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If we're talking 3 months between batches & being able to tweak a recipe

The batches I've made were pretty good after a couple weeks. I use everclear 190 proof. After the zest is white I see no problem in continuing the process. Besides, after you've made a batch or three, you have plenty to sip for quite a spell. I'll be backing off the sugar a bit on my next batch.

 

The stuff is delightful. JMO

 

To you and your experiments, Cheers!

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Meriam-Webster says I'm a-okay!

 

 

 

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/suicided

 

 

I stand corrected.

 

 

 

 

c'mon, this is teh intranets. It's COOL to be loosey-goosey with grammar, punctuation, spelling, ...intelligence. You want to be part of the in crowd, right?

 

What is this in crowd you speak of?

 

 

 

...wrist-slaps, thumbscrews, nipple clamps...

 

 

It scares me when you talk dirty.

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What is this in crowd of which you speak?

 

There, fixed.

 

After all, we wouldn't want to be all loosey-goosey with our grammar and end our sentences with prepositions, now would we?

 

It might give the new guy ideas. :rolleyes:

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Ideas. Hmmm.

I took the fruit out of the various "cellos" and turned them into liqueurs. What to do with all those leftover blackberries, raspberries, gooseberries and blue berries that had been giving their all to those lovely beverages (and soaking in 95% alcohol)?

 

I made some kick-ass adult ice cream! That desert will put you on your backside damn quick.

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Hmm. Care to post some recipes so that others might give them a shot?

 

 

Get it...shot?

 

 

 

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

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Make ice cream, fold in fruit and freeze (hopefully). A gazillion brain cells die with every gooseberry popped. Any serving larger than a tablespoon is sheer madness. It definitely tastes better than an unlouched absinthe soaked sugar cube. :cheerz:

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:cheers: Thanks Jules.

 

Prickly pears have been scrubbed, peeled, and seeded. They are now taking a refreshing bath in everclear. :twitchsmile:

 

 

 

 

 

And my fingers look like I robbed a bank.

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Anyhoo, I started up my first batch today. I think I about crippled myself trying to peel those limes.

 

I'm trying:

 

10 lime peels (too few?) = roughly 1/8 lb

1/3 lb quartered cherries

1 L everclear (190 proof)

 

Later, add syrup:

3 c water

2.5 c sugar

 

On paper, how does it look? Would you increase/decrease the ratios on the syrup? Any critiques would be appreciated.

 

I'm hopeful that using the everclear vs the everclear/vodka combo will speed up the rate that the oils leech out of the peels. I saw a suggestion on a blog where someone placed all the peels in a grain bag (for beer) and had a lot less mess removing them at the filtering stage. I'm going to try that next time.

Edited by Rouver

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Only a couple more weeks! I've been checking the lime peels every week to see if they've crisped up a little early, but no dice. I'm half tempted to just go ahead anyway. :) They don't break like a potato chip, but they seem crispy on the sides, but do bend quite a bit before breaking.

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I have been given that recently. Selected (IGP :devil: ) lemons, quite potent as limoncellos/limoncinos go, is really tasty when straight from the freezer, might be good for cocktails and ice-cream.

 

Anyone has had?

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I started making lemoncello 2.5 months ago.

 

Initially the lemon zest was in the alcohol for two (or more) weeks, until all the zest lost their color to the alcohol. I added some whole vanilla beans (cut along the main axis) with the zest (recipe of my friend from Palermo).

 

Then I filtered with a beer strain bag, added sugar and water in a large bottle and kept for two months. Once in while I had a whirling motion of that bottle.

 

After two months I filtered again. However, I used a combination of a beer strain bag + cotton + cloth. The filtering was really slow, it took me a full day to filter 2 liters. The color is clear yellow (no more opacity as before).

 

Now I have the lemoncello in 3 bottles, and in accordance to my italian friend I need to wait it to age for at least two more months. I tasted and it and it is already kind of good, but I will wait until Xmas to serve in a party.

 

cheers,

 

- Marcelo

Edited by mgs

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I wasn't happy with the flavor profile of the blueberry or peach cello I did, so I'm letting both batches of pricklypearcello steep a bit longer than the first two. One has a higher concentration of pricklypears to alcohol than the other, and it has a better color. The other...has more of a rose color and the fruit has blanched a bit. There are still plenty of fruit on several of the plants, some are still a little green, so there might be time for another batch...

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The first one I tried making a few years ago was a disaster. I don't know if either of these will be good, but I'm sure they'll be better.

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The color is clear yellow (no more opacity as before).

