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I got the chance to try some the other night, and enjoyed it quite a bit. I'll probably get a bottle when my other bottles start running low, if nothing else, because the price is kinder on the wallet.

 

I do have to admit, I could almost detect some kind of fishy gunk in the aroma, but once louched, I found it to be very palatable, being only a little thin in flavor.

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Believe me, I take no exception to Oscar's opinion. I think Lucid rates a resounding "OK" but the price makes it much nicer. On those grounds and qualifiers, I'd still recommend it and enjoy an occasional glass. :cheers:

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We also need to remember, that for a newbie to absinthe, their palate won't be nearly as developed as most of the people weighing in on this. There's a good chance that they wouldn't be able to pick up on a lot of the subtle nuances of a more expensive product yet.

 

I agree that it isn't the best, but it's a good start. Like someone I respect said recently, it opened the door. It paved the way for much better stuff to come in down the line.

 

I also don't mind it too much. I can just pick up on the fishiness before louching, but with water added, it's almost completely gone.

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Did I say Nyqil? Embarrassing!

 

 

 

 

 

I meant Robitussin.

 

HA! Now THAT is humor.

Ok, In my opinion Lucid is not good absinthe

That's cuz yer spoilt.

 

Lucky bastid.

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Let's consult an authority: Lewis Black.

 

Robitussin, why ya bother? Non-narcotic sissy pansy bullshit... Nyquil has the best thing I've ever read on a medicine bottle: 180 proof. It's the moonshine of medicine.

 

Back to the topic for a second: I don't think anyone thinks Lucid is the greatest stuff on earth. I got to try it last week (Thanks, Joe!) and I think it's fine; not the greatest, not the worst, and with the price, therefore a fine starter. That may be all it is, but that's better than nothing.

 

I have a bottle of Arak over here and frankly I don't see what all the fuss is about. The resemblance to absinthe is lost on me and on the subject of non-absinthe anise-derived adult beverages, I vastly prefer the taste of sambuca, pedestrian though that may be. Assuming that newbies like myself have unrefined palates I'd suggest it's probably fairer to recommend a decent starter absinthe that won't cause sticker shock than a non-absinthe altogether.

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Why didn't they just put the Jades forward? I would have thought you'd want to get the best in first so people tasting it for the first time would not think "this tastes like mould, I don't like absinthe". Or maybe Lucid was made for the 'American palate', and since we've all be drinking absinthe where the anise isn't shy we'd think it tastes weird.

 

King - Did you use ice-water? The first time I had absinthe I used water from the fridge and the taste was pretty flat.

 

Dakini - My 'soon' is a month or two.

 

 

Yes, I used ice water. I'll try a higher water ratio this weekend (along with trying no sugar), and report back.

 

I got to say, I did enjoy the sparkling wine/absinthe combo, and will definately be trying that again.

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I have a bottle of Arak over here and frankly I don't see what all the fuss is about. The resemblance to absinthe is lost on me...

Have you tried Kübler or La Troublante or any of the other VDT blanches (other than Clandestine)?

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Or maybe Lucid was made for the 'American palate', and since we've all be drinking absinthe where the anise isn't shy we'd think it tastes weird.

 

An acquaintance of mine in NoLA met with Ted, and apparently that's exactly the case. It was made with the intent of suiting the "American Palate."

 

Then again, it's "friend-of-a-friend" sort of hearsay, but that's my understanding of it.

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Why didn't they just put the Jades forward?
If I were going to speculate on business strategies, I'd say it's because they, Viridian, commisioned Ted to develop an absinthe for them. The Jades belong to someone else.

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(Thanks, Joe!)

I have a bottle of Arak over here and frankly I don't see what all the fuss is about.

My pleasure, Daniel. Anytime.

 

Arak is pretty much straight forward. It's a refreshing little beverage that I enjoy...for what it is. No complexity but it delivers exactly what it promises and there is nothing wrong with that. Kinda reminds me of me. ;)

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After my post today, I decided to do a little side by side with lucid. Granted, the others are pretty well known among this crowd.

 

I had a bit of Angelique and Prototype 31. The Lucid was poor compared to those. Perhaps poor isn't the best choice of words but it wasn't as "familiar" as what I'm accustomed to.

 

Lucid by itself is still something I wouldn't be afraid to serve to someone that hasn't had absinthe before. They could play with and with out sugar.

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Are you trying to say you are not a complex person? Give me a break. I have known you far too long to think that. :nono:

Shhh. I'm trying to lull them into a false sense of ...something or other. B)

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Ah, but it (Lucid) IS an absinthe, and that, Arak, is not. And by the way, I like Lucid at least until something better comes along. Arak was OK, but too simple and not green. Which, my eyes tell me, is important to my taste buds.

