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Belle Amie

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Deluge tried it when he was in Pontarlier, and said that it was delicious...he's a guy who's tried quite a number of pre-ban absinthes, and I trust his palate, so I just ordered three.

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Well, I just ordered a bottle of Belle Ami and a bottle of the new rouge which I'm looking forward to.

 

Last month I tried the Mansinthe, the Marteau, the Angelique, and the 1797. All very good.

I did find that the 1797 does not have much of a louche. The Marteau is very very good. The Angelique I find to be different, but very good as well.

 

As you can see there isn't much I don't like. Maybe because of an untrained palate, I don't know.

 

I'm sure I'll enjoy the Belle Ami and La Maitresse.

Thanks,

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If you use very cold water, and try about a ten minute drip, you'll find the 1797 louche is quite decent, if not exactly creamy. I find, with all that herbaceousness, the flavor is quite mouth-coating, and I wonder if a thick louche might have almost been overkill, in this partcular case.

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Really.

 

Afterwards, I dispense with the ice cube, and just stick it in the freezer for about 15-20 minutes... lo and behold, it's at the perfect drinking temperature.

 

Of course, once or twice, I kinda forgot about my nectar-filled glass until the following day...hey, when life hands you frozen absinthe, make absinthe popsicles! :twitchsmile:

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Right you are, M.

 

A few minutes in the freezer has the same chilling effect, but actually seems to thicken the louche, rather than thinning out the drink.

 

Besides, I don't want some hard floating thing interfering with the velvety- textured pleasure of my absinthe. :devil:

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You buy them books, and they eat the covers. :dry:

 

You want your absinthe cold Frappé it. There is a historical precedent.

HerbsaintFrappe.jpg

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That calls for two ounces of Herbsaint and two ounces of water. Seems a bit thick. I like the method, though.

 

 

The old stuff 1954 100 proof version wasn't as heavy handed as the current incarnation, I'd tweak the recipe per individual taste.

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I like the taste of the 1797 but it has a very thin mouth feel and weak louche even with a long slow drip.

 

I echo these sentiments. I put a squeeze bottle full of spring water in the freezer until most of it was frozen. And I also crushed ice and put it over the marble in my dripper, had one of those nice long 10 min. drips. The louche was certainly thicker than before but still rather weak. And it thinned out very quickly.

 

Delicious stuff though.

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And that's the bottomline for me...not every absinthe needs a thick, creamy louche. I really think the Roquette would be overbearing if it were that mouthcoating, since the flavor is quite powerful to begin with, and some of the subtler flavor nuances might be lost.

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I disagree... to my understanding Roquette was made as an absinthe and a high quality one at that.

 

Not that I know anything, but I think the taste of the Roquette with a full mouth feel would have been outstanding.

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Don't forget what the roots of the original drink are. My point was that the original recipe is from the era of the birth of the absinthe, which was originally served as a tonic or at least a beverage with medicinal properties. It indeed is an absinthe of the utmost quality, but it is also one that is reproducing one of the very early recipes.

 

The Roquette 1797 is a complex, unusual and spicy absinthe, based directly on a late 18th century manuscript recipe. It represents the first serious attempt in the modern era to recreate an absinthe from the very birth of La Fee Verte, when the drink straddled the line between liquor and potion, when it was as much magical and mysterious elixir as fashionable aperitif.

 

From the original 1797 release:

It is more herbaceous and slightly medicinal, as it was most likely originally intended, yet quite tasty, and it has a louche that is more of a light, opaque olive green instead of milky white. This may have been what absinthe was like before the Pernod son went main-stream and is certainly an interesting historical experiment.

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You buy them books, and they eat the covers. :dry:

 

You want your absinthe cold Frappé it. There is a historical precedent.

Hmm not a good example TGI.

It was not something they were doing during the Belle Epoque, simply because the ice was often made from unclean water and was rarely mixed with anything else.

See that beautiful 6 spigots fountain specially made so that the ice does not mix with clean water:

 

post-727-1196241109_thumb.jpg

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Look carefully, the fountain has a similar glass bubble chamber suspended within the larger water reservoir. Looks like a fabulous fountain.

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Hmm not a good example TGI.

It was not something they were doing during the Belle Epoque, simply because the ice was often made from unclean water and was rarely mixed with anything else.

 

Wrong country.

Actually it was done over here in America back in the day, iced drinks were more popular over in the United Sates than in France, especially in a hot climate like New Orleans where absinthe was popular.

 

A number of vintage American cocktail books mention the use of a glass brouille in preparing absinthe, (usually called drippers) which facilitated the use of ice as well, and were likely the inspiration for Legendre offering these babies post prohibition. For only a dollar and fifty cents

 

HerbsaintDripGlass.jpg HerbsaintDripGlass1.jpg

 

And there was that popular song written in 1904 by Victor Herbert, Absinthe Frappé which was inspired by what drink? ;)

 

 

That is a beautiful set up. :cheers: I wish there were more actual American absinthe antiques that originated here.

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Yep. Behold the Obituary:

 

obit.jpg

 

This is why I try to bridge the gap between the "absinthe community" and the "cocktail community." There are tons of perfectly good and historically authentic absinthe cocktails. The cocktails in the pre-pro section all date from before the ban, since the absinthe ban pre-dated prohibition here by eight years. There are many more to come that still need to be formatted for the site.

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Kewel, never seen one like that before.

No, that is kewel:

 

L1000711MS2.jpg

 

L1000713MS2.jpg

 

My dream :dribble:

 

For sale at $4500 only.

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You buy them books, and they eat the covers. :dry:

 

You want your absinthe cold Frappé it. There is a historical precedent.

Hmm not a good example TGI.

It was not something they were doing during the Belle Epoque, simply because the ice was often made from unclean water and was rarely mixed with anything else.

See that beautiful 6 spigots fountain specially made so that the ice does not mix with clean water:

 

post-727-1196241109_thumb.jpg

Now thats a tasty looking fountain

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