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Which Would You Choose To Legalize?

Which Would You Choose To Legalize in the US?  

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If you could only choose one, which would you choose? Give a good deal of thought to the long-term effects your answer.

 

 

*This refers to all distillation—whisky, vodka, rum, gin, etc., not just absinthe.

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I voted for legalized sale/importation of absinthe. I'm assuming that home distillation laws won't be enforced any more strictly than they are now, which as far as I can tell is "don't ask don't tell," unless you live in Kentucky and make 1000 gallon batches of whiskey in barns hidden in the woods.

 

Legalized home distillation (assuming no added provision to keep home absinthe illegal) will help some people sleep better at night, I don't think it will improve the availability of absinthe that much.

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That's right.

I even had a cop tell me that when I had witnessed some jackass pulling a brain dead move that caused an accident.

 

He got away and the three cars in front of me played bumper cars.

We all explained how the other guy had caused the accident.

The cop said, "I understand, but there is no law against being stupid."

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I voted for the legalization of home distillation.

Mostly because I'm sure that would lead to a lot of stupid people killing themselves in any number of creative ways.

 

I'm looking beyond my own needs and toward the future of humanity.

 

My selflessness knows no bounds.

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I don't think it would be nearly as much fun if they legalized either one of them. The large corps would take over production and we would probably switch to beer.

As the great Aardvark PooBah said many years ago (and I quote) "When Absinthe is in-lawed - only our in-laws will have Absinthe" :no: It would be a sad day.

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I voted for the legalization of home distillation.

Mostly because I'm sure that would lead to a lot of stupid people killing themselves in any number of creative ways.

 

I'm looking beyond my own needs and toward the future of humanity.

 

My selflessness knows no bounds.

 

 

I like the way you think.

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Definitely legalization of home distillation of absinthe.

 

It would probably eventually lead to microdistilleries, in the same way that legalizing homebrewing, and winemaking has led to the establishment of those micros...

 

Which, for the most part, produce better, and more interesting products, than their macro counterparts.

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Note that it says nothing about home distillation of absinthe - just home distillation. The choice is between legal commercial absinthe or legal distilling. Either way, it's a two-edged sword.

 

Legalizing commercial absinthe would put it within reach of everyone who wanted it, at the cost of opening the market to the big American distilleries (and ad agencies) who would undoubtedly make an absolute mockery of it and cater to the shot-shooting college crowd. There would of course be high-end absinthes produced by craft distilleries as well. Our friends in the absinthe business would be able to distribute here - Jade, Kübler and François Guy, together on the shelf at the liquor store right next to the Akvavit, Arak and Ouzo - and La Fée Bohemian. They wouldn't cost quite as much as they do now.

 

Legalizing home distillation would simply make it legal to make liquors for family use. Just as you can put anything you want in your own beer or wine, there wouldn't be anything to prevent one from making absinthe. As we know, a smaller craft movement can set the benchmark for the commercial market. We saw this happen with microbreweries, as Absomphe pointed out. The foreign commercial market would benefit from a huge amateur base doing all the R & D, just as with mircobrews. Home-made absinthe would be as available as homebrew beer is now. Everyone knows at least one home-brewer. Of course, "absinthe kit" sales and all the attendant marketing would also skyrocket. Even with all the popularity, legal distilling wouldn't disrupt the huge liquor industry (and taxes collected), any more than people who make their own clothes disrupt the fashion industry.

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I'm going for home distillation as well although I was tempted to say neither. Although I would certainly like the cost of my favorite Absinthes to come down, I do not want the demystification of Absinthe that over popularity would bring.

 

If home distillation were legal we would see some really creative stuff and while 98% of folks were crafting whisky and gin, I might get to taste some really great HG. Better yet, I might try it myself.

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I'm with home distilling too. I'd rather be able to create liquor on my own than have easy access to other peoples'. I don't quite understand the reasoning behind distillation laws either. Any schmuck who's over 21 can create their own alcohol, but you have to have commercial property to legally boil the alcohol out? Doesn't make much sense to me, but I might be missing something there.

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I would choose legalization of absinthe.

 

 

Reasons why.

I'm selfish. Slightly cheaper quality absinthe and less worries of kustoms sounds good to me. Of course it would open the flood gates to all kinds of crap products and claims but it's not like we don't get that already. The fact that college students beer bong piss water beer doesn't effect a beerists ability to savour a quality product.

I also don't think it would demystify absinthe for anyone that cared. Is it's legality in the US really a large part of the romance involved? I know many see it as a form of civil disobedience, but if so, why would the legalization and repeal of stupid laws be considered a bad thing?

 

In short, legalization would give me slightly cheaper bottles, and although spurring crap, may actually lessen some of the stupid claims we hear, as it will no longer be "cool" or "special" for people like Manson to say he drinks absinthe, or that an actor got drunk off absinth in a recent trip to prague. Those in the know can still enjoy it's long history, and great taste. Hmm, that wasn't short.