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The thing I like most about Lucid is the wormwood. It's not great, but it's definitely not too shabby. And, to my tastes at least, it's very forward in the flavour and aroma. Despite that, I enjoy wormwood-free Razzouk more. I figure most of what I don't like about Lucid is due to distillation issues. Meaning it could get better. I hope.

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I also don't mind it too much. I can just pick up on the fishiness before louching, but with water added, it's almost completely gone.

 

I also get the fishiness aroma neat, it's much less noticeable toward the bottom of the glass, but still there.

 

In my opinion it is a great stater absinthe; to start a newbie off with and to start with for the night. I did have a glass at the end of a night of 5 different absinthes and it did hold it own against such heavyweights as Duplais verte, Jade 1901 and Ike. My friend who alternates between Dulpais verte and Ike 68 as his favorite has rated Lucid as his least favorite.

 

I'm just so happy that real absinthe is legal again. :yahoo:

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Kind of what Dan said, and kind of what Speedle said. I found the Lucid better than I expected it to be. It was a nice way to start a very nice evening when I tried it with Dan, T, and Maggie. It was better than some of the absinthe's I've tried, but not as good as the ones I like. As for Arak, I prefer other graduated beverages, but I prefer most vertes over most blanches. I'd buy a bottle of Lucid over a bottle of Arak, but I'd wait and save up until I had enough to buy a bottle of some other verte instead of Lucid.

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Peridot: nope, CLB (all three variations) and one HG are all I've had by way of blanche. I am thinking about having some arak here in a bit if I'm still up, just in case my tastes have changed or the bottle's improved in the past 4 months.

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Or maybe Lucid was made for the 'American palate', and since we've all be drinking absinthe where the anise isn't shy we'd think it tastes weird.

 

An acquaintance of mine in NoLA met with Ted, and apparently that's exactly the case. It was made with the intent of suiting the "American Palate."

 

Then again, it's "friend-of-a-friend" sort of hearsay, but that's my understanding of it.

 

 

That's what he's said in all of his interviews as well. It's also noted on the Lucid website.

 

 

I think it's silly to presume what Americans will like in absinthe. Just because arak, ouzo, etc. have never been popular doesn't mean people won't like absinthe. The variety possible in absinthe is astounding. Thinking that absinthe should be like something you've already had, eg pre-Ban or Duplais or a Jade, limits you quite a bit.

 

Most people know nothing about absinthe. And that includes knowing what it's supposed to taste like.

 

Just my 02¢.

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We also need to remember, that for a newbie to absinthe, their palate won't be nearly as developed as most of the people weighing in on this. There's a good chance that they wouldn't be able to pick up on a lot of the subtle nuances of a more expensive product yet.

 

I agree that it isn't the best, but it's a good start. Like someone I respect said recently, it opened the door. It paved the way for much better stuff to come in down the line.

 

I've got to agree with you here. Even though I have yet to taste other high quality Absinthes, I doubt they will ever be in my regular drinking rituals due to the sheer cost. The truth is most of America probably wouldn't. There's a lot more Johnny Walker red and black sold than Johnny Walker blue. And when you look at the "lower quality" Lucid, it still isn't cheap at $60 a bottle, I think it was absolutely a sound and smart business decision to create and put out Lucid, since people have been saying it's at least OK when compared to the more expensive brands. I haven't heard (actually read) that many people HATE it, most reviews seem to be positive. So most people are gonna step back and pay an already high price (relatively speaking) for the Lucid and get a decent product. I know for myself, I could never justify to myself buying a $120+ of Absinthe, especially since I know I don't have a refined palate. I'm also not one that sits back and studies what I drink (and smoke when it comes to cigars, which I've been smoking for a very long time), either it's good or it's not. Yes there are nuances, but for me if I like it I consume it, if I don't I won't. And I don't ever think I'll be able to truly discern enough of a difference in taste to justify paying twice to three times as much for something else. I enjoy Jack Daniels, but usually buy Woodford Reserve. I can taste a difference, like one a little more than the other, and the additional amount that I pay for the Woodford I think is worth it. Now if Woodford was $60 a bottle, I wouldn't really be buying it all that much. Ok I'm done.

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I think it's silly to presume what Americans will like in absinthe. [snip]

 

Most people know nothing about absinthe. And that includes knowing what it's supposed to taste like.

We do have to consider the very real fact that, unlike France and much of Europe, both fennel and anise have very little to do with what the U.S. markets see in their food and drink. It's not a flavor that many people grow up with, or are fond of.

 

Ted's approach to Lucid wasn't necessarily what an absinthe "should" taste like. If it were, then he wouldn't have reduced the anise. Instead, it was more in line with what the U.S. population might be open minded to at first. A small foray into the anethole and fenchone effects on the palate.

 

I'm sure that many of the brands that will be coming on to the market soon (relative) will be more along the lines of typical absinthe in their anise profiles. However, I'm also pretty sure that some people will take some creative license, and do some REALLY great things by changing it up a bit. ;)

 

 

And I don't ever think I'll be able to truly discern enough of a difference in taste to justify paying twice to three times as much for something else.

