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Roast beef recipe?


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#1 jacksonm

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 01:19 PM

Hi,
Anybody got a good recipe for roast beef? I'm planning on making one tomorrow and thought I might like to try something different, you know if somebody has a favorite recipe I just might try it :-)

.

#2 MMarking

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 03:37 PM

Yup, but you might find it a bit unconventional.

When I make a standing rib roast, as for instance at Christmas, I rinse it in water and pat dry. Then I rub it all over with olive oil. (this line should draw smart-arse comments from the peanut gallery :devil: ) Sprinkle sea salt and fresh cracked pepper over the whole thing and then insert your meat thermometer into the center of the roast.

Here comes the unconventional part.

Turn your oven to 140 degrees F. and cook the roast for about 18-24 hours to the desired temperature. No danger of the roast over cooking at that temp. You don't get the extrordinary amount of pan drippings that you do with a conventional temperature but the roast is so moist you can practically suck it through a straw! Don't worry about e-coli because that only happens with the exposed surfaces of the meat, not the interior.
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#3 ShaiHulud

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 04:00 PM

I have some, contact me if interested

Awesome Roast Beef - $25,000.00
Great Roast Beef - $15,000.00
Good Roast Beef - $7,000.00
Not Bad Roast Beef - $5,000.00
Litany against fear of Absinthe - I must not fear Absinthe. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my Absinthe. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the Absinthe has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

#4 Nymphadora

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 04:04 PM

I love that worm. :cheers:
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

#5 Daniel Lyons

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 04:05 PM

:laf: I almost cried!

#6 Gwydion Stone

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 04:06 PM

I love that worm.

We knew that. ;)

Good one, Shai!

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#7 LeRoy

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 04:08 PM

Wow, Shai
I'll probably have to opt for the- Dropped On The Ground and Stepped On Recipe-for those prices!


...Although, I don't see that one listed. :g:

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#8 MMarking

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 04:29 PM

As usual, I post too late.

But it really is a good way to roast your beef, so to speak. :devil:
Good friends are the family you wish you had been born into.

War is not the answer, for only love can conquer hate.
Marvin Gaye

#9 ShaiHulud

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 05:40 PM

You are not too late, just too nice. That's not a bad thing to be.
Litany against fear of Absinthe - I must not fear Absinthe. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my Absinthe. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the Absinthe has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

#10 Joe Legate

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 06:18 PM

Changing from beef to Ham, what will you be doing in Mame, ShaiHulud?





Damn, that sounds down right dirty. :devil:

#11 ShaiHulud

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 09:02 AM

small part, in and out... (no one out dirtys me)

Mr. Upson, actually, and a bunch of chorus stuff. I don't know the show at all and am unfamiliar with the music (except, We need a Little Christmas, of course). The funny thing is, Mrs. Upson is played by a very nice woman in her early 60's with old school breast implants.
Litany against fear of Absinthe - I must not fear Absinthe. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my Absinthe. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the Absinthe has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

#12 Nymphadora

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 09:51 AM

(no one out dirtys me)


Sounds like a challenge.
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

#13 Joe Legate

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 09:53 AM

Ah! The over-bearing rich dude with the honey daiquiris, I believe. It's been years since I've worked that show and memory fades so I could easily be very wrong. Another trip to Zoo-town!

#14 Absomphe

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 04:01 PM

I have some, contact me if interested

Awesome Roast Beef - $25,000.00
Great Roast Beef - $15,000.00
Good Roast Beef - $7,000.00
Not Bad Roast Beef - $5,000.00


Do we actually get the recipes, or just those domain names?

I hear you sand worms bargain like Ferengi. :pirate:

Yes, I'm Krinkles the Clown on an absinthe a beer bender.

You got a problem with that?


#15 Trid

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 04:58 PM

As usual, I post too late.

But it really is a good way to roast your beef, so to speak. :devil:


For what it's worth, I'll make use of your recipe :thumbup:
It sounds right nifty...almost like doing a prime rib.
Some people are like slinkies....not really useful for anything, but you can't help but to smile when you see them tumbling down a flight of stairs.

#16 Attack Accountant

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 07:15 PM

In our healthy society of today, I think a lot of flavor is lost in trying to make beef and chicken healthier by cutting out the fat, thus cutting out the flavor. A recipe can be improved by using beef or chicken broth when water is recommended.
I think I'm funny but no one else does.

#17 ShaiHulud

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 09:43 AM

Ah! The over-bearing rich dude with the honey daiquiris, I believe. It's been years since I've worked that show and memory fades so I could easily be very wrong. Another trip to Zoo-town!