Same here. Despite the CO brands tend to be opaque, even if I add some fresh lemon juice, it is still quite clear. My brand new version is limoncino gold (more golden in colour and sweetened with cane sugar)-a variety. And, IMHO, it is better to steep in alcohol and water mixture (45-50%) than just alcohol (96%) or just vodka (40%), the peels yield everything to the medium strength, while 96% is too strong and does not extract everything.

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The best lemoncello I've ever had was opaque, and homemade. Hopefully Joe hid the bottle away from me for good.

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The best lemoncello I've ever had was opaque, and homemade. Hopefully Joe hid the bottle away from me for good.

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The best lemoncello I've ever had was opaque, and homemade. Hopefully Joe hid the bottle away from me for good.

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have my first jug hidden in the pantry. It's had a couple of weeks to yellow, so I bought some water last night and will water the stuff most of the way down today. I photochopped up some labels, and so some is staying with us and some is going out with Christmas presents.

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So. I did learn that, yes, you really have to let the syrup-infusion mixture sit for a few days to mellow. I was just so eager to get an idea of how my lime-cherry-cello had turned out, I poured a bit over ice right after filtering the fruit & mixing w/ the cooled simple syrup. I could have ignited my breath. I was worried I hadn't diluted my batch enough, but now, after a week, it seems like the alcohol content is about right. I definitely needed to add more cherries. I was really careful about not getting any pith on the lime peels, but there's just a bit of bitterness to it. I don't know if I need to reduce the steeping time or increase the sugar content.

 

Since cherries are out of season, I thought I'd try a limon-orange-cello next.

 

Has anyone tried one w/ ginger? I know there's some commercially available, but I was wondering if we have anyone in here w/ personal experience.

 

 

Initially the lemon zest was in the alcohol for two (or more) weeks, until all the zest lost their color to the alcohol. I added some whole vanilla beans (cut along the main axis) with the zest (recipe of my friend from Palermo).

 

Sounds tasty. I might have to try vanilla beans some time.

 

Then I filtered with a beer strain bag, added sugar and water in a large bottle and kept for two months. Once in while I had a whirling motion of that bottle.

 

After two months I filtered again. However, I used a combination of a beer strain bag + cotton + cloth. The filtering was really slow, it took me a full day to filter 2 liters. The color is clear yellow (no more opacity as before).

 

Now I have the lemoncello in 3 bottles, and in accordance to my italian friend I need to wait it to age for at least two more months. I tasted and it and it is already kind of good, but I will wait until Xmas to serve in a party.

 

I wonder if there's a 'best' way or just 'different' ways of getting to a good limoncello.

 

I let mine stand w/ just the alcohol for 6 wks, filtered w/ cheesecloth then through a coffee filter (took an hour) THEN mixed it w/ the syrup. I was filtering a smaller volume, plus I peeled my limes rather than zesting. Both of those had to speed up the filtering process. On the other hand, my finished product is cloudy (happened right when I mixed the clear syrup with the clear infusion.)

 

 

I wasn't happy with the flavor profile of the blueberry or peach cello I did

 

What was the problem with it? Bad flavor combo, or did the fruits not give up much of their flavor?

 

Same here. Despite the CO brands tend to be opaque, even if I add some fresh lemon juice, it is still quite clear.

 

Do you also combine the infusion & syrup earlier in the process then filter the whole thing at the end?

 

 

And, IMHO, it is better to steep in alcohol and water mixture (45-50%) than just alcohol (96%) or just vodka (40%), the peels yield everything to the medium strength, while 96% is too strong and does not extract everything.

What has led you to believe this? Have you run side-by-side batches to compare? Have you just been making cellos for years & years? I ask because I'm curious and want to make the best cellos I can. :)

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I was a little worried about being able to drink roughly 2L of liquor all by ourselves, but we've consumed over 30% of our batch in 9 days. Clearly the fact that you could feel the alcohol evaporating off your tongue wasn't enough to keep us from sipping at it the first few days.

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Do you also combine the infusion & syrup earlier in the process then filter the whole thing at the end?

I first add to the freshly-made syrup (so quite a hot one) the alcoholate, a little lemon juice (10-20ml per 350ml) and filter it thereafter. I make limoncino for Mother's Day. Since I began dabbling in it (2007), I have made several batches.

 

 

What has led you to believe this? Have you run side-by-side batches to compare? Have you just been making cellos for years & years? I ask because I'm curious and want to make the best cellos I can. :)

At first, I was macerating in plain vodka, so 40%, then I have switched to spirit proofed to 47.5% and it was giving more body to the liqueur and bringing the aromas quicker. Also, having a stronger alcoholate, I can adjust the addition of sugar syrup more conveniently. My limoncino is usually in the range 21-25%.

Edited by Boggy

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