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Z_for_Zendetta

Seeking Elaboration on the FAQ

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Differences in people's physiology will result in different "effects". Like how ridalin makes children mellow but stimulates adults. Also, never underestimate the power of the mind to fabricate "effects" when it's expecting to experience "effects".

 

My mental acuity seems inhanced with absinthe rather than sluggish like with any other hard liquor or fermented beverage. I suspect it may be from the herbs and sugar.

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I would use exactly the same description as the Gimp.

 

But the fact that this forum is tending towards a happy, centrist "it's different for everybody" just proves how under-studied this subject is. I would like to get out of the generalities, and into the specifics. Because I have a cat problem, and I heard curiosity is an effective cure.

 

I mean, apart from discrediting 'thujone, has there been any major scientific discoveries regarding the real effects of absinthe?

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I don't pretend to be as knowledgeable as many here who have spent a great deal more time and effort studying absinthe in a serious manner.

 

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However, from reading the Wormwood Society resources and those compiled by Oxy (I take it you checked them out too and didn't find anything), it would appear that the majority of hard core scientific research has been focused on investigating the myths and old science surrounding absinthe. Not to mention trying to determine just what the makeup of authentic absinthe was.

 

It seems there's been so much work that's had to be done debunking long standing misinformation (eg thujone, trippin' ballz, insanity, blindness, magic powers, missing chunks of ear, copious amounts of cat barf, ect.) that the time and resources haven't been available to conclusively study the specific question you posed.

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Ted Breaux has said that he thinks it's the combination of all the herbs, some stimulant, some relaxant, that equal a kind of "herbal speedball" effect.

 

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but to properly conduct a scientific study on exactly what causes the effects of absinthe, I'd think one would have to do extensive FDA approval style testing on all the different botanicals, how each one interacts with the next one, how they all interact with each other, using proper sized study subject groups and control groups, ect., ect...The mind boggles :dribble:

 

It seems like there's still ongoing debate and research on much more widely used and widely available substances, such as caffeine and coffee, to this day. Or even the medicinal properties of various herbs used since ancient times (e.g. modern western medicine vs. traditional eastern medicine).

 

My apologies if any of my post is incorrect or rambling. What was I saying? Oh yeah, science rulz!!! :bguitar:

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I mean, apart from discrediting 'thujone, has there been any major scientific discoveries regarding the real effects of absinthe?

 

No.

 

Dr. Dirk Lachenmeier in Germany seems to be the only researcher looking at absinthe.

 

 

I for one wouldn't want the FDA poking too closely into the herbs in absinthe. While many of the herbs listed in the manuals by Duplais etc are on the FDA GRAS list, or EAFUS, some are outright banned (Calamus spp.), others weren't used extensively enough in the 50's to be included when the lists were initially compiled (Veronica spp.).

 

The FDA would love to shut down the whole herbal/vitamin supplements industry because they consider it filled with crackpots and people should be going to "real doctors". Any time they even hint at that, the outcry is large enough to keep things the same.

 

Let sleeping dogs lie.

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What DP said.

 

If you want to invest a million dollars on your own study and find out for yourself, be my guest. Don't tell me though.

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That could be it. I never, ever dream, which is why the difference has been so noticeable.

Every last person dreams. It's just that many of us adults don't remember our dreams in the morning when we wake up. I only remember about 1 dream a year now, and every last time was because I was woken up during or soon after my dream. When I was a little boy, I could recall every night's dream the next day.

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The only experience I have is with Kübler. At first, I wasn't too sure about secondary effects. As I've had time to think about it, and the bottle is nearing it's end, I have noticed 2 things about the Kübler that differs from any other alcohol I have consumed. The first thing is that my appetite is unaffected by it. The second was clearly brought to my attention last night: nightmares. I suffer many nightmares several times a week. The times I drank the Kübler, I had no nightmare. I actually don't remember any of my dreams, but I wasn't screaming in the middle of the night. Perhaps I can get a doctor to prescribe Kübler to me?

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Man, that sucks that you have chronic nightmares. And it's good that absinthe helps.

 

But I have to say, when I drink absinthe I end up needing lots of food very soon afterward.

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Yeah, that's true that "not dreaming" really just means that you don't remember your dreams. But the point is, I usually don't. When I go through a night of :cheers: I usually end up having weird, colorful dreams at night, like a rerun of Fantasia. There's all sorts of herbal stuff online being advertised as "dream-enhancers," notably mugwort. Of course, somebody posted in this thread that they know a thing or two about mugwort and haven't seen it do anything to peoples' dreaming. I'll be able to procure some green fairy next weekend, with a full range of herbs in the recipe, and I'll see if they have any effect on my dreaming (and recollection of dreaming).

Edited by Z_for_Zendetta

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I suffer many nightmares several times a week. The times I drank the Kübler, I had no nightmare. I actually don't remember any of my dreams, but I wasn't screaming in the middle of the night.

 

I wonder if the alcohol is disrupting your sleep cycle such that you aren't entering REM sleep or at least not long enough to trigger the nightmares. BTW, you can write your own Rx for that medication. ;)

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I wonder if the alcohol is disrupting your sleep cycle such that you aren't entering REM sleep or at least not long enough to trigger the nightmares. BTW, you can write your own Rx for that medication. ;)

 

That's a valid argument; however, my nightmares tend to worsen when I drink other alcohols. The Kübler is a striking contrast to this. In truth, I rarely drink. The fact that I have been drinking the Kübler on a very consistent basis lately leads me to believe that the lack of nightmares is not simply coincidence. Further, it never even occurred to me that the two were linked until this thread, and the talk of vivid dreams. Therefore, with such conclusive evidence, it is imperative that I drink absinthe every night to keep the demons away... :devil:

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But it makes sense that you can drive more oils out of solution at colder temperatures and ...

Solubility of liquid (and solid) solutes generally decreases at lower temperatures. It's as simple as that.

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