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AlyssaDyane

Kübler UPDATE!

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If you are so inclined to consider it, to the hobbyists out there, a brief but golden chance is happening right now.

 

Something about lightning in a bottle perhaps.

 

Shining by the light of the moon, perchance?

 

 

What in Great Odin's Raven are you babbling about?

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Checklist

 

  • 10,000 one-liter black-light activated green bottles
  • Couple tons of Hungarian wormwood
  • A pound or three of sweet fennel
  • A handful of fine Spanish anise
  • Two handfuls of coriander
  • A thimble of Malabar pepper
  • Three pounds calamus
  • Two pounds Elecampene
  • ½ cup nutmeg
  • ¼ cup mace
  • A pinch of tansy
  • 20,000 boxes of small matches imprinted with the brand name
  • 20,000 sugar cubes wrapped in fine paper imprinted with the brand name
  • 3,700 gallons of "Monarch" brand vodka
  • 40,000 flag stickers imprinted with "Made with Pride in the U.S.A."

Screw the anise, who needs it?

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Reply from Drinkup NY.

 

 

Hello Butch:

 

thanks for contacting us. We have been trying to find out the

distributor's name for NY State. As soon as we connect, we will bring it

in.

 

Regards,

Kamal

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Checklist
  • 10,000 one-liter black-light activated green bottles
  • Couple tons of Hungarian wormwood
  • A pound or three of sweet fennel
  • A handful of fine Spanish anise
  • Two handfuls of coriander
  • A thimble of Malabar pepper
  • Three pounds calamus
  • Two pounds Elecampene
  • ½ cup nutmeg
  • ¼ cup mace
  • A pinch of tansy
  • 20,000 boxes of small matches imprinted with the brand name
  • 20,000 sugar cubes wrapped in fine paper imprinted with the brand name
  • 3,700 gallons of "Monarch" brand vodka
  • 40,000 flag stickers imprinted with "Made with Pride in the U.S.A."

Screw the anise, who needs it?

 

 

Shouldn't that be titled "Czechlist"?

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[*]A pinch of tansy

 

Could be delivered anytime, anywhere, in any quantity, this summer's harvest was excellent :devil:

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I just got an email from drinkupny. They are now accepting preorders for the Kübler 53. $51.99 for 1 liter, expected to arrive second week of October. Free express shipping.

Edited by Marcel

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An email I just recieved from drinkupny.com. I see it will be selling for $51.99 which is $2.00 more than was expected, but it also qualifies for the free shipping so all in all its a great deal.

 

 

Dear Friend:

 

Kübler 53 is Coming to America. It is expected to arrive in second week of October'2007. We are accepting pre-orders now

 

Absinthe has been banned in the United States since 1912. Kübler is the first genuine Swiss absinthe to be sold in this country in nearly 100 years. It comes from the Val-de-Travers where absinthe was invented in the late 19th century and it is produced according to its original formula.

 

"Swiss Absinthe Superieure Kübler" is liquor distilled with herbs grown in the Val-de-Travers. Artemisia Absinthium (more commonly know as wormwood) is the primary ingredient in a formula that also includes coriander, mint, anise and fennel among other herbs and botanicals.'

 

We have also added a great selection of Wine & Spirits during the recent past. Please visit us at www.DrinkUpNY.com

 

Thanks for your continued support,

 

Warm Regards,

 

Customer Care Team

www.DrinkUpNY.com

 

Edit: Marcel beat me to it.

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I've always been curious as to why Blackmint hadn't suppressed the head of their column.

kubleralambicsml.jpg

 

If and when they do, I'd bet that anise-bomb character will probably mature into something more fragrant over the long haul, but it's going to stay somewhat phlegmatic - fresh off the alembic - without some changes to process (And I don't think they need to change their process… though I'd be pretty shocked if they weren't in the 6-8 mg/l range of thujone, for their method).

 

Most people that aren't familiar with the taste of absinthe flegmes, welcome Kübler with open arms. I don't mind the presence of flegmes in youthful absinthe, so long as the final product will have an opportunity to mature, as a managed proportion in the finished product can grow into a very positive flavor component over 6 months to a year.

 

Entering the market with a $50 dollar liter bottle is really saying a lot. That move really lends itself to the question "how determined is Blackmint to win over the American market over the span of five years?" Others may disagree, but to me it seems like a very bold statement.

 

So for all that, here's something I'm curious about: will these batches of 53° be an absinthe to sit on, or has Yves altered his treatment of his absinthe to give a less phlegmatic anise-bomb to the American market, as thujone should only matter to the regulatory bodies at this point. It should be obvious to all those concerned that it has no bearing on the quality of an absinthe - though I already see confused and illusory lines being drawn that somehow place American absinthe in a subcategory of absinthe at large re: thujone content. I'm suprised I haven't witnessed more vehement reactions from the section of absinthe producers on this board that asserts "we make absinthe proper, which is no way a compromise where "thujone-free" absinthe is concerned." I think we'll find that absinthe destined for the American market is in every way as artful, if not better, than nearly everything destined for the European market.

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There was an early version of Kübler a number of years ago, I think it was 60°, that was so phlegm-y it was ridiculous. I remember thinking, it tasted pretty good once in the mouth but it was kind of unpleasant to smell as you were taking a sip. The current 53° is quite a bit better. I'm glad they didn't go with the 45° for the US market. I bought a bottle of that in Zürich a few years ago and found it really insipid.

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<snip>

I think we'll find that absinthe destined for the American market is in every way as artful, if not better, than nearly everything destined for the European market.

 

First, hear! hear! That sounds like a very good thing indeed.

 

 

While I'm not knowledgeable in many of the areas M. Grim speaks, I'm certainly curious about several points raised. Perhaps, and this could be quite likely, given my lack of knowledge, I completely misunderstand everything.

 

There is the suggestion that there are specific absinthe production methods, perhaps in common use, that would yield thujone content in excess of the regulatory parameters. Given my complete lack of knowledge, I'm unsure whether this could be reference to differences in equipment (eg simple pot stills vs commercial pot stills with their columns, plates, and dephlemators) or to specific process methods.

 

As another example, does the Duplais protocol yield a product meeting regulatory constraints given a wormwood of common commerce?

 

Regarding

 

Entering the market with a $50 dollar liter bottle ... seems like a very bold statement

 

Yes. It does set pricing and expectations for all that follow. A $100/liter absinthe, even a very good one, will have a more difficult time gaining clientele.

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When I get paid on Friday and take care of bills I will see if I can afford a preorder. I think I will flask it on my nights on the town in between now and then, I will undoubtedly save at least $50.

I'm getting butterflies just thinking about it! I mean, I'm excited.

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Grim,

 

I hae a whole bunch of questions regarding your post.

 

Are flegmes another word for tails? What is "suppressing" the head of their column and how would this help in reducing flegmes? If flegmes are simply tails why not just make more aggressive cuts to eliminate? I am somewhat curious as to the actual art of making absinthe and it sounds by your post that the anise character and thujone (I presume many of the other essential oils) come over in the tails which I suspect means that they are tied up in the fusels.

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I've preordered a bottle. I'm thrilled to make my first domestic absinthe purchase.

 

So the Lucid you reviewed was a gift not a purchase? ;)

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When I get paid on Friday and take care of bills I will see if I can afford a preorder.

 

I am kind of in the same boat right now. I have started doing "Pay per post" blogging to create an Absinthe fund. As long as I keep up what I am doing now I will have around $500 a month for my favorite beverage. :)

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