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St. George in the NYT

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That handsome devil Gary Regan seems to attract the center of focus, no matter the subject in the foreground!

 

A certain anonymous island businessman of my acquaintance managed to talk another island businessman out of a tiny sample of an upcoming product.

 

Toted along some Marteau Verte to compare against this theoretical product.

 

Initial smells are similar. Theoretical product is perhaps a bit "greener" in the early herbs. Middle to late tastes are quite different. In those, the sharpness of the star anise of the theoretical product stands out in contrast to the mellower anise flavors of the Marteau. Should perhaps have brought VdF along to compare instead of the Marteau.

 

In any case, the theoretical product, despite its modern use of Star Anise, is indeed an Absinthe and quite a nicely distilled one, at that.

 

Also, both times I've been out to bars this weekend, the buzz around a certain green substance has been nearly palpable. The next year should prove to be quite interesting for Absinthe fanciers.

 

~Erik

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Theoretical product is perhaps a bit "greener"...

 

If only that were true...I fear that the absence of green anise, and some good old fashioned chlorophyll for coloring, St. George Absinthe will be a candidate for an old acquaintance's deer hunting slogan..."If it's brown, it's down". :thumbdown:

 

Of course, one could argue said about Belle Amie, but it's not brown, it's a luminous tree sap amber. :devil:

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I didn't mean "green" color, so much as "green" flavor. The Marteau is much more vibrant green in color than the St. George. St. George is pretty close to VdF in color.

 

What I meant was that the St. George has a bunch of complex herb (green) flavors in the early tastes that I can't quite place.

 

I am unclear as to whether they are using Star Anise in addition to or in substitution for Green Anise.

 

Isn't Green Anise pretty much required for any product which would hope to call itself Absinthe? I can't see how they could leave it completely out.

 

There are a bunch of Absinthe related happenings coming up in the San Francisco area. If I run into Mr. Winters at any of them I will be sure to ask.

 

~Erik

Edited by ejellest

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"Isn't Green Anise pretty much required for any product which would hope to call itself Absinthe? I can't see how they could leave it completely out."

 

 

 

It certainly should be, but as far as I know, star anise is being used instead of green anise...and, yes, I knew you were referring to the very young, rough flavor, but I couldn't resist the irony.

 

I've heard that Lance is usually known for sparing little expense on his quality products, but I think he's just missing the boat on this one...I imagine after the initial reactions come in, he'll probably wake up, and, hopefuuly, revamp the recipe.

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Have you tried some and had a change of heart since you posted this last Tuesday?

 

I'm on it like white on an albino a melanin-challenged individual, when it makes its debut.

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No, I still intend to purchase a bottle for reviewing purposes, anyway.

 

And who knows, even though I don't expect it to taste very traditionally absinthe-like, I may still enjoy its (most likely unique) flavor.

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No, I still intend to purchase a bottle for reviewing purposes, anyway.

 

And who knows, even though I don't expect it to taste very traditionally absinthe-like, I may still enjoy its (most likely unique) flavor.

 

 

Negative, negative, negative. :nono:

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Wow I can't wait until I move to San Fran in August to attend the Art Academy! Yet another plus of living in the Bay Area

 

 

What a coincidence. My little sister is moving to San Fran in May - and has a job interview to work....... at the Art Academy. She is really cute, BTW.

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Well, I haven't tasted the St George, and Absomphe hasn't either, and perhaps you have Zman. So feel free to comment when it's released. I look forward to seeing many reviews from the members here who'll have the chance to try it soon, after it's official release.

 

Without knowing the herb quantities of that list of ingredients, how can you say that the flavor won't be good, if you haven't tasted it?

 

And even if it's a bit different, is that in itself bad, undesirable?

 

It doesn't seem so to me, but I'm not very knowledgeable, and I haven't tasted anywhere near the number of absinthes A and Z have done, so I know my opinion doesn't count.

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I'm going to give it a shot before jumping to any conclusions, but it does list star anise and does not list green anise. I rarely like absinthes that are star anise-intensive.

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A guy came into the winery this evening, and he was talking about how he saw St. George Absinthe on the news. He had all sorts of questions about Absinthe, which I was happy to answer. Seems that word is getting around.

