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AlyssaDyane

Kübler UPDATE!

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Auguru, How early in the morning do you call your monkey distribution center? I understand that my Mocha Monkeys load their trucks in the middle of the night, far earlier that I'm likely to arise. Maybe I could even call them the evening prior to the expected delivery to have it held?

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I usually verify the night before (actually early morning, same day) online that the package is at the center. I then call between 6 and 7 AM to request they hold the package (or pull it off the truck). I've called as late as 8 AM successfully, but think your chances are better earlier. The main thing is to have the tracking number at hand to relay to the folks at the distribution center. I've had at least half a dozen pick ups succeed in the last year (all that I've tried to have held anyway). Much preferred over missing the drop-off and the agony of waiting another day... ;)

 

Certain monkeys in my area are open late, so I can just plan to pick the package up after the trucks get back to the corral, but I prefer having the package held so it doesn't bounce around in the truck all day.

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I have little things sent to the office sometimes, since we get a courier order every day anyway, and I work in the dept which receives materials. But I don't have my liquid refreshments sent there. I live relatively close to the pick-up, so I usually just call the number on the yellow slip and pop over in the evening.

 

I also bought a couple of huge Infinity speakers on EBay last year, and had them sent to my home address (Thank God!). Each speaker arrived in a double-sized box full of peanuts, and weighed 50 lb.

Edited by ThaddeusLysander

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Kübler is looking at this market long term & that is reflective in the pricing. I don't see Lucid being much of a competitor.

By your comment, did you mean you don't see Lucid as a direct competitor to Kübler at the price point, i.e. they are in differing markets, or did you mean in general Lucid is uncompetitive in the "US Legal" absinthe market?

 

I haven't tried the Kübler yet, but from reviews of their other products and Lucid I would put them squarely together.

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I don't see Lucid as much of a competitor for Kübler.

 

As far as them being squarely together, while I've not tried the Kübler approved for the US market I imagine it's better than Lucid.

 

It's interesting how long it took Kübler to get approved -vs- Lucid. It makes you ask why...

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No, I haven't yet. I need to do that. Just been really busy. I'll add the Kübler US as a category tonight, and try to write a review off of the notes I took while I was tasting it. Me being the dummy that I am, I took home the bottle of the Original instead of the U.S.

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It may be that Kübler was the first to jump on the barb-wire fence, allowing Lucid to run quickly across on their back.

If Kübler spent the time, money and effort for a couple of years breaking down barriers and resistance, it could be that when a domestic company came along wanting to do the same thing, the bureaucrats began to see it as an inevitable wave, and opened the floodgates, which allowed Viridian to jump first, with the ease of a domestic enterprise.

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Though the still seems to have issues with the word "Absinthe" on the label.

 

TTB: We're sending back your label application for your beverage "White Star Absinthe".

Distiller: Huh? We got too many thujones in it?

TTB: No. It's the word "Absinthe". You can't call this beverage "Absinthe".

Distiller: Huh? It is absinthe. The real thing, distilled from grande wormwood, fennel and anise. Natural colored with organic herbs.

TTB: None of that matters. You can't call it absinthe.

Distiller: Even if it is absinthe.

TTB: That's correct.

 

Distiller: :punk: (<--- distiller banging head on wall)

 

Distiller: You let Kübler call their absinthe absinthe.

TTB: But they're European and were making absinthe before we started approving absinthe.

Distiller: So American distillers can't call their American absinthe absinthe because they couldn't make absinthe before, but now that they can make it they can't call it that.

TTB: That's correct.

Distiller: :blowup:

 

Distiller: OK, I have an idea. How about if we drop the final e, then we technically wouldn't be calling it absinthe. Would that be OK?

TTB: That would be acceptable, so long as you don't try to deceive the public into thinking it might be absinthe.

Distiller: We'd never do that. ;) I'll make the change on our COLA for "White Star Absinth". Would it be alright if we called it "White Star American Absinth"?

TTB: That would be very good. Then there's no way to confuse the public into thinking your beverage is the same as the French absinthe that was banned because it's a dangerous hallucinogen.

 

Distiller: :wacko:

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There isn't an official class for "absinthe" like there is for neutral spirits, whisky, gin, brandy, applejack, rum, tequila, mezcal, liqueurs/cordials, flavored brandy (and flavored gin, rum, vodka and whisky), imitation distilled spirits, recognized cocktails, advocaat, aquavit and bitters, and since it doesn't really fit into any of those classes, it gets stuck in "distilled spirits specialty", the catch-all miscellaneous class.

 

However, you can name the product "Absinthe Superieure" for example, as part of its brand* or fanciful name. As long as the labeling and contents match up with what you're presenting the spirit as, they have no problem with it.

 

I appreciate their current diligence with labeling because it's going to help keep a lot of the sensationalist bandwagon-jumpers at bay.

 

This also underlines the necessity to establish a Class and/or a Type designation for absinthe which is based on historical knowledge and organoleptic analysis (tasting and smelling) of authentic absinthe.

 

In order for a spirit to fall into a class, it has to be of an appropriate proof and have the taste, aroma and characteristics generally attributed to that class of spirit. Since absinthe is so obscure and we have no established class for it, most people don't have a clue what characteristics should be attributed to absinthe, as our Eastern European friends have so amply demonstrated.

 

 

*Theoretically.

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I was making a joke based on the unsubstantiated report that St George was having difficulty getting the word "absinthe" approved for their label. As well as the detail oriented nature of the TTB when it comes to labeling. I know people in the brewing industry whose job includes creating labels and shepherding them through the approval process. I think their hair grays faster than normal people.

 

I agree with 98% of what Hiram wrote.

 

 

Thanks for catching that typo WBT, that is hysterical.

 

 

I saw what Stroller wrote; neener, neener, neener.

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Hiram's right. Technically, it can be called absinthe, but they have a major problem with it being more than a certain size on the label (see what Kübler had to do to its label).

 

Plus, it seems that they all have to have the disclaimer 'so-and-so spirits with herbs and spices' or something to that degree.

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That would be the "descriptive statement of content" that people need in order to know what they're actually getting. It functions in place of the missing class designation.

 

That's the problem with "fanciful" names. Sure, it says it's Ancient Dragon's Piss™, and I know it's not, but what is it really?

 

Oh, grain neutral spirits with natural asparagus flavoring and FD&C Yellow #5 for color. Got it.

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Suggested approaches:

"This is not absinthe"

"An aperitif for people who like absinthe"

Absinsational

Radsinthe

abs1nth3

Sinth of Ab

the aperitif formerly known as absinthe

ahbuhsinthuh

Screaming American Eagle Absinthe (Not that Frenchified "Moon Man" language stuff)

absintini

In Absinthia

AbsintheDew

Absinthe, the official drink of the TTB

O.J. Simpsinthe

ehtnisba

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4b51n7h3?

 

If they sold radsinthe I would mix it with Mountain Dew and chug it while I thrashed your dads in ground pool!

 

Then I would probably hit a wicked jump and catch a helicopter or something.

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