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I'm in Southern California so the internal temperature doesn't change much. My water/ice prep is nearly identical each time. I'm convinced there is a property of each absinthe that affects differences in how visible the trails are early on. Perhaps it's related to alcohol content? They seemed particularly abundant in the Sirene, which is why I mentioned them in the review. Maybe it has to do with the "thicker" consistency of it? Or perhaps the more visible the trails are the closer it is to beginning to louche? I don't know. But it would be interesting if there was some type of information that could be gathered from what is a relatively easily observable effect. Perhaps not any sort of measure of quality but maybe of consistency or something.

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The difference in amount of trails is probably due to differences in how cold your water is and how warm your absinthe is.

Sounds like its time for Shabba to do another experiment! :cheers:

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The difference in amount of trails is probably due to differences in how cold your water is and how warm your absinthe is.
Well, not really. The latest set of pics I posted were with cool water from a fork prong dipped into the absinthe. By the time I finished the last shots it was room temp. I think it's more like Hiram said, just the fact of mixing water with oily booze in the perfect light with backdrop.

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I hear ya, and I didn't realize that maybe this topic had been somewhat heavily debated in the past...
:laf: They've been called "sugar fights". There are still a few who stubbornly assert that "a well made absinthe doesn't need sugar," and a few who appear to think that their no-sugar preference indicates that they're hard, hairy, he-men with bull-balls. The irony that they're drinking absinthe, of all things, apparently escapes them.

 

Perhaps not any sort of measure of quality but maybe of consistency or something.
Exactly. Different density. Different temps, different ABV, all could have an effect on the effect.
Sounds like its time for Shabba to do another experiment!

Science!

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Did someone say my name? Oh, you wrote Retro-Post, she's my cousin.

 

"But doesn't she look almost exactly like Laura Palmer?" :cheers:

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I sent them back to the future last week, but Biff Tannon intercepted the shipment and in the future became a millionaire. I traveled back to a 1985 that had skewed into an alternate reality where he is a millionaire distillery owner. I threw a can of Tab at his head and somehow everything ended up O.K.

 

I shipped the packages today 2-day.

 

I can't wait for you folks to get your vinegar.

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They've been called "sugar fights". There are still a few who stubbornly assert that "a well made absinthe doesn't need sugar," and a few who appear to think that their no-sugar preference indicates that they're hard, hairy, he-men with bull-balls. The irony that they're drinking absinthe, of all things, apparently escapes them.

 

That accursed hegemonic masculinity... it led me to try and go sugarless... and then I paid for it when I missed my ideal ratio... I can't quit you, hegemonic masculinity (or can I??!), but I'll give you the best pacifist ass-whuppin' you've ever had... with my pinky straightened as I sip creamy, anise-y goodness. Take that!

 

Side note: certainly there is a genetic component to taste tendencies, but somehow or other I was able to go from "cilantro is disgusting" to "cilantro ain't half bad," surprising even me! Who knows whether it is neuroplasticity at work, or my experience/efforts de-/activating genes, but I'm just glad I can eat more food! :twitchsmile:

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Cilantro is Spanish for "Tastes like dish soap and ruins your meal if a leaf gets on your tongue".

 

At least I think so...

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You may have a certain genetic trait in which you have an enzyme that makes you perceive the flavor as soapy and or funky. This has been mentioned several times in some culinary resources I peruse. Most people liken it to parsley with a bit of a citrusy twist, but not those with that enzyme.

 

I love cilantro. However, I would like to pick a few knits. Cilantro is a predominant ingredient in MEXICAN food, not SPANISH food. ;)

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I knew you were the gorilla my dreams, you sexy thang! :wub:

 

Just between you and me, though, I think you could use a support bra.

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Hey, let's get the facts straight Shabba, the picture I posted was before you drank the potion, as you well know. The gorilla is what came an hour later. Having said that, you sure do look pretty in pink!

Have I got time to get over there before it wears off?

 

Oh, and I have a present for you.

post-702-1210176512.jpg

 

Like what you see? Well, there's plenty more where that came from!

 

Absomphe....step aside buddy, she's mine!

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Dear god, this thread went sooo wrong.

 

Got my Sirène today. Not at all bad. Unique, but far more trad than St. George, beautiful louche. It think most will be pretty happy with it.

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This was waaayy outta control!

 

And, no, no sample yet, I don't expect it until Thursday at the earliest. Monkeys are slow round these parts.

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