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Lucid marketing mess

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Is that a rhetorical question?

 

At the restaurant where my girlfriend manages, a glass of single malt is anywhere from $10-$40.

 

Cognac goes up to $100 for 1 ounce (Louis XIII).

 

So, good point.

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And at Johnny's Rock and Roll Saloon, I have never paid more than $5 for a top shelf liquor.

 

Of course, he keeps his prices low by not turning on the lights. It's a pretty dark bar. I will have to ask him how much he would charge.

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The Lucid-etched glasses are neat, but it looks like there's zero clearance under the fountain spigots once the sugar cube is in place.
The bar should've gotten a four-spigot fountain. They're taller.

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Cocktails at the upscale bars in places like New York and San Francisco are currently in the $10-15 range.

 

Hotel bars are always expensive.

 

$18 doesn't surprise me.

 

You should visit London. There, cocktails are in the 10-15 Pound range. Basically, $20-30 US, thanks to the wonderful exchange rate.

 

~Erik

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Manhattan is overrun with ecstatic visitors from the UK. For them, it's like vacationing in Mexico, circa 1954.

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Cognac goes up to $100 for 1 ounce (Louis XIII).

 

Outrageous.

 

I remember paying $150 for a very generous shot of real Napoleon III brandy in the mid eighties at Jake O'Shaughnessy's in Belevue.

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It is outrageous. A bottle costs about $1700 retail too. I got to sample some for free (the only way I would). I'll tell you, there are people here who will pay that price (just to show off how much money they have). What a bunch of fools.

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$300 for once ounce of the Louis here in DC. Any decent scotch will run you $15 at least. Macallan 30 year old will cost $30-40 depending on where you get it.

 

That's at bars and restaurants. Expect to pay at least 50% more at a hotel bar.

 

I'm sitting in a room at the Ritz Carlton in DC right now looking at their drink menu. Chivas, Johnnie Black, Glenmorangie 10, and Macallan 12 are $15 a piece.

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So, it seems like we've pretty much established that the pricing of the drink at a bar, per se, isn't really the problem? But rather that the real issue is lack of "cool" factor or lack of bartender passion and knowledge? I know they can't advertise on TV, but I can't think of where else hard liquor is advertised at the moment. Maybe the occasional billboard I've seen in Vegas (because there are practically no billboards up here), but that's it.

 

Indeed, it seems like they, i.e. the Lucid team, have had every opportunity possible, with regard to the mass media, haven't they?

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If I was in their cat-fur googly-eye slippers I might wake up a bit and do some basic advertising. Say a few bar/club specific parties featuring a night of the illusive drink (including playing up the overall limited quantity compared to standard liquor) to get the ball rolling.

 

Right now the bartenders are hurting their profits and image. If someone pays almost $20 for a glass the bartender better at least know how to prepare it, and provide a good drink, otherwise people will assume it's Lucid's fault for tasting bad and not poor preparation.

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I wonder if the people here shocked at $18/shot for Lucid are used to drinking well drinks at the neighborhood bar. Where do you folks usually go?

 

I know I pay $4 for a well G&T, or $7 for a T&T. (Most bars I go to don't have Hendrick's.)

 

Compared to $4, $18 is a lot. If one of those places suddenly had $18 drinks next to the $4 well G&T, I'd not be having too many $18 cocktails. I'd be shocked, too.

 

If, on the other hand, I was used to a place that served well drinks at $8-10, and call at $12, and top shelf $14 - 15, then $18 for a new product that's not yet readily available everywhere in the US would seem reasonable.

 

I guess the question is, what's the normal price range at these bars that stock Lucid?

 

BTW, I can buy a bottle of Tanqueray or Hendrick's for about $30 at the grocery store. 4-5 drinks at the bar, or a whole bottle at home.

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How much is a shot of $60-a-bottle single malt in a nice bar these days?

 

I got hit for $12 at the Portland, OR Hilton bar for Talisker. The same shot at the Anaheim Doubletree was $8.

 

Feh... :poop:

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I wonder if the people here shocked at $18/shot for Lucid are used to drinking well drinks at the neighborhood bar. Where do you folks usually go?

 

Dives mostly. If I'm in a bar that serves such drinks, firstly I'm in the wrong place, secondly I'll probably be downing water or whatever cheap dreck is on tap. Yep I'm a cheap bastard that has better liquor at home than most bars carry.

 

I'd say I need to get out more but from the sound of it I can't afford it anyway.

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Well, it seems as if there's at least one event planned in NY:

 

(from lenells.com)

 

"Thursday, August 23, 2007

THURS 7PM-9PM

 

Taste the first legal absinthe in 95 years! Meet the brand owners, learn about classic absinthe cocktails, and see a reproduction absinthe fountain demo complete with sugar cube and spoons."

