Jump to content
Mayzandas

The Sazerac - perfected!

Recommended Posts

...In an ice cold rocks/old fashion glass, coat with herbsaint and dump.
Dump? *gasp* I hope you mean into your mouth!!
You can always compensate by pouring less. Yes, I feed my barsink pretty well sometimes.

In NOLA they add a splash of Herbsaint and then toss/twirl the glass in the air rapidly, supposedly to evenly coat the glass with Herbsaint. I have a theory that the technique evolved to discourage the use of too much Herbsaint/absinthe because if you do, you get it in the face.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1tsp Pernod 1906 Repro

Talking about PF 1901 in a fancy way or have I missed out on someone other than Jade making Pernod Fils reproductions?

 

You're missing something, I'm afraid. In my opinion, something really yummy. It's not your fault though, :)

 

The 1901 works just fine! Enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, this cocktail sounds amazing. I love Whiskey so I'm sure I'll like it. I was going to purchas a bottle of Kübler 53 tomorrow and was wondering if that would work well with Old Overholt in making this drink. I'm really starting to like this forumn :) Also, I've never really tried any bitters. What is the difference between Peychauds and Angustora bitters?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a very big difference between those two. Angustora is brown/orange heavily fragrant, faily bitter, but quite complex herbal blend. Peychauds is bright red and is a fair bit lighter in taste. Both of those as well as a good orange bitter should be in any cocktail makers collection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, I see. I managed to pick up a bottle of each at a small store here in town. I should be ordering the Kübler and Overholt tonight. Interested in seeing how this tastes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited to fix a typo)

 

...In an ice cold rocks/old fashion glass, coat with herbsaint and dump.

Dump? *gasp* I hope you mean into your mouth!!
You can always compensate by pouring less. Yes, I feed my barsink pretty well sometimes.

 

I always keep some absinthe (Marteau) in a small atomizer, which I use to easily lay down a fine layer onto my glasses without needing to waste any at all. Frankly, I think for "show" the atomizer works a ot better than the swirl/dump method.

 

For me, a Sazerac is never shaken, never uses Angostura, and always includes sugar.

 

I do however love to make my Sazeracs slightly different then you will usually find. Since this drink was originally created prior to common availbility of ice, I decided to make it without ice touching the liquid at all. I will chill the glass down (sometimes in the fridge, sometimes by putting some cracked ice in it), and then coat it with absinthe, add some simple syrup, Peychauds, rye whiskey, and a lemon twist (when I have fresh lemons at home).

 

The result is a "sipping" drink. I can easily picture myself calmly sipping my sazerac while sitting in a large wing-back leather chair in my library, in front of the fire, with my faithful dog at my feet, as a storm rages outside.

 

A common problem I always have in New Orleans with their Sazeracs, is they they make them WAY too sweet. I expect this is due to the fact that most customers are stumbling in off of Bourbon Street, and expecting a Hurricane or Hand Grenade. Bartenders learn to sweeten their drinks just to keep them from coming back.

 

-Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zig Zag will definitely take care of you, and they take pride in their Sazaracs.

 

All of the owners and bartenders are fantastic; Murray, who works Tuesday through Friday, is the star of the show. I'd suggest sitting at the bar, if it's just the two of you, and be sure to mention that you heard on this site that they were the guys to go to for a good Sazerac. They're familiar with this joint, and they really appreciate having people who pay a lot of attention to what they drink visiting their establishment. You'll be among friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So where can I get some Peychauds Bitters anyway? I've looked about a bit here in the Boston area to no avail. But then again, most liquor stores are pretty much "by the book" and almost never seem to branch out. I have to travel clear to Newton to get a reasonable bottle of Blue Curacao (not that mass produced crap).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend in Boston recommends BRIX Wine Shop in the South End, and mentioned that they carry Peychaud's, along with a bunch of other cool stuff. They were supposed to open a second store on Broad Street in October, but I have no idea if that's taken place or, really, where Broad Street is. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And if you don't mind such places, Amazon.

Since you mentioned it, I do. I attribute it to more than just my contradictory nature.

 

Brought to you by the Equal Posting Time Bureau of your forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haue never had a Sazerac and I would like to make one. The only problem is that I can only get Angostura bitters here and not Peychaud's. Does Angostura work as a substitute or is there no point? I know it's not authentic without Peychaud.

 

Also, I've seen some Sazerac recipes call for vermouth. I don't see vermouth mentioned in any recipes in this thread. What are your thoughts on that? Don't use vermouth? Only use it for the Waldorf sazerac?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×