Jump to content

 

Photo

Cocktail Recipes


  • Please log in to reply
323 replies to this topic

#1 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 18 June 2007 - 06:56 PM

Chuck Taggert, the man behind The Gumbo Pages, touts this as a good summer drink.

St. Charles Gin and Tonic

The juice of one lime, freshly squeezed
2 ounces gin (don't use cheap gin)
5 ounces tonic water
4 healthy dashes Peychaud's bitters
Lime wedge

Fill a highball glass almost to the top with cracked ice cubes. Add the lime juice, then the gin. Fill with the tonic water, then add the bitters (don't be shy). Rub the lime wedge around the rim of the glass, then add it as a garnish. Swizzle and serve.

#2 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:07 PM

My father belonged to a fusty old men's club in New Orleans. The building itself was fusty and old, and only fusty old men belonged to it, or so it seemed to me.

On the occasion of my eighteenth birthday (legal drinking age in those days), my father took me to the club and ordered Ojen cocktails for the two of us. Ojen is a Spanish anise liqueur that louches, and I remember thinking that a pale green, opaque, anise-flavored cocktail was pretty exotic — as exotic as my being old enough to drink. It was all of a piece.

With Peychaud bitters among the ingredients, this recipe must be similar to, if not the same New Orleans cocktail I had with my father.

Ojen Cocktail

2 oz Ojen anise liqueur
1 dash Peychaud bitters
1 tsp sugar
1/2 oz water

Pour the Ojen, Peychaud bitters, sugar and water into a cocktail shaker half-filled with ice cubes. Shake well, strain into a cocktail glass, and serve.

#3 Pan Buh

Pan Buh

    Incomplete Absinthe Geek

  • Indefinite Suspension
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,850 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:16 PM

Was it a sign that he knew what laid in store for you?

#4 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:28 PM

We do wish he'd lived long enough to see the return of absinthe. His own father (my grandfather) still had a few bottles of leftover pre-ban in the 1930s. My father loved it.

In New Orleans, the popularity of anise drinks may have lasted into the '40s, but thereafter they were mostly relegated to a supporting role in cocktails. Tourists can still order an "absinthe frappe" at Brennan's (made, I suppose, with Herbsaint), but it's unlikely that the majority of New Orleanians have ever had one.

Absinthe has an underground following, of course.

#5 Brian Robinson

Brian Robinson

    Shabba

  • Advisory Board
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,907 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:32 PM

Ojen Cocktail

2 oz Ojen anise liqueur
1 dash Peychaud bitters
1 tsp sugar
1/2 oz water


While living in Spain, they made similar cocktails, but they used Zoco. They were pretty tasty!
Answers to common newcomer questions.

List of WS articles from across the web.


Help other absintheurs and newcomers by submitting a review. Click here to go to the main review page to submit your entry.

Rantings of a DC Gourmand.
WS on the Mutineer Blog!

#6 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:43 PM

The description is so strange!

"[Zoco] Pacharan is made by soaking sloe berries, collected from the blackthorn, in an anise-flavoured spirit (anisette) with a small number of coffee beans and a vanilla pod for several months."

#7 ejellest

ejellest

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 349 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:54 PM

The description is so strange!

"[Zoco] Pacharan is made by soaking sloe berries, collected from the blackthorn, in an anise-flavoured spirit (anisette) with a small number of coffee beans and a vanilla pod for several months."

Wow, that is weird.

I made plum infused gin last year, I can't imagine the same thing made with anise flavored spirit instead.

Wacky.

So Ojen is green?

I've had Anise del Mono dulce. That's a louching, clear, anise flavored liqueur from spain. There's also an Anise del Mono seco, that is less sweet. But, I believe it is also clear. The Anise del Mono is pretty good; but, similar to Lebanese Arak, in that the herb/spice component is fairly simple.
Erik Ellestad
Bernal Heights, San Francisco, CA, USA

#8 Boggy

Boggy

    Delusions of Competence

  • Canned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,129 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 12:54 PM

All descriptions are quite weird at times, read the absinthe section for example (like one of our "favs": http://www.productsf..._Absinthe.html).