I think you are right. I know I have an estate that I have named the Upson Downs.
Litany against fear of Absinthe - I must not fear Absinthe. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my Absinthe. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the Absinthe has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

#18 MTgrayling

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 10:01 AM

This is a wonderful recipe from my childhood autumns and local fairs. I'd put a stay on my half decade long Beef boycott if I came across some Ox roast. :thumbup:

Tom Hill’s Ox Roast

8 ½ to 10 pounds beef round roast
3 pounds pork bones
Salt
Pepper

Generously season the beef with salt and pepper. Place in slow cooker. Top with pork bones. Cover and cook on low heat (200 degrees) for about 4 hours, or until the internal temperature is 140 degrees.

Remove meat from cooker and allow cool. Wrap in foil and refrigerate overnight.

Remove bones from the juices and discard. Place in container and refrigerate overnight.

The next day remove meat and juices from fridge. Skim fat from top of juices and reheat. Thinly slice beef with knife – an electric knife would work nicely here. Put into pan with juices and serve warm over a nice roll.

Recipes from PA

The black bean and corn salad is awesome as well!
I had my taste buds amputated many years ago after an unfortunate toothbrush accident, any reviews or opinions I give are suspect and should be viewed as utterly useless.

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#19 Pan Buh

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 11:09 AM

I guessing there are several people here that would be willing to try that out on a kimmelweck role with horseradish and a pitcher of beer.

#20 baubel

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 03:56 PM


I have some, contact me if interested

Awesome Roast Beef - $25,000.00
Great Roast Beef - $15,000.00
Good Roast Beef - $7,000.00
Not Bad Roast Beef - $5,000.00


Do we actually get the recipes, or just those domain names?

I hear you sand worms bargain like Ferengi. :pirate:



Ferengi witch must leave.

A little technological fix to a spiritual problem.


#21 ShaiHulud

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 04:19 PM

Don't disturb me just now. I finally got Pensive to stroke my lobes.
Litany against fear of Absinthe - I must not fear Absinthe. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my Absinthe. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the Absinthe has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

#22 OMG_Bill

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 04:21 PM

Lucky bastid. ;)
Some folks may cringe each time I use the term "Booze" regarding these high quality drinks.
I mean no offense. There are bottles of extraordinary booze out there. I've tasted a few. Relax.

#23 Joe Legate

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 07:58 PM

Don't disturb me just now. I finally got Pensive to stroke my lobes.

Pensive is hot. Please take photos.

#24 Wamplet

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 04:47 PM

I usually make mine on Sunday:

It takes about half an hour in total preparation and about 3 hours to fully cook.


It can be made by itself, but I like to make white rice and serve the roast over it.

Here is what you will need:

-2 to 3.5 lb. pot roast. (There are many varieties of cuts and qualities, but I generally get something that is marbled, as it will be even more tender when you cook it.) Just about anything that says pot roast will do though.

-1 large yellow onion
-2 to 5 cloves of garlic (depends on the size of the cloves and how much you like garlic)
-1 can of whole peeled tomatoes
-4 or 5 medium red potatoes (you can also substitute the same weight with the very small red potatoes)
-2 or 3 large carrots
-2 or 3 celery stalks
-2 cans of beef broth (I normally use Swanson)
-8 to 12 whole cloves (depends on size of meat you get)
-1 small handful of fresh chopped parsley (Flat Italian or curly)
-1/2 cup of red wine
-2 teaspoons of dried Thyme
-2 to 4 bay leaves


plain salt
pepper
flour
oil (olive or vegetable)


Get a plate and put the meat onto it.
-Liberally sprinkle salt over the first side of meat. I usually use about 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoon per side of meat.
-Sprinkle pepper over the first side of meat. (this is up to your preference, but I generally apply a fairly hefty coat to it.
- Now put in 4-6 cloves on the first side of the meat. If the meat is too hard, you can cut slit with a small knife and then put in the clove stem. (I usually put the stem all the way in, but leave the dried flower bulb sticking out on top.)
- Coat the meat with plenty of flour on the first side.

-Now, turn the meat over on and repeat the coating process, with the salt, pepper, cloves, and flour.

-Heat an 8qt. stockpot with 3-4 teaspoons of oil on medium. (I usually use olive oil for this, but feel free to use any kind)

-After the oil is hot, add the coated roast meat into the pot. (be careful of the oil)
Cook the meat for 10 minutes, 5 minutes per side. As it cooks, I would recommend swirling the pot around carefully to keep the meat and flour from sticking too much to the pot. Just be careful of the oil, again.

