm a zebra. Closer than St. George to traditional but still weirder than Montmartre in my opinion, which to me has two weird flavors followed by a very traditional absinthe character. In this the traditional absinthe taste might be there but it has to compete against too many other things. As I said, it tastes like my fennel tea. I wonder if there's licorice root in it. The more I sip it the more peppermint I taste, and it competes with the anise, which itself seems a bit acrid and more black-licoricey than, let's say, the anise in Lucid.

 

As I said I like it. But I would like it a lot more if it were a lot less sweet.

 

By the way, I'm not tasting the citrus. So wow, maybe we all taste things differently. Perhaps the things I find untraditional you don't taste at all, while I don't taste the citrus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Entirely possible. Remember the endless "sweatsock funk" arguments about F. Guy? Some got it, some didn't.

 

The citrus comes out for me most in the finish, but it's not a lemon or orange juice, sour/tart citrus, it's more like citronella, which would come from Melissa. I've become cautious about divining botanicals in absinthe ever since I said something about the fennel in F. Guy. But I feel better since Absomphe waxed rhapsodic about the coriander in Marteau, which contains none. On second thought, I'm not so sure that makes me feel better.

 

I'm sure that what's sweetening Sirène for you is the mint. I don't particularly care for mint in absinthe at all and it puts me off usually. Totally candyfies it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That contrasts to Clandestine Recette Marianne, which has a very dry peppermint flavour. I also think the mint in CRM is more balanced and plays more of a supporting herb role. The more I taste Sirene the more the mint seems to stand out.

 

I was just talking to some people about the sweatsock funk of F. Guy. I can't taste it but I can taste all sorts of funky and off-putting flavours that bother me in Lucid and PF1901. I wonder what the difference is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't getting a big mint feel, but the sweetness was definitely noticable from the very first glass. I'll keep tasting it and see what other angles I can find on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's amazing how everyone's taste is different. I actually taste the mint a lot followed by the citrus notes and then wormwood. To me. there is a candy-like quality to it, but I still like it. I wish there was a little more wormwood, but then again, I always do. The tea quality Peridot is describing must be the slight grassy taste I noticed. Although, that was mainly in the finish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't tried the Sirene.....yet. I'm curious about the grassy taste. I've noticed that mentioned several places, not just Sirene. Some opinions mentioned it having something to do with the coloring herbs and methods. Perhaps it will drop out with age.

 

Other than that, it sounds delightful. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've become cautious about divining botanicals in absinthe ever since I said something about the fennel in F. Guy. But I feel better since Absomphe waxed rhapsodic about the coriander in Marteau, which contains none. On second thought, I'm not so sure that makes me feel better.

 

I'm sure that what's sweetening Sirène for you is the mint. I don't particularly care for mint in absinthe at all and it puts me off usually. Totally candyfies it.

 

I also tasted coriander in the PF 1914 (as did Prole), but Zman swears that Pernod Fils never used coriander in their recipe, and I have no reason to disbelieve him. So, yes, I agree that attributing specific herbs to an absinthe can be a tricky business. I certainly wouldn't have expected my palate to interpret celery seed as coriander.

 

As far as mint is concerned, very little goes a really long way, so perhaps Sirene just contains too much of it, and it somewhat overpowers the other flavors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say that it overpowers anything, and certainly not enough to be called "minty" if that implies a cooling menthol crispness. I think it's in balance, just not my personal favorite herb in absinthe.

 

I certainly wouldn't have expected my palate to interpret celery seed as coriander.

Maybe it didn't; celery seed is only one botanical I've mentioned in Marteau, there are eleven.

 

I also tasted coriander in the PF 1914 (as did Prole), but Zman swears that Pernod Fils never used coriander in their recipe, and I have no reason to disbelieve him.

 

Let's learn from history (FV):

I found a substantial taste and aroma of coriander in the Edouard, and those who tasted it with me pretty much agreed. There were some very unusual tastes and aromas in it that forced me to think outside the box in terms of what we know goes into absinthe: maple and marjoram in the fragrance and celery in the finish.
I've been told by someone who should know that there is an ingredient in that old stuff, in fact, common to surviving examples of DIFFERENT brands of old stuff, not mentioned in any of the texts we treasure.
After tasting the Edouard, I wouldn't find that surprising. It was quite educational.
Maple...definitely..I haven't tasted it yet (waiting for my bottle of Jade Eddie to come in for comparison,) but maple is one of the overwhelming scents that comes out as soon as the bottle is opened.