The selection, however is quite vast.
Surviving the attacks of mentally-deficient creatures of the dark and carrying on (since 1999).
 
[Ironically, 1999 is the year the Dunning-Kruger effect was first advanced. - Admin]=

#9 Brian Robinson

Brian Robinson

    Shabba

  • Advisory Board
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,907 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 01:02 PM

The description is so strange!


Aye. But the flavor is still predominantly anis. They love Zoco in their coffee in the mornings too.

There was a great little cafe/hole-in-the-wall off of the red line exit at the Plaza De Castilla metro station that I'd go to to have some coffee and tortilla in the mornings before work. I'd watch all of these businessmen ordering their whiskey and or cafe con Zoco before they head to the office.

That place made the absolute BEST Tortilla Espanola I've ever had. Damn, now I'm waxing nostalgic... :3869-sadbanana:



Also, found this recipe and thought I'd make it up later this week.

Maker's Mark Peach tea

1 cup Maker's Mark
1/2 cup Peach Schnapps
1 peach sliced
1 1/2 quarts of iced tea

Sounds like it would be quite refreshing.
Answers to common newcomer questions.

List of WS articles from across the web.


Help other absintheurs and newcomers by submitting a review. Click here to go to the main review page to submit your entry.

Rantings of a DC Gourmand.
WS on the Mutineer Blog!

#10 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 19 June 2007 - 01:30 PM

So Ojen is green?

Yes, and I've read that it's a seasonal product. So it's sometimes hard to find.

I've had Anise del Mono dulce. That's a louching, clear, anise flavored liqueur from spain. There's also an Anise del Mono seco, that is less sweet. But, I believe it is also clear. The Anise del Mono is pretty good; but similar to Lebanese Arak, in that the herb/spice component is fairly simple.

Europeans love anise. It's such an old-world flavor. It'll never be big here in Chocolate MartiniLand.

All descriptions are quite weird at times, read the absinthe section for example (like one of our "favs": http://www.productsf..._Absinthe.html).

I was browsing those descriptions. Wild!

Shabba, that iced tea recipe looks really Southern, and really good. Speaking of Zoco and coffee, the original La Fée is tolerable in coffee (although after three years, my bottle of La Fée is still 3/4 full).

#11 Amber von Doom

Amber von Doom

    Mercury Girl

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 814 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 02:30 PM

Be warned: I like sweet.

The Jollytini - so named because it goes in a martini glass (sorry to the martini purists!) and tastes like a Jolly Rancher.

1 part Watermelon Martini Mix
1 part Grape flavoured Vodka

How simple can you get?!
Some people are like slinkies...
they aren't good for much, but they make you smile when you push them down the stairs.



#12 peridot

peridot

    Floccinaucinihilipilificator Extraordinaire

  • Content Team
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,052 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 04:19 PM

It's not a martini glass. It's a cocktail glass. :) Just imagine if every drink that were served in a cocktail glass had "tini" tacked on the end of it.

Throng of Shoggoths: Lovecraftian Sludge

Pudwich: 90's style hard rock

My stupid facebutt page.


#13 Nymphadora

Nymphadora

    Very silly. Very silly indeed.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,639 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:37 PM

Stat! I think some alcohol snobs just had a coronary.
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

#14 Gwydion Stone

Gwydion Stone

    Founder

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,386 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:58 PM

It's not a martini glass. It's a cocktail glass.

You are correct sir, and thank you.

Maker of Marteau Absinthe and Foxtrot London Dry Gin

Please don't forget to sign up for our newsletter, and consider a subscription donation.
Every bit helps the further development of the site and future events.


#15 peridot

peridot

    Floccinaucinihilipilificator Extraordinaire

  • Content Team
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,052 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 07:03 PM

Stat! I think some alcohol snobs just had a coronary.

Shit, why do you think there haven't been any more responses so far?

Oh wait, it's Sunday and only us losers are hanging around.

