Jump to content
zobop

Is 1.5 oz. the typical drink amount?

Recommended Posts

Hello again people.

 

Do most of you actually measure your absinthe before putting it in your drinking glass?

Or do you just free-pour an estimated amount?

 

Do you use 1.5 oz as a standard absinthe measurement before louching?

 

Wondering if it is a waste of time using a 1.5 oz shot glass to measure.

I guess you could lick the shot glass each time so you don't waste any. :)

 

Also wondering if anybody uses a larger amount of absinthe to start with.

Maybe 2.0 oz or 2.5 oz?

 

I have seen some nice 2 oz shot glasses for sale. They are 2-7/8" tall.

I have also seen some nice 3 oz shooter glasses.

 

I suppose once you have measured 1.5 oz or 2.0 oz into your glass, you can

pretty much remember where the level is and free pour from that time on?

 

Thank you.

Edited by zobop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope.

Just pour.

 

Nope.

 

It is for me.

 

Sometimes.

 

Your last observation is what I do. I use the same glass almost all the time and have two sizes, each of which I've grown accustomed to where the levels for pre/post louche should be for my tastes.

 

But remember, the margin of error can sometimes be the fun part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also wondering if anybody uses a larger amount of absinthe to start with.

Maybe 2.0 oz or 2.5 oz?

 

I've been known to top 3oz.

 

Some people call it crazy, others call it Absomphesizing.

 

Of course, when I do that, it's always in a larger glass. Under watering is almost as much of a travesty as over watering. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on the glass you use, if you have a nice Cordon one with reservoir you know exactly how much absinthe is to be poured there. You are free to pour in from 10ml-50ml I believe, depending on the glass and personal taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a 2oz shot glass and sometimes a measuring cup,2to1 is 4oz of water and 3to1 is 6oz of water. You can also just pour until the Absinthe is louched. Which means there is no clear absinthe, not any floating on top. I use a brouilleur with crushed and cubed ice. :cheers:

 

P.S. Put the measuring cup in a ziplock bag and put it in the freezer. That way the water will stay as cold as it started.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest, not being a longtime cocktail-mixer like so many here on the WS, I tend to think in terms of centilitres, the language of absinthe culture. (before absinthe, my drinking was pretty much limited to pouring various whiskies unmeasured over ice, or ordering cocktails in bars)

 

The classic, or historic quantity was 3cl, which is exactly one oz. This comes from antique absinthe glasses, however, which were made for commercial bistros, who had an interest in making the drinks smaller than you might at home. The defacto standard absinthe glass in the modern world, the Pontarlier glass, has a reservoir that holds 4cl, because there is no bistro service of absinthe today, so the modern glasses are made with home-drinkers in mind. (no, Absomphe, I don't mean people who drink their homes)

 

There is a slight advantage to making smaller drinks, which is that they're likely to stay cold. If your drink is too big, and you stand around nursing it for a while, it warms up in your hand. Better to make three small ones that stay cold than a jug-size drink that finishes off lukewarm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's hard on the knees.

You can also just pour until the Absinthe is louched. Which means there is no clear absinthe, not any floating on top.
I'm not sure exactly where this method got started, but it's not terribly reliable in my experience. It's largely a function of the difference in temperatures of the two liquids. Another misconception I've seen numerous times (I'm not saying that you said this, Willy) is that the clear liquid at the top is the oils floating. It's just the warmer and undiluted absinthe.

 

This is related to the other common misconception that bugs me: those wavy lines you see in the absinthe when you first add water are not oils either. It's the two liquids—water and absinthe—not quite mixing yet. You can get the same effect with hot water and cold water. Or hot air and cold air for that matter. Fluids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the "clear line" got started from Ted giving a demonstration in the Thirsty Traveler show, but I'm not sure.

 

With calm pouring the clear line can easily stick around past 5:1 or can vanish before 3:1 with turbulent pouring.

 

Oh and I normally go with 1oz servings repeating when needed. It annoys me when a giant glass gets warm before the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What Elf said. Pour, drink, ask yerself "was it good?". If yes, try to repeat the same way, if no, pour some more water or some more booze or skip the sugar or add the sugar or whatever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You can also just pour until the Absinthe is louched. Which means there is no clear absinthe, not any floating on top.
I'm not sure exactly where this method got started, but it's not terribly reliable in my experience.

 

The history channel had a show on Absinthe, featuring Ted and the Combier Distillery.At the end of the show, Ted gave a demonstration in the proper way to prepare Absinthe. He used a brouilleur with ice and he added water until the louche was complete, and then stated that once it is cloudy from bottom to top,the Absinthe is ready to drink. I also noticed that a lot of antique glasses may have dose marks but no water marks, this also holds true for reproductions. In pictures and posters from the Belle Epoque era they use a carafe to pour water it their drink either over a spoon containing a sugar cube or just pouring directly into the glass with no visible means of measuring except for the louche. Even in the famous Pontarlier poster the louche goes beyond the etching on the glass.

 

But for me, I got the idea when I used a measuring cup and noticed that if it was 2:1 or 3:1 it finished at a complete louche (no clear line) and no more. This indicated to me that this the base from which you decide if you need to add sugar or more water. I found that the clear line meant it was under watered and that gave the drink a raw unpleasant taste.

 

Well Hiram, I hope this helps, but if not, please let me known

:cheers:

TR. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw the show too, I've just never seen or read anything that indicated it was a "proper" method or that it had ever been around before then. I'm pretty sure Ted was just suggesting it off the cuff as a rule of thumb kind of thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My drinks are poured according to my mood for the evening. Of course it improves with absinthe. ;)

 

If I plan on sampling I may use 15ml, about a half ounce. If I'm planning on sitting and visiting or just drinking from one bottle, I may make it a larger dose.

 

I louche to suit me. Some days I like it a little on the strong side but rarely do I want it over watered. A thin tasting drink isn't for me. You can always add water, it's taking it out that presents the problem.

 

The fun is in the experimenting. Shoot.....go nutz! I do and it ain't a long trip.

 

:cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:cheers: It seems to me that the Absinthe glasses evolved so the proprietor could keep a better track of his costs and I surmize that he had a clear idea of how much product he had on hand and what his profits would be if he kept to a system of tracking his outpourings :laugh: . The Victorian era was of such grandious style that is was incorporated into the glasses just like a shot glass in the west and even today. IMHO So today it really doesn't matter how much you pour into your glass, just how much it takes to get your groove going. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

T.R., maybe his brand is ready to drink at that point, but many others may not be. At the same time, ready to drink, and suitably diluted for the specific individual are totally different things. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My drinks are poured according to my mood for the evening.

I louche to suit me. Some days I like it a little on the strong side but rarely do I want it over watered.

Exactly. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My apologies for not responding sooner

 

I found the History channel program click HERE,then click T.A. Breaux on the history channel,then fast forward the video to 9:07 and judge for yourself.

 

:cheers: to all

TR.

 

P.S. Hey Shabba

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. As mentioned, everyone likes their drink a different strength. There's nothing wrong with a bit more or a bit less water. Just like there's nothing wrong with sugaring or not sugaring your tipple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
With calm pouring the clear line can easily stick around past 5:1 or can vanish before 3:1 with turbulent pouring.

And this too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've seen it before. I don't agree with it.

Thats fine,but Ted with his credentials does validate the technique. As to the fine line of absinthe,I use a brouilleur and have never had any difficulty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thats fine,but Ted with his credentials does validate the technique.

You're right. Ted knows best how my drink should taste. I'll do it that way from now on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×