 

Here's a post I made a while back about the PF 1910 Cannes cache (edited for language and clarity):

My first reaction: Damn, this is [more bitter than I expected]. It also tastes perfumed.

... Unless the species, cultivars, what-have-you, have changed considerably in the last 95 years, there is no way in hell that this was made from the basic six Pontarlier ingredients; I don't care about Pernod's literature or the manuals. No, it's not aging or oils breaking down, this has flavors distinctly different from any Pontarlier (or any other absinthe) I've ever had. I'm not sure what they are.

 

That celery thing I tasted in the pre-ban Edouard? I think that was aged fennel. This has a touch of that but way more mild. The maple thing is also there, but not as strong either. Then there's all that other stuff going on. Who knows. Comments?

You are on drugs.

 

There were about a dozen present who tasted the Edouard, trying to put our finger on the aromas, but everyone was stuck on "traditional" ingredients we know from the books. When I mentioned maple, marjoram and celery, almost everyone agreed enthusiastically, and we all then tried to figure out what could create those aromas. It's funny how things change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still believe that there is no coriander in the vintage PF, every sample of preban PF I've tasted it's not there. However, I truly believe that coriander is a part of E.Pernod and Berger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you mentioned about a dozen present, is what I struggle with when drinking alone. you had folks around with opinions and suggestions. I have read the recipes of a few absinthes with little doubt of the accuracy. Still, the final product seemed like something different.

 

Opinions from others in a group have helped (?) me identify certain things. One example, and this is drifting I know, I tasted something like bubble gum in one and rubber band in another. I ain't right!

 

After the laughter died down the discussions continued.

 

It's good to drink with people and compare notes. I'll ramble no more for now. Thank you for your time.

 

:cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad they all seem to have arrived, I wanted to add nifty labels to them all, but after filling and waxing all of them I wanted little else then to have them out of my sight! Can't wait to buy another bottle after I get paid on friday, I think I will throw another absinthe party.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When you mentioned about a dozen present, is what I struggle with when drinking alone. you had folks around with opinions and suggestions. I have read the recipes of a few absinthes with little doubt of the accuracy. Still, the final product seemed like something different.

 

Opinions from others in a group have helped (?) me identify certain things. One example, and this is drifting I know, I tasted something like bubble gum in one and rubber band in another. I ain't right!

 

After the laughter died down the discussions continued.

 

It's good to drink with people and compare notes. I'll ramble no more for now. Thank you for your time.

 

:cheers:

 

In beer tastings there are many references to flavors that are not from ingredients, but from the fermentation. Bubblegum is very common in warmer fermented beers, fitting of the style in belgians and some bigger german wheat beers, but not proper in others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. Totally. I mean, look at what happens with scotch and rum and whiskey, just from sitting in scorched wood for awhile. There is no vanilla, no tobacco, and no peaches, pears, or apples in Glenlivet, but some people taste some or all of those things. Oh, and I forgot chocolate!

 

So, I don't think that one can directly divine what goes into a distilled beverage just from flavors alone, even though clearly in this case there is no wood, no scorching, and no ageing in said wood to "add" flavors.

 

Having said that, what about the coloring step? Does the length of time the tea bag sits in the distilate influence to what depth the various flavors are pulled out of the herbs in addition to deepening the color? Also, as in actual tea steeped too long, can "off" flavors be pulled out of the plant material, or perhaps even just result in a combination that ends up differently than you might expect given what went into the tea bag?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speedle

I was in the process of posting a comment and saw your full post.

You posted what I was thinking! :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine arrived Friday, thank you Poor!

 

I've just had one small glass and it's not bad. Traditional enough I suppose. Perhaps it's based on a Fougerolles recipe? It definitely has some mint in there.

 

I'll try writing a proper review later this week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×