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My reply from DUNY 5 minutes ago.

 

Good Morning Bill. I actually tasted it yesterday. That shit is good.

 

We will pick it up soon.

 

Thanks,

Kamal

 

 

Again, good communication with customers = mo $$$

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That shit is good.

 

And we're concerned about the more mature, businesslike image that the use of real names will give this distinguished forum. :laf: ;)

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Knickerbocker Gin, from Holland Michigan. Anybody tried it? I was in my favorite local liquor store a few minutes ago, and decided to pick up a bottle to see what a local distillery is putting out. We'll see this weekend if it tastes any good or not, compared to that stuff in the blue bottle up there.

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[Jay waves a dead chicken over this thread and chants some dark vodun]. Resurrection!

 

I'm not a gin connoisseur by any means (not least because I dislike just about every variation of gin martini), but at present I'd say Aviation and Hendricks are at the top of my list. Of course, there's a certain Montana gin I have not yet had the pleasure of tasting.

 

Tonight, my ladylove and I tried New Amsterdam for the first time, and we enjoyed it. Yes, it is light on the juniper in favor of the citrus overtones, but it works quite well in a G&T. Of course, we generally put twice as much fresh lime in that as standard recipes call for, so that's definitely a factor.

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I finished a bottle of bourbon barreled Big Gin recently. It's a good gin, but there's not as much of a barrely taste as I had hoped for.

 

It's the juniper that stands out, as should be expected in a gin. I was expecting it to be more like the Ransom old tom.

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Voyager (My go to/staple gin) and No. 3 London Dry are my favorites so far. I always buy extra Voyager...because it doesn't seem to last long around here. :cheerz:

Edited by Cajun Magic

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I used to think that gin was just gin, but thanks to some friends on here I got a sample of some Voyager. It was like night and day! Notes of citrus mingling with the Juniper was very balanced. Too bad my last batch evaporated so quickly.

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I prefer my Gin in a London Dry style, though I've not had the pleasure or an Old Tom or Genever. I don't much care for American/New Wave/International style gins like Bluecoat, I often joke that American/New Wave/International Style Gin is for people that don't like Gin because in my experience they lack the back bone for cocktails. Their flavor profiles yield too easily to the other ingredients.

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I've only had Bombay Sapphire and Hendrick's (bottle of each in the kitchen currently), and enjoyed both, though I think I prefer the Hendrick's. Have been trying to find one of the new Old Tom formulations, like Haysom's, but have not been able to track it down. Will probably need to go the mail-order route there, as well.

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Hayman's is definitely worth the quest.

 

I prefer my Gin in a London Dry style, though I've not had the pleasure or an Old Tom or Genever. I don't much care for American/New Wave/International style gins like Bluecoat, I often joke that American/New Wave/International Style Gin is for people that don't like Gin because in my experience they lack the back bone for cocktails. Their flavor profiles yield too easily to the other ingredients.

I'm not sure what it is since I'm not a distiller, but my experience is that many of the new, small producer gins out there seem to be noticeably flawed. Apparently, making it is harder than just buying yourself a still and firing it up. I just tasted another new one last night that had all kinds of plasticy, vinyly aromas and flavors. Yuk!

 

As for the new style products that are soundly made, the trouble is that some of them are so idiosyncratic (one with prominent notes of apple and hops comes to mind) that there is no real predictability to using them in classic mixed drinks. I don't think it's so much that they always "yield too easily to the other ingredients", but that they don't behave like gin because they are so far off the mainstream paradigm for gin. This is not to say that they are not an interesting product in their own way, just that they are unique enough that they require specialized handling and formulation in mixing. You can't just pick them up, use them in an established drink, and count on them playing nicely with others.

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As someone who usually isn't into gin, I really enjoy Farmer's botanical organic gin out of Minnesota.  Its known botanicals are apple, coriander, hops, lavender, mint and juniper, along with some possible elderflower.  It makes delicious in a gin & tonic and its subtle sweetness makes it my favorite spirit to drink neat.



 

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