Throng of Shoggoths: Lovecraftian Sludge

Pudwich: 90's style hard rock

My stupid facebutt page.


#16 Joe Legate

Joe Legate

    2 jobs. 0 sense.

  • Advisory Board
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,154 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 07:29 PM

The description is so strange!
"[Zoco] Pacharan is made by soaking sloe berries, collected from the blackthorn, in an anise-flavoured spirit (anisette) with a small number of coffee beans and a vanilla pod for several months."

I'd really like a taste. Very curious! :g:

It's not a martini glass. It's a cocktail glass. :) Just imagine if every drink that were served in a cocktail glass had "tini" tacked on the end of it.

Dammit, Peridot! I keep thinking, "Tittytini would be a....? A Weenietini would be a...? Of course, a Bikinitini would only make so much mental floss." It's like having a song from the 1910 Fruit Gum Company stuck in your head...



D'Oh! :blink:

#17 Nymphadora

Nymphadora

    Very silly. Very silly indeed.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,639 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 07:52 PM

Sloe and blackthorn? Sounds like sloe gin. I actually like that stuff. Granny bought this gorgeous cocktail serving cart in Italy and it houses her sloe gin and other spirits. Granny was also gorgeous and drove an Indian motorcycle.
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

#18 Alan Moss

Alan Moss

    absinthe-suisse.com

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,754 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 08:47 PM

Well, since Brooks asked, here are two very recent UK creations. The first is very good; I have yet to try the second. WARNING: If you don't like burning absinthe, don't read the second recipe!

Clandestine Caipirinha (as served at the London Bar Show)

Glass: Old fashioned/ small rocks

50ml La Clandestine Absinthe
12.5ml Ice water
5 wedges of fresh cut lime
1 bar spoon muscovado sugar
Crushed Ice

Using your small rocks/old fashioned add the bar spoon of sugar, 50ml Clandestine and 12.5ml ice water. Using the spoon, stir the contents allowing for all the sugar to seperate. Squeeze and drop the 5 pieces of lime in to the drink and once again use the bar spoon to stir the contents. Finally fill the glass with crushed ice and stir all ingredients through the drink, making sure that all flavours are perfectly mixed together.

--------------------------------------------------------

Steamers Boat (as served at Adrian's Bar, 82 West Nile Street Glasgow, Scotland)

Glass: Chilled Flute

Orange zests soaked in Clandestine for 3 days and brown sugar (covered with clingfilm)
25ml La Clandestine Absinthe
Champagne of your choice

In a brandy balloon, add 2 of the absinthe soaked orange zests with some of the brown sugar and 25ml Clandestine. Usinge a lighter, light the Absinthe and start swirling the glass allowing the sugar to caramelise and some of the alcohol to burn off. After about a minute blow out the flame and using a hawthorn strainer, transfer into a chilled flute. Top up with Champagne and garnish with a flamed absinthe soaked orange zest (beware as this can be slightly dangerous!).

Both recipes created by Darroch of Black Tie Bartending.
www.laclandestine.com: Hand-crafted in the birthplace of absinthe.

#19 Pan Buh

Pan Buh

    Incomplete Absinthe Geek

  • Indefinite Suspension
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,850 posts

Posted 24 June 2007 - 09:48 PM

That second one has the potential for an unpleasant thermal shock experience.

#20 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 08:03 AM

Thank you, Alan!

#21 drcocktail

drcocktail

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 481 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 02:20 PM

A few things....Ojen is clear. Long ago it came in a lightly-green colored bottle, though. Here is some 1930s ojen (which, by the way, is pronounce Oh-Hen) and here is some from the 1960s. The current product looks almost exactly the same as the latter bottling. It is very anisette-like but was always described in more absinthe-like terms. Tastes like very good anisette to me, and nothing wrong with that.

Pacharan: this stuff is delightful, and Nymphadora is exactly right: the blackthorn plum (which is the very same thing as the sloeberry) is the base for sloe gin, but also some pretty great eau de vie as well. I can't think of another fruit with as many very different liqueurs and eaux de vie deriving from it.