 

Reasons for not choosing home distillation.

I would choose both if that was an option. Since it isn't, the distillation of absinthe would still be considered illegal, and although it would create an american clandestine, I doubt it would lead to anything more than small HGs.

 

 

The legalization of home distillation does hold more possibilities, but to be absinthe minded (bah, stupid pun people) and selfish, just not enough for me to choose it over legalization of absinthe. Of course, maybe I'm not in the know of exactly what's out there if home distillation was legalized and american clandestine was available.

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the distillation of absinthe would still be considered illegal
Actually, no it wouldn't. The current prohibitions are on commercial production and sale. If distillation were legal, making real absinthe at home would be as legal as making steepsinthe.

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Yes, you're right.

I ment to say that the sale of distilled absinthe would still be considered illegal, since wouldn't it fall under the same rules that prevent the sale of absinthe currently?

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Definitely legalization of home distillation of abinthe.

 

It would probably eventually lead to microdistilleries.

 

This is already happening.

There's a distiller on Nantucket making vodka, whiskey and "scotch" (they call it Notch, ugh.... )

Nashoba Valley winery is making their own grappas, brandies, vodka, and they just put some whiskey in barrels to age.

Dogfish Head has a distillery.

Anchor brewery makes an amazing gin (Junipero) and a whiskey I've yet to try.

I've read of a couple other small distillers in the NW, but I can't recall their names.

I'm sure there's others and that there will be more. Home distilling may speed it up but it's already happening.

I voted for legalizing absinthe for the reasons GreenGenes stated.

Also, I think, no matter what the product is (beer, wine, booze) there will always be the large, brain-dead market that mass producers will market too.

By being legalized, quality, small-scale producers will spring up and the present micro-distillers would be able to try their hand at it, because, as with the mass-market demand, there will be (and is) a market for artisnal products.

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Also, I think, no matter what the product is (beer, wine, booze) there will always be the large, brain-dead market that mass producers will market too.

 

 

I find that a general correlation exists between the average I.Q. of 100, and piss poor aesthetic taste...most people seem to prefer a product which is mundane at best.

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I find that a general correlation exists between the average I.Q. of 100, and piss poor aesthetic taste...most people seem to prefer a product which is mundane at best.

 

I tend to concur with this. I've noticed that people tend to like not having to think about something to "enjoy" it. Anything particularly complex or idiosyncratic, to the point that some level of lucidity is necessary to fully appreciate it, seems to turn some people off.

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I doubt there's enough demand for absinthe in the U.S, or anywhere for the "big terrible money sucking capitalist corporations" to "take over" any production. Legalizing it would enhance the possibilities to actually get your hands on the good stuff, maybe without paying out of your ass to bring it to your table.

 

I know, you'd see a load of Hill's and other crapsinth on the market, but hey - it's the same thing with any type of spirits. Bourbon, whiskey, cognac - you name it. There's a shitty wannabe worthless no-good brand for everything.

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The mediocrity is always the most popular; it's the safest choice and the least challenging. It's the thing that displeases the majority less than any other; and is therefore never truly brilliant.

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As for the effects of a legalization: take a look at just any other country than the US. It could be like Sweden, where only crap is available, like Denmark, where lots of crap and Segarra 45 is available, like UK, where shitloads of czech crap and also the LdF products are available, like France, where there's some crap, a lot of mediocrity and a few quality products in at least one shop ...

 

Quality products will be there if 1) there is a demand and 2) some dealers can be convinced of 1). Here, most people dislike anise, but fourteen year old kids will drink anything, if it gets them drunk and some rapper made a hit about it; so, Hapsburg everywhere. In France, they've forgotten everything about absinthe, but they do appreciate a good anise bomb; so, F. Guy on the shelves, at least in the town where it is made.

 

As absinthe is already legal here ... can I vote for home distillation and get both? ;)

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I tend to agree with Ari's manifesto. Very well thought out and practical.

 

I was going to say "and that's my 2 cents worth on the subject". But it's really Ari's investment of pennies.

 

I'm just agreeing.

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While I personally would like to see home crafting legalized, I just don't see it happening anytime soon. (Picture how complicated Big Brother would make it)

 

I think we would be better served with legalized commercial production of absinthe, the bad stuff will always be ignored by the serious consumers, and a more reasonable price point could be realized for decent commercial product.

 

Since there are always boutique commercial outlets for alcohol products, a very savvy and talented individual could very well make a deal with a small distiller, to bring a some unique high end absinthes to the market for the connoisseurs.

 

Unfortunately without an interested party with deep pockets, (Or a group of distillers willing to spend the money) getting the reg's changed isn't going to happen, until someone sees some profit potential for the amount of money spent.

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Does anyone know how legalization came about in Switzerland?

 

Easy. The Swiss saw all the money being made by the frogs, czechs, krauts, and spanish and knew that there was alot of clandestine absinthe being made in them thar Swiss hills. The gubmint makes it legal, bingo, now it's legal and TAXABLE.

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