Jump to content
Boggy

Piołunówka, modern but still...

Recommended Posts

Whether imported or produced, it was available as there was a demand for such spirits at that time. Just like there were times for Maraschino, or other famous styles. The love for anise spirits can be traced back to Medieval Europe, but after 1960's there is a concentration of these especially in the Mediterranean, what explains the rise of ouzo, raki, arak, mastika, and notably pastis, whereas the other parts of Europe and far have shifted their interest. And the Medieval people have had the sweetest tooth AFAIK as opposed to the other centuries.

 

As you know, I have found various catalogues of well-known Polish distillers and in their portfolio not only absinthe is included, but its derivatives, like rosoglio or creme. And it's just the beginning.

Edited by Boggy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1613:

 

2w59b8h.jpg

 

Not very detailed, but distilled, calls for 50.68g of wormwood. This is the second, after Falimierz, oldest piołunówka recipe.

 

This book, from 1820, however, reveals a more interesting recipe-to be credited as the first absinthe of Polish origin. The ingredients are simple, but the result is said to be coloured green and there is no mentioning of sweetening:

 

33tm79f.jpg

 

2eyf61f.jpg

Edited by Boggy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the result is said to be coloured green

 

What fools! Too bad you weren't around in 1820 to tell them how to do it the historically accurate way.

 

:devil:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, as much as you're right, the author mentions that unscrupulous producers colour by means of indigo or saffron or worse, use copper compounds and calls them criminals advising the same time to colour with herbs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:laf:

 

Oh, wait, that's not funny. :laugh:

 

 

Too bad you weren't around in 1820 to tell them how to do it the historically accurate way.

 

I was, but when I gave them my advice, they just thought I was clownin' around. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boggy, not many of us are as well versed in Polish or even Old Polish as you. so translations would be welcome. But it looks like they were a bunch of wormwood heads back then. You can correct me if I'm wrong, which is quite possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure.

 

12 handfuls of wormwood

5 handfuls of melissa

1 and a half handful of green anise

52g of "green" oranges (Fructus Aurantii Immaturus)

 

One needs 30 litres of spirit at 80-84% and can go two ways:

 

(everything is detailed in paragraph 900)

 

1) 8 hours of digestion

2) 2 days of maceration

 

After distillation it is said to be coloured green.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, bunch of wormwood heads all across the lands. The very early recipes for "liqueur d'absinthe" or "creme d'absinthe" from Switzerland/France call for a good measure of artemisias sometimes. The recipe above "likier piołunowy" could be translated as "liqueur d'absinthe" respectively. Especially, when talking about the period of time when the term "liqueur" referred to a strong spirit, not necessarily oversweetened if at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×