You just wait, my friend. You just wait. :harhar:

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I think it's silly to presume what Americans will like in absinthe. Just because arak, ouzo, etc. have never been popular doesn't mean people won't like absinthe. The variety possible in absinthe is astounding. Thinking that absinthe should be like something you've already had, eg pre-Ban or Duplais or a Jade, limits you quite a bit.

 

Most people know nothing about absinthe. And that includes knowing what it's supposed to taste like.

 

Just my 02¢.

I wish you were right, Dakini but clearly you have more faith in the American consumer than I. American cheese, yellow mustard, American pilsner, white-sliced bread... We excel at blandness. ;)

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I've never presumed that we'll convert the masses of Swill Lite beer drinkers.

 

I'm assuming the initial market is more towards those already buying spirits and perhaps some of the wine drinkers. And that's a mighty big market.

 

Yes, Shabba, the if the selection at HAN II was any indication, absinthe in America has a really bright future. B)

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We Americans really do excell at blandness. I am a prime example of "you are what you eat". ;)

 

It's been said that I'm as dull as dirt, maybe my diet needs attention. I know that tastes evolve or I'd hope they would. Some folks are comfy in their ruts. The rest of us aren't so we do something about it.

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I have to agree with Dakini. While we as a nation do excel in blandness (and mediocrity) the demand for full flavored foods has grown exponentially over the last few decades. No need to pander condescendingly to the public where absinthe is concerned. We should go for quality. I think most of the best absinthes on the planet are made here in the US by Americans so assuming that a weak "starter absinthe" is needed is, in my opinion wrong. The nature of capitalism dictates that there will be a range of absinthes from cheaply produced crap like Deva. LaFee and Tabu oil mixes to finer artisinal brands. We, as consumers should demand well made, complex, absinthes of the best quality.

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I've never presumed that we'll convert the masses of Swill Lite beer drinkers.

 

I'm assuming the initial market is more towards those already buying spirits and perhaps some of the wine drinkers. And that's a mighty big market.

 

When it comes to discussing the potential future of absinthe we have to be aware of the simple way consumers…consume.

 

Generally speaking consumption is based on ideology. The 18-21 bracket drink swill lite beer because it’s cheap and gets them drunk. The 22-25+ bracket drink swill lite beer because it’s associated with youth, and they don’t want to be looking old in a bar. From there you have people who drink wine and spirits because the former is associated with sophistication and maturity, the latter with wisdom and age (not to even get into the politics of the different spirits).

 

Unfortunately the image that absinthe is currently associated with is shot glasses and heated spoons by flames (which itself has association with heroin), which give it mysticism – why set fire to the sugar? It’s not surprising absinthe is seen as a drug and many people are afraid to even try it.

 

The Czech macerators have done a very, very, very good job at marketing their product. The 18-21 crowd who want to get wasted and high see absinthe as the ultimate shooter, and that’s a huge problem. If we see it as unrealistic to convert the masses of ‘swill lite beer drinkers’, why is it considered plausible to associate absinthe with anything other than the shooter crowd – the very same crowd that drink swill lite beer?

 

Telling the crowd that drink swill lite beer that ‘the hops and barley used are inferior’ isn’t going to make them stop drinking it anymore than telling people the facts about absinthe is going to make people stop shooting it. Sure, they might try preparing it the correct way, just like they may try a good beer, but at the end of the day they’ll go back to what is associated with their age bracket and their lifestyle. My point is: having reviews and articles in respected journals are only going to help to open peoples’ minds. We live in a world of images, and absinthe needs a new image.

 

We know absinthe is a complex drink, to take time preparing, and to enjoy. We know each bottle is different. It’s a sophisticated product, and its mysticism is far from dangerous. What image is there today that is associated with these qualities? The belle époque is over; the famous artists that have the power to influence popular culture and ideology are actors, film-makers, and musicians. Can the fast moving world of Hollywood be associated with absinthe? Is New York a good place to start the absinthe revolution? Possibly, a good number of artists are there, and with NY being famed for moving so quickly absinthe would be a good way to make the artists there stand out from the rest of the crowd, and would associate absinthe with the image we’d want – compared to NY it’s slow, calm, and leisurely. This image could spread from NY to the rest of America or even the world, but personally I think actors etc are going to have to get in on it, and I don’t believe they can give it the image appropriate, not unless hollywood changes and starts making the type of films they made in the 70s....IOW, hollywood would need a revolution to be associated with the absinthe revolution.

 

At the moment Absinthe has the shooter image to compete with, and I’m not talking about ‘converting the market’. I’m talking about creating a new semiotic for absinthe, because currently absinthe means hallucinations, shooters, fire, and 18-21.

 

In my opinion, absinthe could do with a new name, then it wouldn’t have to dispel the myths, because it wouldn’t be associated with them in the first place.

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