-As the meat starts cooking in the pot, go ahead and prepare the garlic and onion.
chop the garlic cloves and slice the onion into quarters. (cut in half and then cut the halves again).
***Note, as the roast cooks, the onions will nearly dissolve by the time the roast is done, so if you want to have some onions at the end, You can cut another onion up in quarters or just add in a few small boiling or pearl onions later when the rest of the vegetables are added.

-Open the can of tomatoes and pour the juice into a bowl or cup. (save it for addition to the broth in a bit)
take the tomatoes and in another bowl, hand strip them into smaller pieces. (into 1/4 of it's size is fine) Also, if they have hard stem ends, you can cut those out with your fingers or a knife.

-The meat should be done browning by now or if it hasn't, wait for it to cook the 10 minutes and then take it out with a spatula or tongs (whatever you are comfortable with) and then transfer to a plate.

-Turn down the heat just a little bit and put in the onion and chopped garlic. Cook for 5 minutes. As they cook, go ahead and get a metal spoon and scrape all the bits of flour from the meat that is stuck to the bottom and sides and just mix with the garlic and onions.

-add the tomatoes (without the liquid) and cook for 2 minutes.

-add 2 cans of beef broth into the pot
-add the tomato juice into the pot
-add the 1/2 cup of red wine into the pot
-add the thyme
-add the bay leaves

-Add the meat back into the pot and turn the heat up to bring to a boil.

-Once a boil is reached cover the pot and then turn the heat down to simmer.

-Cook for 1.5 hours.


Use this time to cut up the rest of the vegetables, which you will add after the 1.5 hours is up.

I usually get 2 plates for this, because it's a lot of veggies to work with. (1 to chop on and 1 to collect)

-Wash the celery stalks and cut them into bite sized chunks.
-Peel the carrots and then cut them up as you prefer. (I cut them both ways, into rounded slices and strips. To do this, I normally cut the carrots in half and cut the larger ends into the round slices and then I cut the thinner ends into long strips in quarters)
-Grab a handful of fresh parsley (8-10 stems) and cut the ends about 2 inches from the bottom and discard the bottoms. Now, chop the rest up.
-Wash the red potatoes. If they are medium sized, I would recommend cutting them into slices or at least quarters. If you bought the baby red potatoes, you can usually leave these alone, although some of the baby ones may need to be halved.

I put all the veggies in a plate and then cover them with plastic wrap and just put them in the fridge until it's time to add them.

-Once the 1.5 hours of cooking is up, flip the meat over and add the plate of prepared vegetables into the pot. Cover the pot and cook for 1.5 hours.

My wife always makes the rice or else I would write how to do that as well, but if you want to make rice, I'd recommend making it when the roast has about 30-45 mins left to cook.

After the pot roast meat has cooked a total of 3 hours, you can turn the oven off.

Now this part is completely up to you, but after letting the roast rest for a few minutes, I usually get a metal spoon and then slowly scoop/skim out the oil from the top. Granted, a majority of it will be from the cooking oil and if you used Olive oil, you can either leave it in or go ahead and remove some. Some of it is also oil and grease brought out from cooking the meat's fat. Just gently lay the spoon as shallow and flat as you can into the top layer and just spoon out the oily layer. Regardless of what oil I used, I usually scoop out as much oil as I can. I'd say about 10-20 spoons worth is enough. Once you start getting half of the spoon filled with juice, you can stop. You will visibly know when you can stop, as the juice will be darker and at the bottom of the spoon.

I would also recommend adding a little extra salt. Depending on how much you added when you originally coated the meat, it might need 1 more teaspoon. I'd just add half a teaspoon at a time first, stir it in, and then taste until it meats your tastes.

Finally, I like to get the roast meat and try to get as many of the cloves out of it. I use a small shrimp fork for this, although you can use a regular fork too. Most of the cloves will be soft enough to eat, but I still try to get them out and discard. You can also discard the bay leaves if you wish or just fish them out as you come to them in your plate. :)

Serve over the rice on a plate or bowl.

#25 Brooks

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 08:36 PM

You've obviously explored and fine-tuned this recipe over time. Looks like a winner! Thanks for all the detail. :cheers:

#26 Wamplet

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 07:45 PM

Thank you!

I definitely have.

I'm sure a lot of people around here cook and may not need to know the extra tidbits, but I wanted to include stuff like that, because it's never included in my cookbooks and it's just simple stuff that makes the process easier for me and hopefully anyone else who tries it. :)

#27 Brooks

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:43 PM

I cook very rarely, so when I do cook, detail isn't just helpful — it's critical!

You're right about there being a lot of cooks on this forum. A lot of these folks eat high off the hog all the time. Very impressive!


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