Jump to content
Sean H

Reason for Slow Pouring?

Recommended Posts

Can anyone explain the reason for slowing adding water to absinthe? I'm sure I can understand why if you're using sugar, but what if you're not?

 

More specifically, I'm looking for the scientific reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't offer a scientific explanation, but I can say, when you dump water into absinthe quickly it does not seem to louche. I don't know why. Maybe fairies are perturbed by the hastiness of man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see OMG is replying as we speak, so I'm sure his answer will be spot on.

 

My two cents: Try it once by power louching (quick dumping in of water) and once with a slow, cold drip. Tell me you don't taste the difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Response from another non-scientist/real- artist:

The slow drip of ice cold water allows the essential oils to open up, adding to both taste and aroma. A really well-crafted absinthe doesn't need the very slow drip to louche although the louche will probably be stronger for it. The slow drip has a profound effect on the flavor and aroma but also contributes to the absinthe ritual. Watching the oil trails, the cold water and liquor swirl and blend is the history of absinthe in small: its beauty and trouble recreated again and again in every glass. 300 hundred years of history performing for you in every drink.

 

Or you can just dump the cold water in and knock it right back. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Study the louche

 

Become the louche

 

You are the louche

 

The louche is you

 

 

 

 

 

oooohhhhmmmmmm.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Louching has to do with the controlled mixture of water and oils, resulting in a colloidal suspension, similar to milk: fats suspended in water.

 

Doing it slowly—within reason—can make a difference, albeit a subtle one.

 

Try this:

 

Part 1. Put a half cup of vinegar in a big metal bowl. Then dump in a cup of olive oil. Then whisk the hell out of it for as long as you like.

 

Part 2. Put a half cup of vinegar in a big metal bowl. Then add a cup of olive oil very slowly‚—drizzling a tiny, thin stream of oil into the vinegar while whisking vigorously. *

 

Guess which one will be creamy and smooth and stay that way for months?

Guess which one will separate in a matter of seconds, no matter what you do?

 

*Use balsamic vinegar and add 1 tsp of basil, .25 tsp oregano, .25 tsp of rosemary, .25 tsp of fresh, coarse-ground black pepper, .5 tsp of sugar, .5 tsp salt for Hiram's Kickass Vinaigrette Salad Dressing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I imagine its something similar to getting yeast to work. I'll look it up for you.

I can't imagine that alcohol-soluble essential oils coming out of suspension as the water ratio increases has much of anything to do with microscopic organisms eating sugars. But I could be wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Watching the oil trails, the cold water and liquor swirl and blend is the history of absinthe in small: its beauty and trouble recreated again and again in every glass. 300 hundred years of history performing for you in every drink.

 

Absinthe: it's an aperitif, and it's a lava lamp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it might be something to do with a lot of the taste being in the aroma. A slow drip releases different aromas until the absinthe is louched, so the drinker is able to pick out the different aromas and tastes easily and as a result has a more complex drink.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Study the louche

 

Become the louche

 

You are the louche

 

The louche is you.

 

The Liver over at Louched Lounge already did that.

 

I think I'll pass. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, don't forget that half of the term "Slow Drip" is drip. One of the reasons those glass broilleurs are less than great is that they create a steady stream.

 

Even if a steady stream is so thin that it takes forever to fill the glass, it isn't as good as something that drips, because the action of individual drops slapping the surface of the drink creates agitation, the "roiling clouds" that make a full louche, as opposed to a smooth, seamless increase in the fluid level offered by the glass "dripper", which gives you a boring parfait-layered effect with less fullness in the final result.

 

The more you disturb the surface, the more you agitate the drink, the more the flavor is exposed. It's very much like swirling wine around in your glass to wake it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One of the reasons those glass broilleurs are less than great is that they create a steady stream.

 

A fountain, or mouthwash dispenser, dripping into a broilleur packed with crushed ice works very well. Slow drip, no splash-over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the reasons those glass broilleurs are less than great is that they create a steady stream.

 

A fountain, or mouthwash dispenser, dripping into a broilleur packed with crushed ice works very well. Slow drip, no splash-over.

 

A marble solves this dilemma.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One of the reasons those glass broilleurs are less than great is that they create a steady stream.

 

The answer to my prayers, thanks Wild Bill.

 

I'm sure old farts everywhere will concur. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to pour carefully from a carafe into my fountain, which then drips through a grille with sugar, on top of a glass brouilleur containing crushed ice. I time the process, and if the louche takes less than ten minutes, I consider it bruised and throw it out. Then I do a shot of Jäger and start over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll take a stab at this, but It is only my opinion.

 

If you add ice cold water slowly, drip by drip, then you are able to create a super saturated solution. The oils stay in solution much like a solution of sugar which was made by boiling sugar and water. You can shock crystals out of the sugar solution if you mechanically shock it.

 

Or even a putting a beer in the freezer for a while and taking it out when it is below 32F. It is a liquid unless you pop the cap, then all of a sudden you have a beer slushie.

 

If you add water rapidly you shock the oils out of solution.

 

If you use a slow drip, you never shock the solution. You create a super saturated solution and the oils stay in solution.

 

Try a slow drip and a rapid pour. Notice that the rapid pour has an oil slick on top and the slow drip does not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd rather put a keg of IPA outside when it is going down to 12F at night, and the next morning shake the keg and rack it to a second keg. This will leave behind about 30% of the water as ice. :devil:

 

Eis IPA! Weeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I time the process, and if the louche takes less than ten minutes, I consider it bruised and throw it out. Then I do a shot of Jäger and start over.

 

Gee whiz! Next you'll be saying that you chase the Jäger with a Bud Light! :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd rather put a keg of IPA outside when it is going down to 12F at night, and the next morning shake the keg and rack it to a second keg. This will leave behind about 30% of the water as ice. :devil:

 

Eis IPA! Weeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

 

You sir, get mad points. Now to move to a place where it snows...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All great answers! Thanks everyone for taking the time to reply. I'm going to take everyone's word instead of testing a glass with a fast pour. That would just be a waste! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, don't forget that half of the term "Slow Drip" is drip. One of the reasons those glass broilleurs are less than great is that they create a steady stream.

 

Which I suppose means.. Even if you're not using sugar, you should still use a spoon, as it helps break up the stream of water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×