The Pacharan I have is different from the description of the Zoco brand in that mine (Basarana 20) is light and only lightly sweet, so not thick either. It's pretty lovely stuff. Here's a nifty little article about it complete with a cocktail.

--Doc.
Fledermaus means inflatable mouse.

#22 ejellest

ejellest

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 349 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 02:49 PM

[...]
Pacharan: this stuff is delightful, and Nymphadora is exactly right: the blackthorn plum (which is the very same thing as the sloeberry) is the base for sloe gin, but also some pretty great eau de vie as well. I can't think of another fruit with as many very different liqueurs and eaux de vie deriving from it.

The Pacharan I have is different from the description of the Zoco brand in that mine (Basarana 20) is light and only lightly sweet, so not thick either. It's pretty lovely stuff. Here's a nifty little article about it complete with a cocktail.

--Doc.

I get the heebie jeebies whenever I see Creme de Bananas in a cocktail!

I was really surprised how much I enjoyed a Blackthorn Cocktail No. 2 made with 1 oz Carpano Antica Italian vermouth and 2 oz home made plum infused gin, and a dash of orange bitters.

Might be worth a try with Pacharan.

edit - oops! Forgot the orange bitters.

Edited by ejellest, 25 June 2007 - 03:23 PM.

Erik Ellestad
Bernal Heights, San Francisco, CA, USA

#23 drcocktail

drcocktail

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 481 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 03:01 PM

Man, that DOES sound good! --Doc.
Fledermaus means inflatable mouse.

#24 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 04:20 PM

A few things....Ojen is clear. Long ago it came in a lightly-green colored bottle, though.

And it louches.........although clear spirits louche white. Don't know why I remember the louche as pale green.

Maybe it's a green glass that I remember.

Or a garnish of green mold.

#25 Nymphadora

Nymphadora

    Very silly. Very silly indeed.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,639 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 04:56 PM

Nymphadora is exactly right: the blackthorn plum (which is the very same thing as the sloeberry) is the base for sloe gin, but also some pretty great eau de vie as well. I can't think of another fruit with as many very different liqueurs and eaux de vie deriving from it.


I'm right about something?! :blink:
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

#26 Amber von Doom

Amber von Doom

    Mercury Girl

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 814 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:01 PM

I just put some Pepsi in a martini glass and have thus dubbed it Peptini.
Some people are like slinkies...
they aren't good for much, but they make you smile when you push them down the stairs.



#27 peridot

peridot

    Floccinaucinihilipilificator Extraordinaire

  • Content Team
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,052 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:06 PM

Peptini makes me think of this:
Posted Image

Throng of Shoggoths: Lovecraftian Sludge

Pudwich: 90's style hard rock

My stupid facebutt page.


#28 Nymphadora

Nymphadora

    Very silly. Very silly indeed.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,639 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:08 PM

:puke:
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

#29 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:10 PM

Speaking of "In the pink," I wonder if a few dashes of Peychaud would tint a white louche pink?? Maybe that Ojen cocktail wasn't pale green, as I remember it, but pink.

You know you're losing it when you can't keep your pastels straight.

#30 Brooks

Brooks

    Bo-nana Fana Fo-Frooks

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,492 posts

Posted 25 June 2007 - 09:21 PM

HA! Serendipitously, I just came across a downloadable 1937 New Orleans bar guide called:

Famous New Orleans Drinks
and how to mix 'em

by Stanley Clisby Arthur


Among the recipes was this one, which answers my question about a pink louche:

Ojen Cocktail

1 jigger Ojen
2-3 dashes Peychaud bitters
Seltzer water


Stir the mixture in a barglass with ice, add a little seltzer or other charged water, and strain into a frapped cocktail glass. The bitters give this Ojen a delicate rose-colored tinge. Therefore it masquerades under the name of "Pink Shimmy," or pinque chemise, if you prefer the language of the fifty million who can't be wrong.


So....while I may have gotten my pastels mixed up, my memory of a tinted louche was on target. Now I feel better.
.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright © 2017 The Wormwood Society Absinthe Association