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I rarely like absinthes that are star anise-intensive.

 

I agree, Peridot, but in this case, I don't even know about "intensive" star anise.

 

A friend of a little birdie I know mentioned something about it tasting on the thin side, which would probably indicate a relatively low level of said ingredient.

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Didn't the New York Times article mention that he had never tried absinthe and knew next to nothing about it beyond an old Scientific American article that had included a recipe? If that is factually correct, an old Scientific American issue is floating about that has a peculiar and valid/invalid set of ingredients and directions for its absinthe's creation. So who's seen it? Anyone here?

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Not to be too obvious, but if you type in "scientific american absinthe" in Google, you find an article that originally appeared in 1989 by our favorite disinformation "expert" Dr. Arnold. I'm not sure if the article is reprinted in the current edition or just on their website.

Edited by Marcel

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No shit. Tell me more about this "google" thing.

 

I kid. In fact, I'm a bit red in the face here, having brought my inquiry before the WS panel before consulting the almighty GOOGLE. Seriously, I just didn't expect an engine like Google to provide any answers. Shows what I know; I should be punished by their algorithm:

 

MCP.jpg

 

Thanks. I'll be checking out that search result now.

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The article barely makes any mention of what ingredients go in absinthe; that small part that does mention how absinthe is made gets almost everything completely wrong.The article also makes no mention of some of the odd ingredients chosen for St. George, including basil and stinging nettles, if I remember correctly. I don't think a quick Google search has proved to be sufficient in this case.

 

The point is that the article that led to St. George absinthe is not this one. This one has no recipe and mentions none of the herbs we know to be used in St. George absinthe. Besides, this particular article is about as well-informed as we could expect an article written in 1989 to be.

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Still no mention of star anise, basil, stinging nettle etc.

 

I think the basil and stinging nettle thing might be more an inspiration derived from local ingredients inspired by Alice Waters etc.

Edited by Marcel

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I believe Mr. Winters is quiet often inspired by his locale. I've got an issue of MAKE Magazine(#11, if your interested) with an article about him and Hangar One which states he's working on a gin that he wants to smell "like Redwood Regional Park in the East Bay hills." And also a rum made from local sugarcane juice.

 

Either one is gonna be fun if they ever make it to full scale retail production.

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A friend of a little birdie I know mentioned something about it tasting on the thin side, which would probably indicate a relatively low level of said ingredient.

Huh. Maybe. I've honestly never to my knowledge had an absinthe with only star anise that wasn't over-anised so maybe it's not so bad. I just tend to not really care for the tangy taste of it at all so to me it would certainly do well to be relatively low-anise in proportion to the other ingredients.

 

I suppose I'd best shut up until I've tasted it. Which I would like to do as soon as possible, except I don't live on the west coast.

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I'm really interested to try this as well, but I'm sure you'll get your chance well before me.

 

There was a short video clip on this absinthe that somebody somewhere linked to recently. A glass was louched during the presentation, but the camera wasn't focusing on it. I thought the louche seemed quite quick (well, it was a big splosh from a carafe) and milky thick from what I could see. I thought it confirmed my suspicions, but now the rumor here is that it's thin. Whatever the truth turns out to be, and however much badiane is in the recipe, I have a hypothesis that one of the other herbs does a lot to take the rough edges off the badiane. I'm more circumspect about the positive contribution this herb makes to the overall flavor profile, though. Of course, the proof will ultimate be in the taste.

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I await further more educated tastes trying this Absinthe.

 

It did louche quickly and was a quite thick, pretty opaque.

 

Here is it in an Earthquake (Yes, I felt bad about using it in that cocktail, but I am on "E" and what can I do?) and you can see it being swirled in the background.

 

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edit - remove quote from previous post.

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And here it is in an E. Nos Cocktail:

 

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E. Nos Cocktail

 

1/3 French Vermouth. (Noilly Prat Dry)

2/3 Nicholson's Gin. (Anchor Junipero and dash of simple)

3 Dashes of Absinthe. (St. George Spirits Absinthe)

 

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

 

In my experience it's pretty unusual to be able to see that much of a louche with as little absinthe as is being used in this cocktail.

 

This is an excellent cocktail, by the way. The Earthquake is not.

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