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Roquette 1797

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So I decided to relax and open my new bottle of Roquette. Quite the Absinthe if I do say so thus far.

 

Louching was done with a Carafe as my fountain was drying and taken apart. No sugar added either. glass used was a cordon.

 

Preparation:

I opened the bottle and let it breathe for a good 10-12 minutes while I stocked the dishwasher and put on some light jazz. After the 12 minutes. I poured it into the cordon glass and let it breath for an additional 10 minutes.

 

Color:

Color was a very natural emerald green with crystal clear transparency. Better than some of the others I've seen which also reside on my bar. No traces of residue other than a small speck of wax from the t-cork sealant (but you didn't need to know that did you, because it's my fault it got in there). After holding it up to the light you can really see it's transparent properties. Overall very pretty:

 

Aroma:

Aroma before louche was actually a bit unexpected. While not terrible, based on what I'd read I figured it'd be a bit more characteristic and in line with the praise often awarded to the Jades. While the traditional anis notes were present with a supporting herbal bouquet, there was a bit of an overpowering alcohol note which when didn't even out even after letting the bottle and glass breathe for a 10-12 minutes each. While still not as "alcohol" based as the fragrance from the Un Emile 68. It was not something I was expecting from the Roquette.

 

Louche:

This is where it started to get good. Total Louche time was 9 minutes and change from a carafe. The first 3 minutes I was treated to quite the active dance of oil trails. This is probably one of the most active and mesmerizing louche-introductions I've seen to date. Louching started after about 3.5 minutes of dripping the water slowly. The Louche itself took some time to develop and was a bit on the thin side while still maintaining opacity from the side. Not terrible by any means but even when fully louched some depth could be seen from the side of the glass. Reservoir was outlined with a slight amber hue and a bit more translucent than the main portion of the glass.

 

Looking top down I could faintly see the bottom of the glass a bit. A thin louche seems to be a characteristic of this absinthe, though as I said. It's not at all ugly. for a 9 minute drip. I didn't even notice that I was losing feeling in my right arm. It was interesting and lively to watch.

 

 

Aroma After:

As usual, the louche really opened up the bouquet which permeated throughout the air as a most desirable fragrance. Gone were any traces of alcohol notes which were present pre-louche. The fragrance was quite herbal with strong notes of anis/fennel, also with supporting compliments from a seemingly complex array of herbs. The ever-so-slightest trace of what seemed to be citrus was also present.

 

 

Flavor:

Very Desirable. Sweet enough to possibly even warrant sugar lovers to try it without. While this is a bit sweeter than some, it doesn't at all taste artificial or overpowering. Just the natural sweetness of Anis/Fennel with prevalent notes of wormwood. There is definitely a spicy note worth mentioning, but even so still offers a refreshingly clean and well complimenting taste. All elements that make up the Roquette's flavor really complements one another. There is a definitely sense of balance with the Anis/Fennel/wormwood leading the pack as they should be.

 

 

Finish:

Feels good in the mouth with a quick swirl or 2. Not thick and syrupy, even a bit thin while still maintaining a smooth and creaminess. Upon swallowing one will observe a dryness which almost states that the Roquette has cleaned up after itself without leaving any unwanted aftertaste. A subtle taste of sweet anis is all that's left in one's mouth after a few short moments.

 

 

Overall:

Aside from the initial Alcohol notes observed during the pre-louched fragrance, and louche which finishes on a bit of the thin side, the Roquette definitely proves to be a great absinthe through and through. Definitely one of my favorites thus far along with the Duplais. Looking forward to my next glass sooner rather than later.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well there you have it; my first review. If it's acceptable, I'll go ahead and post it on the review section of the main site along with the ratings. For now, there's a pillow with my name on it.

 

 

 

-PC (I'm anything but)

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Zactly.

 

In fact, I'd venture to say that as a first-time review, this is one of the most well thought out and well constrcuted reviews I've seen.

 

Well done!

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I only see one glaring omission in this review -

 

Exactly what light jazz you were you listening to?

 

Seriously, though - a damn excellent review. Kudos to you.

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Exactly what light jazz you were you listening to?

 

 

Thelonious Monk.

 

I'll also add that next time I'll be a little more awake when I'm writing. The grammar after reading it this morning is making me cringe and the edit button is a woman/one night stand who has since left me.

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Thelonious Monk.

 

Mmmmmm, brother you're making me homesick. Great review, great memory. Thanks for sharing it.

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Ok folks I've gone ahead and posted this to the main WS site. Thanks for your compliments.

