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I know it's not smoking, but it's tobacco...


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#31 existone

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 08:52 AM

I just cant imagine how that wouldn't burn... Don't think I could bring myself to do it.
"A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on."

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#32 Bob

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 09:00 AM

It's actually very simple, once you learn not to sniff deeply and take the snuff into the throat. A bit of it on your thumbnail and hold it to your nostril and inhale normally, and it's done. The menthol and the lemon snuffs caused a bit more sneezing than the clove snuff, which didn't cause sneezing at all once I learned the trick. As I said, though, the effect was negligible, so I guess I might try a pipe or pipe-tobacco cigar next.

#33 Gwydion Stone

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 10:03 AM

This thread made me want a cigar, and I never smoke until evening.

About thirty-five years ago, there was a sugar-snuff that came in little tins. I think there was a variety of flavors, strawberry seems familiar. As I recall, the target audience was coke fiends, I guess. I just remember all my friends trying it and sneezing sugar-snot all over their shirt fronts. It was a great way to impress the young ladies. :twitchsmile:

I remember Cökesnuff. There were a few other brands too. I loved the little psychedelic, 70s-style tins it came in—oh wait, I guess it was the 70s. There were also tobacco snuffs too. My favorites were the vanilla Cökesnuff and a licorice tobacco snuff. Go figure. I used to like the licorice papers, too.

Only a Welshman! :laf:

Ahem. ;)

edit: look what I found:

Attached File  post_1_1202238358.jpg   37.41KB   0 downloads

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#34 OMG_Bill

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 11:10 AM

If I remember correctly, you didn't take the top off but twisted it to an opening. Those are the one's I had messed with. Briefly! ;)
Some folks may cringe each time I use the term "Booze" regarding these high quality drinks.
I mean no offense. There are bottles of extraordinary booze out there. I've tasted a few. Relax.

#35 Pan Buh

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 11:47 AM

Oh, shit, I remember those now. Yeah, they twisted to line up a hole where you could tap out a dose. Now how'd I know that?

#36 OMG_Bill

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 03:30 PM

I dunno.....perhaps the same way I did. I'm sure we read it somewhere. :)
Some folks may cringe each time I use the term "Booze" regarding these high quality drinks.
I mean no offense. There are bottles of extraordinary booze out there. I've tasted a few. Relax.

#37 baubel

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 05:03 PM

Patchouli? C'mon, who'd want to sniff that? I bet that was more like "Achoo-li".

A little technological fix to a spiritual problem.


#38 thetripscaptain

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 12:27 PM

Patchouli? C'mon, who'd want to sniff that? I bet that was more like "Achoo-li".


I was thinking along similar lines, except for all flavors. I can beat that on ridiculous cocaine-advertising products though:



;)
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#39 belewfripp

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 07:08 PM

Not snuff, but rather than start another tobacco-related but non-smoking thread in here, figured I'd just resurrect this one.

 

Anyone else use Swedish snus?  I smoked pretty regularly from the time I was 16 until about 4 years ago (some pipe/cigar smoking, but mostly cigarettes).  I knew it was awful for my health, so I eventually stopped, and wound up using Camel snus for a bit before discovering the real thing.  I have to say I love the range of flavors and the subtlety compared to the mainstream American products.  Additionally, the Swedish manufacturers voluntarily adhere to the WHO's recommendations on limits for dangerous substances in tobacco, and they are required by law to only use food-grade additives.

 

Unlike buying tobacco in this country, where who knows what's in it, I can look on the back of a can of General (or Göteburg or Jakobsson) and see everything that's in it.  Despite the safety precautions, it's still got nicotine, so you can't really say it's harmless, but I've come to enjoy it immensely.  Interestingly, despite the regulations and such regarding safety, in order to import it to the U.S. they have to slap stickers all over the cans with dire warnings (pretty sure the Swedish warning on the back only states that the product is addictive).  You can find some General brands in U.S. retail outlets, but they are pretty plain.  Lots more if you have it imported.

 

Probably the thing I like best, though, is that you can actually taste tobacco (as opposed to sand, fermented God-knows-what and the general vileness that are chew and dip).  The tobacco comes in little pouches, there's no need to spit and it's basically impossible for anyone to tell you have them in (under your top lip).  The fabric of the pouches is very non-irritating as well, so there's very little gum soreness.  Again, can't say it's harmless because of the nicotine, but as a harm reduction option that still lets you enjoy tobacco, I love the stuff.


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#40 Songcatcher

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 07:27 PM

Production method is the biggest difference. Swedish snus is steam pasteurized, opposed to American tobacco which is heat cured and fermented. It's also much weaker with very small amounts of nicotine, also something about how much nicotine is released over time compared to heat cured tobacco, I can't remember right off. I gave up all tobacco products a year ago May, I loved it too, but... fuck that shit.


The room it smelled heavy of drinkin',  
and the sad silent song made the hour twice as long,
as I waited for that sun to go sinkin'.

#41 belewfripp

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 05:39 AM

Yes, Swedish snus is air cured and steam pasteurized, specifically using a longer process that is below the temperature where TSNAs would form in great numbers, but still hot enough to pasteurize the tobacco over time.  They also conduct soil surveys to determine that tobacco they are using is not going to be high in heavy metals or other potentially dangerous items.

 

As for giving it up, congrats on that decision and for sticking to it - when I stopped smoking, initially the idea was no more tobacco at all, but I was too weak.  I've reconciled myself to the fact that I have an addictive personality, and will always want some kind of nicotine hit.  So, I use what I think is the least harmful product. and try to take care of my health otherwise.


"In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not subversive."   - Bill Watterson



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