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Which Would You Choose To Legalize?

Which Would You Choose To Legalize in the US?  

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Sqertz, I thought home distillation was already legal in Sweden?

 

Nope, and Sqertz is in Denmark, by the way.

 

Home distilling used to be huuuuge in Sweden though. Lots of people distilling thousands of liters, selling to the general public like nothing really mattered.

 

Now, since the importation levels have been raised and the prices are so damned low in say Germany, Denmark and maybe Finland, people travel there instead, to buy booze. That has more or less erased home distillers from at least southern Sweden. Buying vodka in Germany costs less than buying home distilled "vodka".

 

So, home distilling is not legal in Sweden, no.

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As for the question: I'd opt for #1, commercial, import, etc...

 

The purists are always going to support the specialty producers. In my limited exposure so far, it is clear there is already a wide variety in the flavors/quality/appeal in the commercial, albeit illegal, absinthe. I doubt a flood of cheap, commercial absinthe would turn anyone here into the equivalent of "Joe 6-pack".

 

Is there any reason to believe that the marketplace would be flooded with bulk absinthe? Even so, would the boutique producers give up? Should we expect the Suisse Clandestines (for example) to disappear now that production is legal in Switzerland?

 

Perhaps neither is best. Maintain the scarcity. The mystique. Probably keeps the Darwin-awardees at bay.

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British Columbia isn't exactly flooded with bad absinthe (I won't say cheap absinthe because many bad absinthe brands ain't cheap). About a year ago, only Hills, Absente and some other Czech brands were in liquor stores. Most bars didn't have any, and if they did it was Hills.

 

I'm going back next month and I'll report if anything has changed.

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British Columbia isn't exactly flooded with bad absinthe (I won't say cheap absinthe because many bad absinthe brands ain't cheap).  About a year ago, only Hills, Absente and some other Czech brands were in liquor stores.  Most bars didn't have any, and if they did it was Hills. 

 

I'm going back next month and I'll report if anything has changed.

 

 

nope still hasn't changed

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British Columbia isn't exactly flooded with bad absinthe (I won't say cheap absinthe because many bad absinthe brands ain't cheap).  About a year ago, only Hills, Absente and some other Czech brands were in liquor stores.  Most bars didn't have any, and if they did it was Hills. 

 

I'm going back next month and I'll report if anything has changed.

 

 

nope still hasn't changed

 

You could just ask me, I live in B.C. (The other available brand is Green Tree Distillery, which is worse, yes actually worse, than Hills).

 

I can say, with a great deal of confidence, that that will probably never change.

 

During my last shipment which was stopped at Customs, (I just received it 2 days ago after much working of the phones, the downside of legalized anything is the wicked bureaucracy), I had an argument with a person at our Government Liquor Distribution Branch in which she claimed that Absinthe and wormwood was banned in Canadia and how all the original stuff was made you Trip Balz®, so to speak, and this was my problem with customs.

 

I encounter this idea a lot. Most Canadians, and this includes people who should know, don't know that it isn't illegal here and in some ways are even vehemently opposed to the idea because of what they think they know about it. I have heard such weird stories and assumptions. This may be a good idea for a thread, too.

 

I have spoken to the Branch about getting other brands, but, I get the same kind of misinformed fear from most people there. I would have to launch a whole re-education campaign just to convince the right people to try something else, where there is also very little demand so not worth it to them.

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I had to go with distillation. If the sale of it was legalized there would be way too many idiots out there who never learn much about it, and buy it just to "trip balz". I think it would take away from the quality and enjoyment of the ritual itself.

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Fully automatic weapons, i.e., Class Three, are legal as long as you go through the licensing procedure and agree to the various terms and conditions. There is a gun range near me that rents out a variety of "machine guns" by the hour for use on the range as long as you first take a safety course (and buy the ammunition).

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Ah yes, I forgot that Clinton's ban was never fully fixed into place, and even that did'nt cover all fully automatic weapons. I got to fire an M-16 when I was 12. I'll never forget it. I could go political here, but I wish to avoid the cornfield.

 

On topic, I voted for legal home distillation. It would mean more choice, better quality, and no corporate infulence or control(sorry feds, not!). I am sure companies would build home stills that were easy to use and had safe-guards that would be sold at the local Wal-Mart. Dream on...

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I voted for legalized absinthe. I mean, we could argue that neither ban really has that much practical effect right now - if you want absinthe you get it over the Interweb, if you want H-G you just keep your mouth shut about it.

 

But I think option A would have a more immediate positive effect for the absinthe drinker, in terms of bulk distribution and lower prices. I personally wouldn't mind seeing absinthe demystified; myths about alcohol and other substances get in the way of understanding them, as we've seen with the much-fabled thujone.

 

On the other hand, perhaps legalizing home distillation would lead to the end of the absinthe ban anyway, since the government couldn't control what you put into your still. If people could openly produce and share their homemade goods, and it created enough of a buzz, the commercial distillers might want a piece of that action.

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I am sure companies would build home stills that were easy to use...

I'm sure you're right.

Eh, stainless isn't the way I'd go with a still. Poor heat-transfer characteristics.

 

If you want to do it right, you need a good copper still. Particularly this baby right here. But that'll cost you a lot more. :D

 

warning, links have LOUD embedded .wavs.

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I posted the link to Mile-hi as a joke. I just wanted to point out that people were already selling stills in the US. The moonshine stills are as much of a joke, unless you want to make moonshine.

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I going waaaay out on a limb here, but isn't that only for distilling H2O? If you're joking then nevermind(Grim, that is)

I already know Hiram was joking ;)

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No, a German company sells a modified version that heats up to the right temp for distilling alcohol. Still it's not right for absinthe though (pun intended). Absinthe producers in Europe use a copper alembic still typically.

 

I vote for the importation rather than distilling. Theoretically of course, making absinthe yourself using historical ingredients and equipment is too expensive. The cost for the wine spirits alone could equal that of a bottle of high quality absinthe (including shipping). If its good absinthe you're after, importation is the best option.

 

 

I going waaaay out on a limb here, but isn't that only for distilling H2O? If you're joking then nevermind(Grim, that is)

I already know Hiram was joking ;)

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No, a German company sells a modified version that heats up to the right temp for distilling alcohol.  Still it's not right for absinthe though (pun intended).  Absinthe producers in Europe use a copper alembic still typically.

 

I vote for the importation rather than distilling.  Theoretically of course, making absinthe yourself using historical ingredients and equipment is too expensive.  The cost for the wine spirits alone could equal that of a bottle of high quality absinthe (including shipping).  If its good absinthe you're after, importation is the best option.

 

Actually, alcohol has a lower boiling point than water, so any water still can theoretically distill alcohol as well. Probably not the way you want to go for making good absinthe, though (and it's still just as illegal).

 

As far as cost in making your own, don't forget that with a few pounds of grapes and some yeast, you could make your own wine base if home distillation were legal. And I've had some HG made on this side of the pond that tastes more like preban absinthe than any of the Jades.

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