 

 

Just out of curiosity though, I noticed that my review was about 7 times longer than others on the site. What is the general consensus for review length? Is there a recommended length to stay with. I'd hate to bore people to tears. :)

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I thought it was very good. Look around, there are long reviews for products that aren't in the top 25.

 

Reading the reviews of what I'm drinking helps me pin point some of the subtle tastes/colors/mouthfeel/etc.

 

Being poetic or elegant is not one of my stronger points. For example:

 

Uh, it tastes good. :)

 

Yes, I'd buy it again.

 

The end

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Just out of curiosity though, I noticed that my review was about 7 times longer than others on the site. What is the general consensus for review length?

Depends on how many glasses I had while writing the review. ;)

I'm generally happy if I'm not embarrassed the next day. No, there's no reason at all for you to be embarrassed. :thumbup:

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Hmm... the strong alcoholic odeurs may mean that this is an absinthe that would benefit from extensive oxidation.

 

A wonderful review. The makers of the Roquette claim that it contains herbs that aren't available in any other brand of absinthe - after sipping it, do you have any idea what these might be?

 

I read that H. L. Pernod's original (1797) absinthe contained anise, fennel, hyssop, angelica, dittany, juniper, nutmeg and veronica. .

 

I don't think I've ever tried juniper, nutmeg or veronica in an absinthe, and as far as I know the Pernod Fils distillery at the end of the 19th century didn't use them either.

 

And I'm not sure what the word dittany means.

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Well, I've finished my bottle of 1797, and honestly I have to say I find it lacking compared the the Jades.

 

The aroma is excellent, but the louche is really, really weak. It took almost a 5:1 ratio before the louche was complete, and it looked very thin and oily. Mouth feel is creamy, just a little oily, and nicely coating. The flavor is very enjoyable, but simple.

 

Overall I find it a good but not excellent absinthe.

 

Maybe I got a bad bottle, maybe my palette just isn't tuned for this brand. Based on others reviews I was expecting something more. I may buy it again at some point for comparison purposes, but thats probably it. I'm glad to have tried it though.

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Major caveat: I have not tried this absinthe.

I am a little concerned about recent new absinthes needing a delicate hand in adding the water to the dose to achieve a nice louche. In my twisted and peabrained mind, absinthe is an anise and wormwood drink. A nice thick louche should not be an issue. I wonder why distillers want to create their absinthe with as little anise as possible? It is an anise drink for God's sake and good green anise is cheap and plentiful. Crank it up and give me a louche to rival a breve for mouth feel and thickness. Rich. Luxurious. Hedonistic as hell. Delicate? Sure, but never frail.

Oh

shit.

 

I

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m

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t

 

b

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t

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m

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t

o

 

g

o

 

t

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b

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d.

 

 

What a nice weekend......................................................

;)

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While T73 is savoring the St. George buttermilk-thickness louche, I'll take my sweet time doing a slow drip on Roquette tyvm :cheers:

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I (perhaps heretically) put a cube of ice in my absinthe after the louche every single time. I find it far more expedient and practical than dumping an entire tray of ice into the fountain just to have a drink or two (and I find it to be colder as well). I louche with room temperature water and can get it really really cold by simply adding the ice at the tail end of the louche. Anyway, when I add the ice the louche almost immediately becomes much more opaque, especially the Doubs and the 1797 brands, to the point where I cannot see the other side of the glass. I've figured the total ratio of water:absinthe that I typically use for either brand is about 3.5:1 including the ice, and they both end up nice and opaque like most other absinthes.

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Well, I've finished my bottle of 1797, and honestly I have to say I find it lacking compared the the Jades.

 

The aroma is excellent, but the louche is really, really weak. It took almost a 5:1 ratio before the louche was complete

You might find it so simple because it may be overwatered at 5:1.

 

 

I (perhaps heretically) put a cube of ice in my absinthe after the louche every single time. ... I louche with room temperature water and can get it really really cold by simply adding the ice at the tail end of the louche. ... when I add the ice the louche almost immediately becomes much more opaque,

Cold water produces a thicker louche in my experience. If you use cold water, you probably won't have to use the ice cube.

 

I find it far more expedient and practical than dumping an entire tray of ice into the fountain just to have a drink or two

Or you can get a broullier and add to it a glass of ice water.

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I keep my absinthe in the refrigerator, so it is cold. Not so cold that the anethol crystallizes, but cold. The water jug with filtered water is also kept in the fridge, so it is cold. The torsade glasses are in the freezer and I have enough that I can rotate them out and have cold ones for each glass. I use the fountain sometimes, but mostly, I use the broullier.

