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Gwydion Stone

Absinthe Marteau Verte Classique - Swiss Release

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*takes a deep breath*

 

I knew if I stuck around THIS board you folks would get this done somehow. I knew there was a reason I've been here for two years...

 

Good luck. We'll be waiting.

 

Aaron

 

EDIT: does this mean no more threads about smoking wormwood? I'm just asking...

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If I'm tipplin' again by October, I'll definitely lay in a supply.

You would.

 

I'm going to drink mine.

 

When you really Absomphesize, bathing in the stuff's no problem.

 

Besides, I'll bet it would make a better cologne than Hai Karate.

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From what I've read, you developed this Absinthe to be used in mixed drinks.

 

How does it do in a DITA?

 

Any recomendations on which Champaigne it goes with?

 

 

Congratulations and best wishes on your endevour.

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Congratulations!

 

I don't believe in absinthe "mixed drinks" but I look forward to tasting it with water!

 

In light of the current controversy regarding the very "robust" green color of some current absinthes, can you make any comment on the coloration? Thanks.

Edited by Marcel

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I'm wondering about your thoughts on the economics of Absinthe in mixed drinks.

 

I assume that when you say it will cost about the same as the other Matter Absinthes, we're talking $60-80 US before shipping. This makes for a rather expensive bottle.

 

The upper end for spirits in mixed drinks tends to be around $30. I'm bad at this sort of cost analysis type stuff; but, most bars using premium spirits price their drinks around $10-15 US. We're talking about a pretty boutique market, then, where prices like that are sustainable. New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle, London, etc.

 

However, it's true that in most well balanced cocktails where the Absinthe must co-exist with other flavors, contain not much more than a dash or two of Absinthe. So it's not that much of an issue, as long as you're talking about a bar that measures dashes.

 

Even traditional Absinthe Frappes or Absinthe Suissesse recipes usually only contain a pony (an ounce) of Absinthe, allowing you to price that about the same as a cocktail containing 2 oz of a spirit costing half as much. Though, modern recipes calling for Absinthe substitutes will need to be adjusted, if they are using "real" Absinthe. Another training issue.

 

I guess, leaving aside shipping, we're not talking about something costing too much more than some of the more expensive liqueurs, like Chartreuse (~$45 US), often used in about the same amount.

 

I've answered some of my own questions; but, what other challenges do you see getting your Absinthe onto the back bar and into cocktails?

 

~Erik

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The way I see it, that's probably going to be more of a longer term game plan, which will be much easier to implement once it begins production here in the states. That alone will dramatically reduce production and shipping costs, and lead to a more financially viable (and attractive) use for absinthe in cocktails.

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Great questions. One of the bars in NOLA is charging $20 a pop for a glass of absinthe. As you mention, the best absinthe cocktails contain only a dash or splash, so I expect not much will need to change in that area, but of course there's always marketing. I'm sure many places will charge more just because it's an absinthe drink.

How does it do in a DITA?

 

Any recomendations on which Champaigne it goes with?

You're asking the wrong guy. I'm not much of a champagne drinker in the first place, but I can't stand a DITA prepared according to Hemingway's instructions. I'd think just a splash in whatever you like already would be good.

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When some places sell basic mixed drinks for $10, I would assume absinthe will go for a high price long after the price of a bottle drops. Along those lines once it becomes more common in the US I think many bartenders will need to learn how to show off a louche so people will be entertained with their drink (beyond, "look High alcohol burns, isn't that amazing, I've never seen that before in my life" flaming drink)

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Ok, I have a confession.

 

I tasted my first flaming absinthe at TOTC. It was served by a blonde cutie, so I wasn't about to turn it down. Ugh! I couldn't stand that burned taste. People actually like that?

 

Since I was raised a Southern lass, I accepted the drink with a smile and "thank you".

 

I was asked which I preferred and, of course, I stated the non flame water drip. Unfortunately, I do think that the flame ritual will be popular at nightclubs because 'fire is cool'.

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Bartenders do love to light the stuff on fire, it's their moment in the spotlight, and they think it makes them look cool and in-the-know. Doing a proper louche is more difficult, slower, and less entertaining to a crowd, but it is still a display of skill, and I'm hoping bartenders will slowly begin to adopt it, and maybe even learn to make it look cool, because it is.

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If bars didn't always have that coyote ugly mood lighting a louche is more entertaining to watch that a few seconds of flames. Someone needs to invent a mini lighting saucer that will show off the louche in a dark bar.

 

And this is slowly getting off topic. Ok, perhaps the famous no flame logo should be printed on the back of every bottle :) (maybe with the suggestion that everclear burns just as pretty but doesn't waste a good tasting drink.)

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Café Brûlot is the ticket. Slightly altered and iced, it's called Café Diable. I'll post the recipe in the recipe thread.

 

Someone needs to invent a mini lighting saucer that will show off the louche in a dark bar.
Well, there's this. Unfortunately, it pulses, and it's also really clunky looking. What about a glass-top bar, lit from underneath?

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I have used that site before for beer glasses for my son's outdoor - in November - in Montana - wedding. It was a hoot at the reception, which was held at a state park on Flathead Lake. They glowed nicely for several hours. To clarify, the glasses and the guests both "glowed". :biggrin:

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Fire is cool. One night in NOLA, Tom the Waiter at Arnaud's served Nymph, Lars, Robert and myself a spectaclular Café Brulot. Fire has its place in drinks, absinthe just happens not to be it.

Have you watched the Small Screen Network "Molecular Mixology" video, where Jamie Boudreau makes his Rosewater Rickey?

 

Molecular Mixology with Jamie Boudreau - The Rosewater Rickey

 

Robert Hess and Jamie Boudreau talk for the first 8 minutes or so; but, then he makes the drink. At about 11:12 he brulees some cherries with flamed angostura bitters. Gets a 2 to 3 foot beautiful orange flame on the sucker.

 

Very nice. Drink looks good too.

 

~Erik

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I know I'm continuing off-topic, but in a bar, I really don't see the bartender taking the time to louche your drink for you while he/she explains the history of absinthe. Call me a skeptic if you will. ;)

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I once heard that absinthe makes you cut off your ear. What's the straight scoop on that?

 

 

FRIGGIN AWESOME NEWS! I am sooo glad I got to sample it beforehand. It's like... bragging rights or something, ha!

 

and to all y'all... It is GOOD. No, damn good. You are seriously going to love this stuff from the moment it hits your lips.

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I don't believe in absinthe "mixed drinks" but I look forward to tasting it with water!

 

Start with a Sazerac and see what you think. And yeah, absinthe is only used sparingly in most mixed drinks that it appears in as far as I know, but it's so evident that you don't need much to detect it.

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One of the best drinks I had all weekend was really just a sip of something Lars brought out of a TOTC seminar. Absinthe (Lucid, in fact) was one of the ingredients, along with......damn. Can't remember what, because it was some bizarre fruit puree or juice, plus a third something. If I'd seen the recipe on the page, I would never have tried it.

 

Lars, if you see this post, help me out one last time. What was in that drink?

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