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And at Johnny's Rock and Roll Saloon, I have never paid more than $5 for a top shelf liquor.

 

Of course, he keeps his prices low by not turning on the lights. It's a pretty dark bar. I will have to ask him how much he would charge.

 

You know, just because the bottle is located at the top shelf doesn't mean it's a quality liquor.

 

In best case you'd get 20 drinks out of a 75cl bottle. $5 a drink makes $100 per bottle. Way too little to cover expenses involved in the "top shelf liquor". I think ol' Johnny's playing tricks on you.

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On the top-shelf they usually put something that is popular if not that great quality.

 

Best, rare or not-that-legal stuff is usually well-hidden and you have to ask for it, coz no one will tell you.

 

20 drinks out of 750 ml? I was thinking about 15.

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A friend of mine was telling me that when he ordered a shot of vodka (here he would normally get 50 ml) he got very thick glass but the liquor constituted only 1/3 of it, hence my curiosity arose.

 

What is the general rule in the States as far as the shot/drink is concerned? As I was checking in Encyclopedia shot coressponds to 40 ml, which still makes 18.75 shots out of 750 ml if I count correctly.

 

Here, only beer is counterfeited (usually watered-down), spirits may sometimes come from relatively unknown source but are served in full glasses (bartenders might decrease the amount of them in cocktails, and it is advisable not to order them as not only they lack something but are quite expensive. One "Tequila Sunrise" or "Cuba Libre" or "Side Car" = the price of 250 ml of a decent vodka or brandy at the same bar).

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General rules are pretty lax. People will tell you that a normal alcohol serving is around 1 1/4 - 1 1/2 oz, but what they say in public, and what they say in the back rooms are two different things. Many bar owners (in my experience) will make it a point to tell their bartenders to pour light, especially after 11. Most customers won't know the difference, and it's saving them more liquor which will in turn make them more money.

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I say a shot is normally 3-4 cl. 4cl shots makes 18.75 drinks out of 75cl. I said that "In best case you'd get 20 drinks out of a 75cl bottle".

 

Shabba is correct about the "after 11" servings. It's the same everywhere...

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Quite the contrary with "After 11", around 9 p.m. happy hours usually take place and in fact people start coming to a bar. 4cl=40 ml is served in high-end restaurants or very exquisite bars, in others, it is usually 5cl=50 ml, if there exist at least two small bars when a shot is the traditional 100 ml.

 

Everything depends on the owner, his will. For example, in Irish Pubs, beers, though given in the menu as served in pints, are served in most of the cases in 500 ml, if in a shop you can get a real pint beer.

 

As for the portions, it is better to order 75 cl bottle than go by shots-the times when you were supposed to order 10 single shots instead of a 50 cl bottle are thanks God, gone.

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I lifted a couple of shot glasses from a local watering hole (night club / karaoke bar/ line dancing lessons every Sunday).

 

They measure one ounce to the line.

 

 

Jose Quervo was running $5 a shot and Grey Goose was $7 a shot eight years ago (last time I went there).

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Quite the contrary with "After 11", around 9 p.m. happy hours usually take place

On Mars, maybe, where you'd also find your 5cl shots.

Here on Earth, shots are 1oz, (3cl) Happy Hours are right after work, and bartenders pour light after 11.

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You do not have to travel that far, WBT, Poland is closer and there you will eye-witness everything I say.

 

2.5-3 cl is a measure in which liqueurs not spirits are usually served. Wines are for that matter served in 100-120-125 ml, vermouths, surprisingly, 50-100 ml.

 

The exception might be some brands of cognac which are served in the range 3-4 cl. And tequila is 4 cl, however, the other spirits not.

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A shot, where used as a term for a drink measure, is generally 1 to 1.5 ounces—that's 3 to 4.5 cl.

 

A shot, where used as a term for a drink, is whatever the bartender pours you.

 

In the interest of accuracy and better drinks, more bartenders are turning to the use of measured ounces rather than the more variable shots, jiggers and ponies.

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In the interest of accuracy and better drinks, more bartenders are turning to the use of measured ounces rather than the more variable shots, jiggers and ponies.

 

Does this mean that jiggers, ponies and others are no longer used? Interesting. Good to know.

 

In smaller bars, they usually have one big enough glass for measuring the given spirit and a series of different glasses in which one-two measures are poured. In more exquisite places, the spirit is poured directly from the bottle to the appropriate glass.

 

If a bartender started pouring lightly, he would be fired and the bar would lose the license for selling spirits (as well as beer). Here, it is treated as cheating people, dura lex sed lex.

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