 

I grab a frozen glass and pour my two ounce dose. Drop a couple of cubes of ice in the broullier and set it on the glass and pour the water in. Everything I have drank so far has louched just fine this way. I plan to try the 1797, but if it won't louche with this method, it won't be a regular in my stock. I like my drinks COLD.

 

I do use room temperature absinthe and ice water when doing a review of any absinthe. However, I have yet to see any difference in the louche. In fact, I think it is better when everything is cold.

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Hey PC

 

This was an EXCELLENT review! In fact, I always have felt long copy works better than short copy, especially if it's written from the readers perspective, in this case folks who are eager to learn as much as we can about the different brands of Absinthe.

 

 

 

I very much intend to add a bottle of the Roquette to my next order from LDF

 

 

Thanks for the great review!

 

 

 

Peter

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T73,

 

I have to say I always enjoy your posts, what a great sense of humor you have, quite refereshing.

 

 

 

And I couldn't agree with you more ~ I adore Anise, the flavor, the aroma...everything about it. My key disapointment with the St George was the lack of a bolt of Anise flavor, maybe because he uses star anise, I'm not sure.

 

 

 

I've found the two Jades I have the 1901 and the Edouard to be exquisite in many ways, but then I love the readily available Lucid as well, despite it's cheesy as hell packaging. But hey, for 60 bucks?

 

 

 

It's a damn good stand in when my bank account screams and whimpers at $120 a bottle for the "Good Stuff"

 

 

Peter

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The Jades are very good but there are some mighty fine absinthes out there that are less expensive.

 

Check some out and be enlightened. Summer's coming and you may enjoy a lighter drink.

 

As for the Roquette 1797, I've only had one drink of the stuff but I enjoyed it. I like the mouthfeel and didn't mind the weak louche. I may try it again tonight and edit this. ;)

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While T73 is savoring the St. George buttermilk-thickness louche, I'll take my sweet time doing a slow drip on Roquette tyvm :cheers:

 

Any tasting between St. George, and Roquette will surely make the Roquette seem better than Edouard Pernod. ;)

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You might find it so simple because it may be overwatered at 5:1.

Exactly. I found the ratio 1:2.5 or 1:3 to be perfect for achieving the most possible louche that absinthe might achieve, of course using only very frozen water.

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I had a glass of Roquette 1797 last evening, and had a strange thing happen: during my slow drip (1 drop every 10 seconds or so) of icewater, which I did so as to try to coax a louche, I finally began to get a louche at around the 5 minute mark.

 

Here's where the weirdness kicks in: the louche didn't begin at the bottom, like a fog, nor at the top, like a descending fog. It happened in the middle of the glass, with a clearly delineated layer below and a thin one at top. I snapped a quick picture after the louche finished at the top:

133hrfYudjubjfvv21DJ3cKmo1_400.jpg

 

Has anyone else seen such a thing?

 

On the other hand, the Roquette was a stunning revelation. I loved the flavor, the aroma, and I can't wait for my bottle to arrive!

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I think the Roquette is a fabulous absinthe. To get a good louche, just use ice cold water and let it drip in at a normal rate...1 drop every 10 seconds is a lot slower than is necessary, in my opinion.

 

I don't seem to recall the louche forming the way yours did. Roquette's louche can be on the thin side, but the flavor and aroma more than compensate.

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I've spent a long time trying to coax a louche from some things only to get the water setting on bottom, under the lighter alcohol and oils. Then it seemed the louche would start in the middle. I have pix somewhere with clear water underneath and a thin layer of alcohol on top but I don't do it that slow anymore. It's neat looking but it messed with my ratio. When I thought it was right it would be to thin. I don't do thin very well.

 

I will agree with Marlow.

 

Nice pic though. Cheers!

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I think the Roquette is a fabulous absinthe. To get a good louche, just use ice cold water and let it drip in at a normal rate...

 

I think it's fabulous, as well, although I can't really say I ever coaxed a good louche out of it...perhaps adequate. The flavor is wondrous, however, so the delicate louche is quite easy to forgive.

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Yeah, it's a thin loucher amongst thin louchers.

 

and for said thinnies, I've actually used the ol' Gravy Spon to get the water underneath ala OMG, it works nicely if you let it sit for 5-10 min before dripping as usual. Just be mindful of the ratio thing, or do as I do and merely pour out a larger shot!

 

but louchewise, I'd say Roquette is some serious thinny-thin-thin, no way out of it. You'll only get so much no matter how you slice it.

 

I wouldn't call it wondrous, to me intriguing is a better word... :laugh:

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