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Bayou Cocktail

 

1 oz. gin

1 oz. sweet vermouth

1 oz. Herbsaint Original (do not sub regular Herbsaint, which is lower proof and a different formula)

1-2 dashes of Bitter Truth Creole Bitters (or sub Peychaud's)

 

Stir with ice and strain into chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with flamed lemon peel.

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Or........Leave out the Gin

 

But where would the fun be in that, Impy? :)

 

By the way, it probably goes without saying, but I'd recommend using an assertive gin in the Bayou cocktail--something (like Tanqueray, for example) that can stand up to the herbaceousness of the Herbsaint Original. Interestingly, I thought the same would be true of the vermouth and so used Carpano in the first test run; it turns out that I prefer the softer and lighter Dolin rouge, however. Your mileage may vary.

 

As with the Bijou, it's possible to change up the ratios if you prefer a less herbaceous cocktail: say 1.5 oz of gin to .5 oz each of the vermouth and Herbsaint. This brings the drink closer to something resembling an Obituary cocktail. I think the original formula of 1:1:1 results in a more interesting and novel drink, however.

 

Enjoy!

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I haven't tried the Dolin yet, it's on my list.

 

The Herbsaint New Orleans Cocktail works pretty well with the Carpano, someday I may use a few drops of the 1930s Legendre bitters resting in the cabinet someday.

 

J.M. Legendre made his own Sweet Vermouth back in the day, that's something I'd like to see again....

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I tried the New Orleans cocktail with Carpano and it was delicious. I think that for the purposes of this Bijou variation, though, the Carpano is too "big" to work well with the other big flavors in the drink--too much testosterone in the room, as it were. The Dolin rouge, which is a relatively mild, floral sweet vermouth, nicely contrasts with and complements the bold herbal flavors of the Herbsaint Original and the gin, IMO. It also allows the H.O. to play the central role in the cocktail, the way that Chartreuse does in the original.

 

 

J.M. Legendre made his own Sweet Vermouth back in the day, that's something I'd like to see again....

 

Definitely. Make it happen!

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As yet unnamed cocktail I made up

 

-2 ounces of gin

-3/4 ounces of dry vermouth

-3/4 ounces of Cointreau

-few dashes of Éixir Végétal de la Grande Chartreuse

 

Stir thoroughly with ice, strain and garnish with lemon zest.

62194_435172821645_599556645_5736132_4478482_n.jpg

 

 

I was trying to find a cocktail in which to use the Chartreuse concentrate. I tried a martini and it was alright but definitely tasted fuller with the Cointreau. Don't have a name for it yet, any suggestions?

Edited by Heavy Harpoon

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Having another Bayou cocktail. Looks like I may have to eat my words about my vermouth preference in this drink. I got a hold of a bottle of Vya sweet vermouth when I was in New York this weekend and mixed up 3/4 oz. each of Tanqueray, Vya, and Herbsaint Original with two dashes of Creole bitters and flamed lemon. Absolutely fantastic. The Vya takes it to a whole new level.

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Vya makes a damn fine sweet vermouth. For dry, I have lately been on and on about Dolin and Perucchi

 

In an Old Pal with Old Overholt, I prefer the Perucchi...it's amazing.

 

For my Martini lately, I have found Junipero + Dolin dry + Fee Bros orange bitters to be an amazingly delicious combo.

 

Speaking of drinks. Anybody have any good ideas for something I can do with Fernet Branca (besides a Hanky Panky)?

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I've always had a weakness for Zombies, so about this one...

 

 

Zombie Amari

 

1oz blackstrap rum

1oz pisco

1/2oz Fernet Branca

1/2oz gin (used Bluecoat, any “flowery” gin is preferred)

1oz lemon juice

1oz passion fruit syrup

1oz pineapple juice

1/4oz honey mix

1/4oz Pernod or other anisette

 

Shake with a mountain of crushed ice.

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Vya makes a damn fine sweet vermouth. For dry, I have lately been on and on about Dolin and Perucchi

 

The Vya is blowing me away--the perfect autumnal sweet vermouth. Love the Dolin dry too; haven't tried Perucchi.

 

In an Old Pal with Old Overholt, I prefer the Perucchi...it's amazing.

 

The Old Pal is a great drink. Much as I love rye, though, I actually prefer a high-proof Bourbon like Old Weller 107 in this one: the ABV and the sweetness of the Bourbon help to offset the bitterness of the Campari. Delicious.

 

Anybody have any good ideas for something I can do with Fernet Branca (besides a Hanky Panky)?

 

Sorry. I've never been able to wrap my head around Fernet; I just can't get past the menthol. And I love Italian amaros. Even the relatively inoffensive Hanky Panky hasn't converted me. A search on the Cocktail Database brings up two dozen or so recipes, though. Knock yourself out!

 

The original Zombie used vintage Herbsaint.

 

Not surprising, since Donn the Beachcomber (aka Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt), the creator of the Zombie, was a native of Louisiana. The signature secret ingredient of many of his drinks was actually a dash of Herbsaint combined with a dash of Angostura bitters. Here's his original 1934 recipe for the Zombie, if anyone's interested. The name of that drink is well earned.

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The original Zombie used vintage Herbsaint.

 

Not surprising, since Donn the Beachcomber (aka Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt), the creator of the Zombie, was a native of Louisiana. The signature secret ingredient of many of his drinks was actually a dash of Herbsaint combined with a dash of Angostura bitters. Here's his original 1934 recipe for the Zombie, if anyone's interested. The name of that drink is well earned.

 

I suspect J.M. Legendre and Donn knew about one another, Mr. Legendre was very adept at getting Herbsaint around to specific people.

 

That is another story....

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This one was one of the cocktails served at a client appreciation event I held at the Columbia Room the Tuesday before Thanksgiving. It's tremendous, and easy to make.

 

 

The Getaway Cocktail

Also known as the Cynar Daiquiri, it blends the Italian digestivo with dark rum. With lemon juice and simple syrup, this drink is refreshing, delicious, and powerful.

 

• 1 ounce Cruzan Black Strap Rum

• ½ ounce Cynar

• 1 ounce lemon juice

• ½ ounce simple syrup

 

Combine spirits with ice and shake vigorously until properly diluted (to about three and a half ounces). Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

 

Note: You simply MUST use the blackstrap rum for this drink, as the molasses undertones are really what set it apart.

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The Getaway Cocktail

Also known as the Cynar Daiquiri, it blends the Italian digestivo with dark rum. With lemon juice and simple syrup, this drink is refreshing, delicious, and powerful.

Thanks for sharing that one Brian, I actually have all of the ingredients on hand, may give it a try tomorrow. I picked up that Black Strap on a whim quite some time ago, and I just haven't had much luck with it, and it ends up pushed to the back of the shelf. The Cynar should tame it a bit!

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I picked up that Black Strap on a whim quite some time ago, and I just haven't had much luck with it, and it ends up pushed to the back of the shelf.

It works well as a float, started using it that way since it's a component of Death in the South Pacific. Navan is another float I started using after trying it in the Wisdom of Pele.

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Sounds like a great recipe - I would even try the same with Gran Classico Bitter instead of the Cynar, if you need something more substantial to tame the rum...

 

I picked up my first bottle of Gran Classico a few weeks ago--it's terrific stuff. Makes the best Negroni I've ever had and now I regularly sub it into recipes calling for Campari. Its flavor profile strikes me as being pretty different than Cynar's however...

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